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1 - 10 of 36 results for: ENGR ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41. When signing up for this course make sure to sign up both for the lecture and for a Discussion Section.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ENGR 21: Engineering of Systems

A high-level look at techniques for analyzing and designing complex, multidisciplinary engineering systems, such as aircraft, spacecraft, automobiles, power plants, cellphones, robots, biomedical devices, and many others. The need for multi-level design, modeling and simulation approaches, computation-based design, and hardware and software-in-the-loop simulations will be demonstrated through a variety of examples and case studies. Several aspects of system engineering will be applied to the design of large-scale interacting systems and contrasted with subsystems such as hydraulic systems, electrical systems, and brake systems. The use of design-thinking, story-boarding, mockups, sensitivity analysis, simulation, team-based design, and the development of presentation skills will be fostered through several realistic examples in several fields of engineering.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kontinos, D. (PI)

ENGR 42: Introduction to Electromagnetics and Its Applications (EE 42)

Electricity and magnetism and its essential role in modern electrical engineering devices and systems, such as sensors, displays, DVD players, and optical communication systems. The topics that will be covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, one-dimensional wave equation, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines, and one-dimensional resonators. Pre-requisites: none.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Solgaard, O. (PI)

ENGR 50: Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis

The structure, bonding, and atomic arrangements in materials leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic and mechanical behavior, emphasizing nanotechnology, solid state devices, and advanced structural and composite materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Sinclair, R. (PI)

ENGR 60: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (CEE 146S)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3

ENGR 65: Modern Physics for Engineers (EE 65)

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell's demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

ENGR 76: Information Science and Engineering

What is information? How can we measure and efficiently represent it? How can we reliably communicate and store it over media prone to noise and errors? How can we make sound decisions based on partial and noisy information? This course introduces the basic notions required to address these questions, as well as the principles and techniques underlying the design of modern information, communication, and decision-making systems with relations to and applications in machine-learning, through genomics, to neuroscience. Students will get a hands-on appreciation of the concepts via projects in small groups, where they will develop their own systems for streaming of multi-media data under human-centric performance criteria. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Ozgur, A. (PI)

ENGR 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (BIOE 80)

Students completing BIOE 80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); constraints limiting what life can do; and possible health challenges in 2030. And we explore questions like, how does what we want shape bioengineering, and who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR

ENGR 100: Teaching Public Speaking

The theory and practice of teaching public speaking and presentation development. Lectures/discussions on developing an instructional plan, using audiovisual equipment for instruction, devising tutoring techniques, and teaching delivery, organization, audience analysis, visual aids, and unique speaking situations. Weekly practice speaking. Students serve as apprentice speech tutors. Those completing course may become paid speech instructors in the Technical Communications Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 102W: Technical and Professional Communication (CEE 102W)

Effective communication skills will help you advance quickly. Learn the best technical and professional techniques in writing and speaking. Group workshops and individual conferences with instructors. Designed for undergraduates going into industry. Allowed to fulfill WIM for Atmosphere/Energy, Engineering Physics, and Environmental Systems Engineering majors only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Harrison, K. (PI)
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