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1 - 10 of 18 results for: BIOS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIOS 210: Cell, Gene, and Immune Therapies

The emerging therapeutic landscape has a new cast of characters' engineered cells, programmable nucleic acids, and multi-valent antibodies' to name a few. This lecture-based course will provide an overview of these new therapeutic modalities, the basic science guiding their development, and a discussion of new regulatory and safety challenges that emerge in these modalities. As a final project, students will produce a report spanning the preclinical and clinical development of a new therapy. Examples include CRISPR-edited cell therapies, bispecific T cell engagers, in vivo CRISPR base editors, and antisense oligo therapies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

BIOS 218: The Evolution of Evolvability

In evolutionary theory, the standard 'fitness' considers the operation of selection over a single generation. Some researchers use a poorly-quantified term, 'evolvability', to describe the latent ability of organisms to evolve over multiple generations. Does evolvability itself evolve? Can we tease apart the concepts of short-term fitness and long-term evolvability? Can we quantitatively define a 'long-term fitness' that is as general and practical as the standard fitness? What entities (individuals? genotypes? species?) can be said to possess evolvability? This seminar will debate these questions as we study papers ranging from theoretical biology, to concepts in "evo-devo", to recent experimental work in microbiology and in silico models.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Palmer, M. (PI)

BIOS 225: Diversity and Inclusion in STEMM

Introduction to the social science literature on factors contributing to gender disparities in the scientific workplace (e.g. implicit bias and stereotype threat). Discussions focus on steps that individuals and institutions can take to promote the advancement of women and other underrepresented groups in science, and thus promote the advancement of science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Goodman, M. (PI)

BIOS 229: Open Source Prototyping: Translating Ideas to Reality using Rapid Prototyping Methods

"Open Source Prototyping" is a hands-on course that equips students with the skills and knowledge to use open-source design tools and rapid prototyping technologies, such as 3D printing and CNC. Students will learn how to translate their ideas into real-world objects, understanding the full process from ideation to realization. Key topics include navigation of leading design software, 3D printing technologies, and in-depth understanding of materials science. The course emphasizes open-source principles, and their applications in additive manufacturing. It features a wide range of applications, including medical devices, lab equipment, and experimental apparatuses, providing a comprehensive look at prototyping potential.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Wang, B. (PI)

BIOS 236: Developmental Biology in the Ocean: Comparative Embryology and Larval Development

Three-week course at Hopkins Marine Station. Focuses on the embryology and larval development of a broad range of marine invertebrate phyla. The goal of the course is to give students an appreciation of the range of developmental strategies and larval forms in the ocean and why this is critical for constructing hypotheses of EvoDevo and animal evolution. Includes observation and documentation of the development of embryos and larvae by scientific illustration and photo/video microscopy. Pre-requisite: Developmental Biology coursework and instructor consent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Lowe, C. (PI)

BIOS 251: Explorations on the Culture of Science, Science Identity, and Society

This course will examine the historical and contemporary roles that the cultural norms and practices across STEM domains (¿Culture of Science¿) have played in advancing persistent gender and racial/ethnic STEM inequities in the postsecondary context and beyond. By doing so this course will allow students to employ an interdisciplinary lens to begin to critically explore the impact that "Culture of Science" may have on the development and expression an individual's "Science Identity".
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Vassel, F. (PI)

BIOS 263: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Fellowships

Graduate students in the Biosciences PhD Programs develop a fellowship proposal (e.g. NIH F31) focusing on required documents: 1-page specific aims as well as research and career development plans. Students establish a writing practice and learn fundamental grant writing skills through guided exercises, including in-class review and focused faculty feedback.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 20 units total)

BIOS 268: Biology and Applications of CRISPR/Cas9: Genome Editing and Epigenome Modifications (GENE 268)

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the biology and applications of the revolutionary CRISPR/Cas9 system, with detailed exploration of several areas: / / --Basic biology of the CRISPR/Cas9 system / --High-throughput screening using CRISPR/Cas9 / --Epigenetic modifications and transcriptional regulation using dCas9 / --Therapeutic applications of gene editing with CRISPR / --Disease modeling with CRISPR / --Ethical considerations of the use of CRISPR/Cas9 / / The course will be geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students, and will assume a basic background in molecular biology and genetics. The course will be lecture-based, with frequent opportunities for discussion and questions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

BIOS 299: Online Proposal Bootcamp

This 9-week Proposal Bootcamp guides grant writers through the process of developing a compelling fellowship (e.g., NIH F31, F32) or career development award (e.g., NIH K99/R00, K01, K08, etc.). Participants gain new grant writing skills through synchronous, including Mini Lectures and Grant Coach Office Hours, and asynchronous, including recorded videos and readings, activities. Students and postdocs join our award-winning peer review program for feedback on key proposal documents. This Bootcamp is 100% remote and open to all Stanford affiliates.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

BIOS 302: Designing Your Life: Empowering Emerging Scientists

Design a fulfilling and impactful vision for your career and life as a whole. The primary purpose of the class is to develop a perspective and align your attitudes, actions and experiences with your values, priorities, and your own ultimate definition of victory for living an extraordinary life. A practical guide for career development, this class will provide training through conversations, self-analysis, and writing exercises on career direction, communication, and the development and leveraging of relationships skills that are central to success in any career as a scientist. We will examine what it means (and what it takes) to succeed in a variety of life domains, including money, health, career, relationships, and physical fitness as well as personal growth. We will dig into the darker side of being human, exploring phenomena like negative character traits, fears, hauntings, and regrets. Ultimately, we want you to gain insight into who you are, what you want most, and how you might more »
Design a fulfilling and impactful vision for your career and life as a whole. The primary purpose of the class is to develop a perspective and align your attitudes, actions and experiences with your values, priorities, and your own ultimate definition of victory for living an extraordinary life. A practical guide for career development, this class will provide training through conversations, self-analysis, and writing exercises on career direction, communication, and the development and leveraging of relationships skills that are central to success in any career as a scientist. We will examine what it means (and what it takes) to succeed in a variety of life domains, including money, health, career, relationships, and physical fitness as well as personal growth. We will dig into the darker side of being human, exploring phenomena like negative character traits, fears, hauntings, and regrets. Ultimately, we want you to gain insight into who you are, what you want most, and how you might inadvertently and unwittingly get in your own way. We want you to learn how to confront the most vexing issues in your life, learn from them, and eventually transform your relationship to them. Course Structure: The course consists of ten intensive, flipped-classroom sessions designed to help you develop the skills and knowledge--and, more importantly, the insight and capacity--to be more strategic and effective in how you lead your life. It requires a willingness to be introspective and to consider personal feedback and constructive confrontation. Enrollment is capped at 30 learners, all of whom will be provided subscriptions to Inner.U which will serve as an electronic textbook and supported by a team of three faculty facilitators.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1
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