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1 - 10 of 46 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 11: Introduction to Dance Studies (DANCE 11, FEMGEN 11, TAPS 11)

This class is an introduction to dance studies and the complex meanings bodily performances carry both onstage and off. Using critical frames drawn from dance criticism, history and ethnography and performance studies, and readings from cultural studies, dance, theater and critical theory, the class explores how performing bodies make meanings. We will read theoretical and historical texts and recorded dance as a means of developing tools for viewing and analyzing dance and understanding its place in larger social, cultural, and political structures. Special attention will be given to new turns in queer and feminist dance studies. This course blends theory and embodied practice. This means as we read, research, and analyze, we will also dance. Students enrolled should expect to move throughout the quarter and complete a two-part choreographic research project. TAPS 11 has been certified to fulfill the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Jones, T. (PI)

CSRE 51Q: Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity (AMSTUD 51Q, COMPLIT 51Q)

Explorations of how literature can represent in complex and compelling ways issues of difference--how they appear, are debated, or silenced. Specific attention on learning how to read critically in ways that lead one to appreciate the power of literary texts, and learning to formulate your ideas into arguments. Course is a Sophomore Seminar and satisfies Write2. By application only
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, Writing 2, WAY-EDP

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Selznick, L. (PI)

CSRE 74: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47, HISTORY 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. HISTORY 47 is 3 units; HISTORY 147 is 5 units.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-EDP

CSRE 101B: Institutions and Inequities

This course offers frameworks for understanding institutional racism, racial capitalism, and the historical and contemporary ways through which these forces reinforce and maintain racial inequity across a variety of social sectors (e.g., health, media, education, criminal justice, and the environment). At the end of this course, students will be able to identify how race is institutionalized, how racialized institutions are interconnected, and how institutional violence can be combated.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

CSRE 101C: Resistance and Liberation

This course investigates strategies for racial and economic liberation by analyzing past and present social justice movements. Students will be exposed to theoretical frameworks for liberation (e.g., abolition, resistance, mutual aid, rematriation) and engage with how they are applied. At the end of this course, students will better understand how liberation can be achieved and will be able to apply anti-racist theory to their work at Stanford and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP

CSRE 102C: History of World Cinema III: Queer Cinemas around the World (ARTHIST 164, ARTHIST 364, CSRE 302C, FEMGEN 100C, FEMGEN 300C, FILMEDIA 100C, FILMEDIA 300C, GLOBAL 193, GLOBAL 390, TAPS 100C, TAPS 300C)

Provides an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor. This term's topic, Queer Cinemas around the World, engages with a range of queer cinematic forms and queer spectatorial practices in different parts of the world, as well as BIPOC media from North America. Through film and video from Kenya, Malaysia, India, The Dominican Republic, China, Brazil, Palestine, Japan, Morocco, the US etc., we will examine varied narratives about trans experience, same-sex desire, LGBTQI2S+ rights, censorship, precarity, and hopefulness. This course will attune us to regional cultural specificities in queer expression and representation, prompting us to move away from hegemonic and homogenizing understandings of queer life and media. Notes: Screenings will be held on Fridays at 1:30PM in Oshman Hall. Screening times will vary slightly from week to week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)

CSRE 103S: Indigenous Feminisms (AMSTUD 103, FEMGEN 103S, NATIVEAM 103S)

"Indigenous womxn, trans folk, queers stand at the forefront of the larger decolonial movement to reclaim previous subjectivities and to build bright collective futures?we continually envision and push for a world void of structures such as settler-colonialism, imperialism, capitalism, racism, fascism, and heteropatriarchy." ? "Settler Sexuality on Stolen Land: Capitalism, Imperialism, & Race," Settler Sexuality: Resistance to State-Sanctioned Violence, Reclamation of Anti-Colonial Knowledges and Liberation for All: An Indigenous Feminist Zine. Indigenous Feminism/s and Queer Indigenous Studies seek to alter major disciplinary questions in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) in order to account for the significant lifeworlds and experiences of Native women and Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer individuals. This course explores how the subdisciplines confront WGSS with significant critiques of settler sexualities and white heteropatriarchy, emphasizing the literary and cultural productio more »
"Indigenous womxn, trans folk, queers stand at the forefront of the larger decolonial movement to reclaim previous subjectivities and to build bright collective futures?we continually envision and push for a world void of structures such as settler-colonialism, imperialism, capitalism, racism, fascism, and heteropatriarchy." ? "Settler Sexuality on Stolen Land: Capitalism, Imperialism, & Race," Settler Sexuality: Resistance to State-Sanctioned Violence, Reclamation of Anti-Colonial Knowledges and Liberation for All: An Indigenous Feminist Zine. Indigenous Feminism/s and Queer Indigenous Studies seek to alter major disciplinary questions in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) in order to account for the significant lifeworlds and experiences of Native women and Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer individuals. This course explores how the subdisciplines confront WGSS with significant critiques of settler sexualities and white heteropatriarchy, emphasizing the literary and cultural production of Native women and 2SQ folk. Centered around readings, films, and student contributions, the course also seeks to trouble the colonized classroom by unseating settler authority in education. Students (re)imagine the possibilities of Indigenous liberation oriented toward non-heteropatriarchal ways of knowledge and being in the world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Stone, P. (PI)

CSRE 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans, and feminist studies. Topics include social justice and feminist organizing, art and activism, feminist histories, the emergence of gender and sexuality studies in the academy, intersectionality and interdependence, the embodiment and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, disability, and sexuality. Includes guest lectures from faculty across the university and weekly discussion sections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI, WAY-EDP

CSRE 112X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X, URBANST 115)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-EDP
Instructors: pearman, f. (PI)
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