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1 - 10 of 32 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 21Q: Wilde's Worlds

This course introduces you to Oscar Wilde's life and works in various international literary, artistic, social, and cultural contexts in the European fin de siecle, as well as to Wilde's posthumous reception as an international iconic figure of LGBTQ+ literary and cultural history. We will consider Wilde's own roots in Irish culture; his love for Ancient Greece and Rome in the context of Oxford Hellenism; the influence of French and Belgian Decadence and Symbolism on The Picture of Dorian Gray and Salome (which we will read side by side with writings by Joris-Karl Huysmans, Stephane Mallarme, and Rachilde); Wilde's interest in the visual and decorative arts; Wilde's joyful dandyism and vibrant queer literary networks in Paris and London; the impact of Wilde's 1895 trials and imprisonment for "acts of gross indecency"; Wilde's reception in countries such as Germany, Japan, Russia, and the U.S.; and the vibrant posthumous afterlife of Wilde's work and persona in dance, opera, films, musi more »
This course introduces you to Oscar Wilde's life and works in various international literary, artistic, social, and cultural contexts in the European fin de siecle, as well as to Wilde's posthumous reception as an international iconic figure of LGBTQ+ literary and cultural history. We will consider Wilde's own roots in Irish culture; his love for Ancient Greece and Rome in the context of Oxford Hellenism; the influence of French and Belgian Decadence and Symbolism on The Picture of Dorian Gray and Salome (which we will read side by side with writings by Joris-Karl Huysmans, Stephane Mallarme, and Rachilde); Wilde's interest in the visual and decorative arts; Wilde's joyful dandyism and vibrant queer literary networks in Paris and London; the impact of Wilde's 1895 trials and imprisonment for "acts of gross indecency"; Wilde's reception in countries such as Germany, Japan, Russia, and the U.S.; and the vibrant posthumous afterlife of Wilde's work and persona in dance, opera, films, musicals, cartoons, and popular culture from the 1900s to today. Studying Oscar Wilde's life and works in such comparative and international contexts opens a door to the historical 1890s, while also giving us the chance to understand and appreciate Wilde's legacy as a queer artist and cultural trailblazer that still speaks to us in our own time. This course will emphasize close reading, analytical writing, and honing your presentation skills as you learn to understand and appreciate the many worlds of Oscar Wilde from the 1890s to today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2
Instructors: Dierkes, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 36A: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 36X, SLAVIC 36, TAPS 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as progress, technology, and sex, have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like cultural relativism and historical memory, play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these "dangerous" ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

COMPLIT 37Q: Zionism and the Novel (JEWISHST 37Q)

At the end of the nineteenth century, Zionism emerged as a political movement to establish a national homeland for the Jews, eventually leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. This seminar uses novels to explore the changes in Zionism, the roots of the conflict in the Middle East, and the potentials for the future. We will take a close look at novels by Israelis, both Jewish and Arab, in order to understand multiple perspectives, and we will also consider works by authors from the North America and from Europe. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 51Q: Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity (AMSTUD 51Q, CSRE 51Q)

Explorations of how literature can represent in complex and compelling ways issues of difference--how they appear, are debated, or silenced. Specific attention on learning how to read critically in ways that lead one to appreciate the power of literary texts, and learning to formulate your ideas into arguments. Course is a Sophomore Seminar and satisfies Write2. By application only
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum, Writing 2, WAY-EDP

COMPLIT 104N: Film and Fascism in Europe (FILMEDIA 105N, FRENCH 104N, ITALIAN 104N)

Controlling people's minds through propaganda is an integral part of fascist regimes' totalitarianism. In the interwar, cinema, a relatively recent mass media, was immediately seized upon by fascist regimes to produce aggrandizing national narratives, justify their expansionist and extermination policies, celebrate the myth of the "Leader," and indoctrinate the people. Yet film makers under these regimes (Rossellini, Renoir) or just after their fall, used the same media to explore and expose how they manufactured conformism, obedience, and mass murder and to interrogate fascism. We will watch films produced by or under European fascist regimes (Nazi Germany, Italy under Mussolini, Greece's Regime of the Colonels) but also against them. The seminar introduces key film analysis tools and concepts, while offering insights into the history of propaganda and cinema. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

COMPLIT 123: The Novel (DLCL 143)

This course traces the global development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones, with an emphasis on Asian, American, and African novels and innovative approaches.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 133: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to linguistic and conceptual tools to conduct literary and visual analysis. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writers and filmmakers such as Aim¿ C¿saire, Albert Memmi, Ousmane Semb¿ne, Le¿la Sebbar, Mariama B¿, Maryse Cond¿, Dany Laferri¿re, Mati Diop, and special guest L¿onora Miano. Taught in French. Students are encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or successfully test above this level through the Language Center. This course fulfills the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP, GER:DB-Hum

COMPLIT 144: The Idea of the "Poetic": Poetry and Other Arts in the Twentieth Century

In this course, we will explore the relationship between poetry and other art forms. What does it mean to say that something is "poetic," especially when we are talking about a non-poetic genre or artistic medium. Is the "poetic" a formal feature? An aesthetic quality? A stylistic choice? Or a mode of creative faculty? And does the way we talk about the "poetic" inform us of something about poetry itself? Together we will read narrative prose, photographs, films, paintings, and of course, poetry itself. Authors and artists we study might include Rainer Maria Rilke, Paul Klee, Fei Ming, Virginia Woolf, Paul Celan, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Michelango Antonioni, Andre Tarkovsky, W.G Sebald, Jia Zhangke, and Gerhard Richter.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ding, G. (PI)

COMPLIT 157: Time Travel in Abya Yala: Decolonising Time (CHILATST 157)

What if we saw time as malleable? In this course, we will examine how indigenous, latinx, and black artists manipulate experiences of time through music, visual art, and storytelling to reclaim their worlds. Understandings of time have been used to control the populations of Abya Yala (the Americas) since the beginning of the colonial period. But through different cultural understandings of time, experimental bookmaking, and other modes of creative expression, time can be experienced anew. We will pay attention to how different formats for storytelling and art alter our experience of the present. We will also identify how different ways of arranging events, visuals, and words reconfigure the relationships between the past, present, and future. The class will include fictional and theoretical works by Gloria Anzaldúa (Chicana), Manuel Tzoc (K'iche'), Patrick Chamoiseau (Martinique), Kency Cornejo (El Salvador/USA), and Dylan Robinson (Xwélmexw), amongst others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Martinez, N. (PI)

COMPLIT 161E: Narrative and Narrative Theory (ENGLISH 161)

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative. nEnglish majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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