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1 - 9 of 9 results for: GLOBAL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GLOBAL 50C: At Home Abroad Seminar: Global Gastronomies and Multicultural Cooking Class (DLCL 50C)

Global Gastronomies and Multicultural Cooking Class, organized by the At Home Abroad (AHA) House. Course meets in Department Room. Course fees are $90 per student; open to undergraduate students only. To enroll, please complete the application form ( https://forms.gle/uzipf6fVK63AJnGw6) by March 15, 2024. If you are selected to enroll in the course, you will receive an enrollment code by March 22, 2024.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 9 times (up to 18 units total)
Instructors: Lazic, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 104: Iranian Cuisine

Course offers an introductory look at Iranian cooking and cuisine. Through weekly themes and the preparation of dishes, students will learn about the history of Iranian cuisine, essential ingredients, and general cooking techniques. Guest chefs will lead cooking sessions. Class begins the second week of the quarter and meets for eight consecutive weeks. Apply to enroll by March 15, 2024 using this form ( http://goto.stanford.edu/iraniancuisine). Selected students will receive an enrollment code by March 22, 2024. Enrollment priority will be given to Global Studies UG minors with the Iranian Studies specialization. This class will be held in an R&DE Training Kitchen to be announced. Enrolled student will received further direction regarding the location.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Milani, A. (PI)

GLOBAL 111: South Asia at Stanford

This course provides an introduction to the many disciplines and scholars at Stanford focusing on South Asia. Over the quarter we will learn about the literatures, histories, languages, arts, religions, politics, and economies of this diverse region. Examples are Queer South Asia via cinema and Student politics in Indian universities 60s/70s.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 1 times (up to 1 units total)

GLOBAL 121L: Understanding Modern India

India has experienced robust economic growth in recent years. However, certain fundamental drawbacks have held it back from attaining its maximum potential. Following India's Independence, certain actions have been taken to address foundational issues, though more needs to be done on an urgent basis. The unique characteristics of India have made the country a subject of extensive thought. So, how does one look to chart a deeper understanding of India? Understanding how India is unique is a critical part of getting at the root causes of India's current level of development. The future of India stands on the bedrock of the history of India. From an inward-looking economy relying on import substitution and characterized by a massive and inefficient state,largely controlled the private enterprise, to the 5th largest economy in the world, India's story calls for telling and retelling from different vantage points. The sheer scale of India has made its continued domestic and international de more »
India has experienced robust economic growth in recent years. However, certain fundamental drawbacks have held it back from attaining its maximum potential. Following India's Independence, certain actions have been taken to address foundational issues, though more needs to be done on an urgent basis. The unique characteristics of India have made the country a subject of extensive thought. So, how does one look to chart a deeper understanding of India? Understanding how India is unique is a critical part of getting at the root causes of India's current level of development. The future of India stands on the bedrock of the history of India. From an inward-looking economy relying on import substitution and characterized by a massive and inefficient state,largely controlled the private enterprise, to the 5th largest economy in the world, India's story calls for telling and retelling from different vantage points. The sheer scale of India has made its continued domestic and international development even more time-critical and given the current climate of increasing geopolitical tension, this course aims to provide students with an understanding of modern India and the factors that will determine its positioning relative to increasing geopolitical tensions and business opportunities across Asia and globally.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GLOBAL 191: Undergraduate Directed Reading

Independent studies for undergraduate students under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 25 units total)

GLOBAL 193: History of World Cinema III: Queer Cinemas around the World (ARTHIST 164, ARTHIST 364, CSRE 102C, CSRE 302C, FEMGEN 100C, FEMGEN 300C, FILMEDIA 100C, FILMEDIA 300C, GLOBAL 390, TAPS 100C, TAPS 300C)

Provides an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor. This term's topic, Queer Cinemas around the World, engages with a range of queer cinematic forms and queer spectatorial practices in different parts of the world, as well as BIPOC media from North America. Through film and video from Kenya, Malaysia, India, The Dominican Republic, China, Brazil, Palestine, Japan, Morocco, the US etc., we will examine varied narratives about trans experience, same-sex desire, LGBTQI2S+ rights, censorship, precarity, and hopefulness. This course will attune us to regional cultural specificities in queer expression and representation, prompting us to move away from hegemonic and homogenizing understandings of queer life and media. Notes: Screenings will be held on Fridays at 1:30PM in Oshman Hall. Screening times will vary slightly from week to week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)

GLOBAL 199: Capstone Project: Global Studies Minor

Students completing a capstone project for the Global Studies Minor must enroll in this course for units (1-5) with their capstone advisor selected as the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit, with advisor approval. Students are expected to participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 5 units total)

GLOBAL 249C: Contemporary Iranian Theater (COMPLIT 249C)

Today, Iranian plays both in traditional and contemporary styles are staged in theater festivals throughout the world and play their role in forming a universal language of theater which combine the heritages from countries in all five continents. Despite many obstacles, some Iranian plays have been translated into English and some prominent Iranian figures are successful stage directors outside Iran. Forty-six years ago when "Theater in Iran" (a monograph on the history of Iranian plays) by Bahram Beyzaie was first published, it put the then contemporary Iranian theater movement "which was altogether westernizing itself blindly" face to face with a new kind of self-awareness. Hence, today's generation of playwrights and stage directors in Iran, all know something of their theatrical heritage. In this course we will spend some class sessions on the history of theater in Iran and some class meetings will be concentrating on contemporary movements and present day playwrights. Given the d more »
Today, Iranian plays both in traditional and contemporary styles are staged in theater festivals throughout the world and play their role in forming a universal language of theater which combine the heritages from countries in all five continents. Despite many obstacles, some Iranian plays have been translated into English and some prominent Iranian figures are successful stage directors outside Iran. Forty-six years ago when "Theater in Iran" (a monograph on the history of Iranian plays) by Bahram Beyzaie was first published, it put the then contemporary Iranian theater movement "which was altogether westernizing itself blindly" face to face with a new kind of self-awareness. Hence, today's generation of playwrights and stage directors in Iran, all know something of their theatrical heritage. In this course we will spend some class sessions on the history of theater in Iran and some class meetings will be concentrating on contemporary movements and present day playwrights. Given the dearth of visual documents, an attempt will be made to present a picture of Iranian theater to the student. Students are expected to read the recommended available translated plays of the contemporary Iranian playwrights and participate in classroom discussions. NOTE: To satisfy WAYS requirements, you must enroll in the course for a minimum of 3 units. Please contact your academic advisor for more information regarding University WAYS requirements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Beyzaie, B. (PI)

GLOBAL 390: History of World Cinema III: Queer Cinemas around the World (ARTHIST 164, ARTHIST 364, CSRE 102C, CSRE 302C, FEMGEN 100C, FEMGEN 300C, FILMEDIA 100C, FILMEDIA 300C, GLOBAL 193, TAPS 100C, TAPS 300C)

Provides an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor. This term's topic, Queer Cinemas around the World, engages with a range of queer cinematic forms and queer spectatorial practices in different parts of the world, as well as BIPOC media from North America. Through film and video from Kenya, Malaysia, India, The Dominican Republic, China, Brazil, Palestine, Japan, Morocco, the US etc., we will examine varied narratives about trans experience, same-sex desire, LGBTQI2S+ rights, censorship, precarity, and hopefulness. This course will attune us to regional cultural specificities in queer expression and representation, prompting us to move away from hegemonic and homogenizing understandings of queer life and media. Notes: Screenings will be held on Fridays at 1:30PM in Oshman Hall. Screening times will vary slightly from week to week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)
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