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1 - 6 of 6 results for: AFRICAST ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAST 115: Excavating Enslavement (AFRICAST 215)

This is a project-based course, intended to scaffold a joint initiative, Aftermaths of Enslavement: curating legacies publicly. Both course and project seek to better understand enslaved pasts by (a) curating materials that advance scholarly research, using technologies that maximize access and utility; and (b) by developing learning materials for schools and popular audiences by working with heritage professionals and teachers. The focus is on the Indian Ocean World, particularly the Cape (South Africa) and Mauritius, within global and comparative frameworks. Readings for each week will juxtapose Cape and other slave systems. Project partners and other guests will join individual sessions. Students unable to attend the sessions should contact the instructor to discuss asynchronous alternatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

AFRICAST 132: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 133, COMPLIT 133, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to linguistic and conceptual tools to conduct literary and visual analysis. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writers and filmmakers such as Aim¿ C¿saire, Albert Memmi, Ousmane Semb¿ne, Le¿la Sebbar, Mariama B¿, Maryse Cond¿, Dany Laferri¿re, Mati Diop, and special guest L¿onora Miano. Taught in French. Students are encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or successfully test above this level through the Language Center. This course fulfills the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-EDP

AFRICAST 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs, Democracy, Development and Environmental Justice (AFRICAST 242, CSRE 142C, INTNLREL 142, URBANST 135)

This community-engaged learning class is part of a broader collaboration between the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Haas Center for Public Service, Distinguished Visitors Program and the Doerr School of Sustainability, using practice to better inform theory about how innovation can help address society's biggest challenges with a particular focus on environmental justice, sustainability and climate resilience for frontline and marginalized communities who have or will experience environmental harms. Working with the instructor and the 2024 Distinguished Visitors ? Angela McKee-Brown, founder and CEO of Project Reflect; Jason Su, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy; Cecilia Taylor, founder, executive director, and CEO of Belle Haven Action; and Violet Wulf-Saena, founder and executive director of Climate Resilient Communities ? students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrep more »
This community-engaged learning class is part of a broader collaboration between the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Haas Center for Public Service, Distinguished Visitors Program and the Doerr School of Sustainability, using practice to better inform theory about how innovation can help address society's biggest challenges with a particular focus on environmental justice, sustainability and climate resilience for frontline and marginalized communities who have or will experience environmental harms. Working with the instructor and the 2024 Distinguished Visitors ? Angela McKee-Brown, founder and CEO of Project Reflect; Jason Su, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy; Cecilia Taylor, founder, executive director, and CEO of Belle Haven Action; and Violet Wulf-Saena, founder and executive director of Climate Resilient Communities ? students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, race, systemic inequities, democracy and justice. This course interrogates approaches like design theory, measuring impact, fundraising, leadership, storytelling, and policy advocacy with the Distinguished Visitors providing practical examples from their work on how this theory plays out in practice. This is a community-engaged learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning. Graduate and undergraduate students may enroll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Janus, K. (PI)

AFRICAST 202: Moving the Message: Reading and embodying the works of bell hooks (CSRE 202, DANCE 122, ENGLISH 287, FEMGEN 201)

In this course, we will spend time reading, discussing and embodying the work of Black feminist theorist and teacher bell hooks. hook's work focuses on practices rooted in Black feminism, the role of love in revolutionary politics, rescuing ourselves and each other from hegemonic forces, and building the components necessary for a life of liberatory politics. Through a process grounded in movement improvisation, creative writing and expression we will explore how the words and theories of bell hooks can literally move us towards freedom and self recovery. This course is presented by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts, IDA.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

AFRICAST 215: Excavating Enslavement (AFRICAST 115)

This is a project-based course, intended to scaffold a joint initiative, Aftermaths of Enslavement: curating legacies publicly. Both course and project seek to better understand enslaved pasts by (a) curating materials that advance scholarly research, using technologies that maximize access and utility; and (b) by developing learning materials for schools and popular audiences by working with heritage professionals and teachers. The focus is on the Indian Ocean World, particularly the Cape (South Africa) and Mauritius, within global and comparative frameworks. Readings for each week will juxtapose Cape and other slave systems. Project partners and other guests will join individual sessions. Students unable to attend the sessions should contact the instructor to discuss asynchronous alternatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

AFRICAST 242: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs, Democracy, Development and Environmental Justice (AFRICAST 142, CSRE 142C, INTNLREL 142, URBANST 135)

This community-engaged learning class is part of a broader collaboration between the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Haas Center for Public Service, Distinguished Visitors Program and the Doerr School of Sustainability, using practice to better inform theory about how innovation can help address society's biggest challenges with a particular focus on environmental justice, sustainability and climate resilience for frontline and marginalized communities who have or will experience environmental harms. Working with the instructor and the 2024 Distinguished Visitors ? Angela McKee-Brown, founder and CEO of Project Reflect; Jason Su, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy; Cecilia Taylor, founder, executive director, and CEO of Belle Haven Action; and Violet Wulf-Saena, founder and executive director of Climate Resilient Communities ? students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrep more »
This community-engaged learning class is part of a broader collaboration between the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Haas Center for Public Service, Distinguished Visitors Program and the Doerr School of Sustainability, using practice to better inform theory about how innovation can help address society's biggest challenges with a particular focus on environmental justice, sustainability and climate resilience for frontline and marginalized communities who have or will experience environmental harms. Working with the instructor and the 2024 Distinguished Visitors ? Angela McKee-Brown, founder and CEO of Project Reflect; Jason Su, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy; Cecilia Taylor, founder, executive director, and CEO of Belle Haven Action; and Violet Wulf-Saena, founder and executive director of Climate Resilient Communities ? students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, race, systemic inequities, democracy and justice. This course interrogates approaches like design theory, measuring impact, fundraising, leadership, storytelling, and policy advocacy with the Distinguished Visitors providing practical examples from their work on how this theory plays out in practice. This is a community-engaged learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning. Graduate and undergraduate students may enroll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Janus, K. (PI)
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