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1 - 10 of 28 results for: GSBGEN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GSBGEN 299: The Core Curriculum in the Workplace

GSB students are eligible to report on work experience that is relevant to their core studies under the direction of the Senior Associate Dean responsible for the MBA Program. Registration for this work must be approved by the Assistant Dean of the MBA Program and is limited to students who present a project which, in judgment of the Advisor, may be undertaken to enhance the material learned in the first year core required courses. It is expected that this research be carried on by the student with a large degree of independence and the expected result is a written report, typically due at the end of the quarter in which the course is taken. Specific assignment details and deadline information will be communicated to enrolled students. Units earned for this course do not meet the requirements needed for graduation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)

GSBGEN 307: Policy Time

Policy Time is about the policy choices faced by senior American policymakers. Our main perspective is American and executive: decisions faced by the U.S. President, Governors, and their advisors. The lessons can extend to certain international settings as well. We have two main goals:n1. To begin to build your personal policy approach, in which you will figure out how your values translate into real-world policy choices; and 2. To learn what it is like to be a senior policymaker. Each week will cover a different policy topic. Likely topics include immigration reform, economics, whether and when and how companies should take public positions on policy issues, guns and gun control, social media policy challenges, the opioid crisis, and trade and industrial policy. Our exact topic schedule is flexible based in part on current events. This class is heavily participatory and involves a lot of class discussion. You will write 5-10 weekly short memos to explain your choices. This class is for beginners and assumes you have no prior knowledge of policy or politics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 309: Housing and the Mortgage Market

Political gamesmanship, financial crises, and financial innovation come hand-in-hand with real estate finance, which has played a central role in the rise and fall of economies, financial institutions, and the lives of ordinary Americans. This course explores these issues in depth. We examine the past, present, and future of the complex political economy surrounding real estate finance, its impact on markets, and the business challenges and opportunities arising from it, both domestically and abroad, before and after the financial crisis. We then tackle recent trends like the rise of shadow banks, fintech, and proptech. Through a mix of speakers, case studies, and hands-on exercises, we examine the problems these industries are solving and creating.Greg Buchak is an Assistant Professor in the Finance group at Stanford. He received his PhD in financial economics and JD in law from the University of Chicago. His research focuses on the industrial organization of financial intermediation more »
Political gamesmanship, financial crises, and financial innovation come hand-in-hand with real estate finance, which has played a central role in the rise and fall of economies, financial institutions, and the lives of ordinary Americans. This course explores these issues in depth. We examine the past, present, and future of the complex political economy surrounding real estate finance, its impact on markets, and the business challenges and opportunities arising from it, both domestically and abroad, before and after the financial crisis. We then tackle recent trends like the rise of shadow banks, fintech, and proptech. Through a mix of speakers, case studies, and hands-on exercises, we examine the problems these industries are solving and creating.Greg Buchak is an Assistant Professor in the Finance group at Stanford. He received his PhD in financial economics and JD in law from the University of Chicago. His research focuses on the industrial organization of financial intermediation and it¿s consequences in the real estate industry.Chris Mahowald is actively involved in the real estate investment business as the managing partner of RSF Partners, a series of real estate private equity funds totaling over $1 billion in equity. The firm invests across product types throughout the U.S. During his career, he has focused on value investing with deep experience in distressed mortgage debt. He also teaches real estate investment at the GSB ( GSBGEN 306: Real Estate Investment).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 310: Business and AI: Lessons from Entrepreneurs, Executives, and Investors

As AI technology advances at an unprecedented pace, both start-ups and established corporations are racing to harness its potential, aiming to revolutionize every sector with innovative applications. What are these opportunities, and how are these firms creating a sustainable competitive advantage? In this class, the teaching team will guide interactive classroom discussions on adopting AI in business. Guest speakers - CEOs or venture capitalists at the forefront of AI - will tell their stories, offering valuable insights from a myriad of industries and perspectives. The structure for this course will be a combination of: addressing what is different about starting an AI company; asking how AI companies (particularly Generative AI) are being valued and the associated risks; exploring how large companies are rapidly adopting AI; and introducing relevant economic models. Almost all days will have engaging speakers, and 50% of your course grade will be participation, as you interact with more »
As AI technology advances at an unprecedented pace, both start-ups and established corporations are racing to harness its potential, aiming to revolutionize every sector with innovative applications. What are these opportunities, and how are these firms creating a sustainable competitive advantage? In this class, the teaching team will guide interactive classroom discussions on adopting AI in business. Guest speakers - CEOs or venture capitalists at the forefront of AI - will tell their stories, offering valuable insights from a myriad of industries and perspectives. The structure for this course will be a combination of: addressing what is different about starting an AI company; asking how AI companies (particularly Generative AI) are being valued and the associated risks; exploring how large companies are rapidly adopting AI; and introducing relevant economic models. Almost all days will have engaging speakers, and 50% of your course grade will be participation, as you interact with them and with your peers. There are two assignments and a group project. The faculty will provide a structured foundation to guide you, and short lectures on a number of topics. Students do not need in-depth technical knowledge of AI; you will be expected to learn the basics along the way, and will be taught about LLM models through examples.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensu more »
Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback. In this course you will learn to: - Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational level - Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents - Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style - Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences - Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aids Students at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 317: Reputation Management: Strategies for Successful Communicators

Successful leaders have to conceive, author, rebuild, pivot, differentiate, and finally maintain a personal reputation to make a lasting, recognizable and powerful identity. Reputation Management will explore how you can effectively communicate to create, adapt and maintain your personal reputation. Your reputation remains fluid as you navigate your career decisions and interact with different professionals along your journey. The course is designed along three interlocking elements: reputation management literature, relevant case studies, and curated guest speakers. Students will learn the fundamentals of strategic corporate communication and the risk of not managing reputation effectively. These frameworks will be extended with specific case studies to illustrate where individuals, groups, and firms have faced the challenge of managing reputation effectively. We will focus on both traditional and virtual components of communication including the relevancy of online reputation management. Finally we will invite well-known leaders from a range of industries who have built and sustained their reputations, through effective communication. Each leader has had to manage their reputations in the public eye, and alongside their peers, supervisors, and employees. Guests will be invited to discuss their conscious and unplanned strategies of how to successfully communicate the kind of person, leader, innovator, or public figure they strive to be. Students will benefit from a rich blend of frameworks, cases, and speakers enabling them to successfully enter the work force and create their own, personal reputations. Students will create a case study drawn from their own experience (or personal network), of a reputation dilemma. A final assignment requires students to research their own reputation history by projecting what they think their reputation is, creating their own survey for friends, colleagues and employers to take, conduct three interviews about their personal reputation with three individuals who have worked closely with them, and then synthesize all this feedback into a cohesive paper and short video that reflects their authentic work and personal reputation. Throughout the course students will post at least one blog drawn from class concepts and respond to posts by peers in the class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kluger, A. (PI)

GSBGEN 320: Neuroscience and the Connection to Sustained Excellence

Recent work on human performance is beginning to unravel biological, neurobiological and psychological factors that separate the best performers from the rest, providing rich insights into how we all can (re)wire our mind and body for manifesting sustained excellence. Adopting the format of a retreat, the thrust of this course is two-fold. First, expose students to neurobiological frameworks, serving as scaffolding for appreciating the importance of practices aimed hacking the body and the mind such as breathing, naps, laughter, fitness, etc. for setting oneself up for peak performance. Second, give students a chance to transform their own body and mind by experimenting with various techniques such as parasympathetic breathing, micro-breaks, the I(Interrupt)-R(Relax)-R(Reframe), the Invisioning-Envisioning series of exercises, etc. Students will be encouraged to monitor their transformation, including regular measurements of their Heart Rate Variability (HRV), a key marker for the emotional resilience and vibrancy that are at the core of manifesting sustained excellence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 339: Negotiation Dynamics in Sports, Entertainment and Media

Negotiation is a central part of business in the worlds of sports and entertainment. This course will examine negotiation dynamics and key takeaways for general management from multiple different settings where negotiations had an important role--these will include preparing for a negotiation, the negotiation process itself, contractual outcomes of negotiation and their execution and in some cases litigation. The settings will include negotiations over player and actor contracts, negotiations between leagues and players associations, negotiations between investors and movie companies, and negotiations between content providers (both in sports and entertainment) and distribution partners (such as cable stations, international media companies, and online companies such as Netflix). Each of the six sessions is planned to include at least one and in some cases two guests that have had extensive experience in negotiations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 352: Winning Writing

This once-a-week full-quarter workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, cold-call letters, speeches, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 357: U.S.-China: Strategic Competition and Cooperation

This is a course to help future business leaders understand the policy risks that result from the changing relationship between the United States and China.Driven in part by policy decisions over the past decade in Washington and Beijing, the world built by the West after World War II is changing. Most American policymakers now label the relationship between the U.S. and China as one of strategic competition. They are often less clear on whether this term applies to the governments, the peoples, the businesses based within each country, or the two nation-states. At the same time, these two superpowers also have shared interests. We seek to understand the changing relationships between the U.S. and China, and what both competition and possible cooperation between their governments mean for others. American business leaders may be caught between two governments with conflicting interests. Business leaders in other countries may be caught among three governments: America, China, and their more »
This is a course to help future business leaders understand the policy risks that result from the changing relationship between the United States and China.Driven in part by policy decisions over the past decade in Washington and Beijing, the world built by the West after World War II is changing. Most American policymakers now label the relationship between the U.S. and China as one of strategic competition. They are often less clear on whether this term applies to the governments, the peoples, the businesses based within each country, or the two nation-states. At the same time, these two superpowers also have shared interests. We seek to understand the changing relationships between the U.S. and China, and what both competition and possible cooperation between their governments mean for others. American business leaders may be caught between two governments with conflicting interests. Business leaders in other countries may be caught among three governments: America, China, and their home-country government. This is a course not about China per se, but instead about the interactions between these two superpowers' governments and policies.We will look at the U.S.-China relationship by unpacking and examining distinct elements, devoting 1 or 2 class sessions on each topic.Relying in part on guests with practical expertise in some element of the U.S.-China relationship, our goals are to understand:* The most significant changes in Chinese policy direction in the Xi era;* Changes among Western leaders' policy approaches as they have realized their 50-year-old policy toward China either was wrong or is now out-of-date;* What the strategic competition label might mean and how it could translate into specific policy changes in both countries;* What opportunities exist for cooperation and mutual benefit despite strategic competition;* How China might try to change the post-WWII international rules and organizations;* How leaders of global businesses, in the U.S., China, and other countries, are caught between these two governments;* What decoupling in certain industries might mean; and* Possible ways to think about these issues as the U.S.-China relationship evolves.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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