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201 - 210 of 293 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 139S: Sport and Exercise Medicine

This is an upper division course with a common theme of injury as well as injury prevention in sport and physical activity. The topics include the treatment and evaluation of common sports injuries and illnesses for both musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal/medical conditions. Students will also develop critical reading and thinking skills. Classes will incorporate didactic lectures, critical analysis of sports medicine literature, as well as hand-on labs incorporating current sports medicine injury evaluation tools. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 151R: Biology, Health and Big Data

We are living in the midst of a revolution in the accessibility and availability of biological and medical data. How can all this data be used to improve human health? In this course, students will look at case studies from diabetes and cancer research to learn how to access publicly available data ranging from gene or protein level datasets to information about clinical trials. Students will apply what they learn from the case studies to develop a research proposal and presentation on a biology-related topic of their choice. The class will have a small group workshop-type format. Students will gain skills in research methods including accessing, analyzing and presenting data. There will be exercises using the R programming language. Prior programming experience is not required. nPrerequisites: HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 3A or BIO 82 and BIO 83 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Salmeen, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 153: Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges

We will learn about parasitic and other pestilence of public health importance and how they affect billions of people worldwide. We examine the pathogenesis, clinical syndromes, complex life cycles, and the interplay among environment, vectors, hosts, and reservoirs; we explore historical contexts as it informs current interventions and programming against disease. Public health policy initiatives aimed at halting disease transmission are viewed critically through the lens of researchers, public health level initiatives, popular media (TV and movies) and individual patients with these diseases. There will be guest visitors who have experienced these diseases and we will hear from several researchers and experts working on the challenges of controlling, eliminating or even eradicating these diseases. We will become familiar with the targeted diseases of the World Health Organization tropical disease research list, including river blindness, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, schistosomia more »
We will learn about parasitic and other pestilence of public health importance and how they affect billions of people worldwide. We examine the pathogenesis, clinical syndromes, complex life cycles, and the interplay among environment, vectors, hosts, and reservoirs; we explore historical contexts as it informs current interventions and programming against disease. Public health policy initiatives aimed at halting disease transmission are viewed critically through the lens of researchers, public health level initiatives, popular media (TV and movies) and individual patients with these diseases. There will be guest visitors who have experienced these diseases and we will hear from several researchers and experts working on the challenges of controlling, eliminating or even eradicating these diseases. We will become familiar with the targeted diseases of the World Health Organization tropical disease research list, including river blindness, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, mycobacterial disease (tuberculosis and leprosy), malaria, toxoplasmosis, dracunculiasis, and intestinal helminthes. There will be a lab section for "hands on" learning and viewing of parasites. Interactive sessions will involve teaching each other about these biological forces of nature that invade humans. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 158: Building Blocks for Chronic Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A)

Researchers have come a long way in developing therapies for chronic disease but a gap remains between current solutions and the ability to address the disease in full. This course provides an overview to the underlying biology of many of these diseases and how they may connect to each other. A "think outside of the box" approach to drug discovery is needed to bridge such a gap in solutions, and this course teaches the building blocks for that approach. Could Legoland provide the answer? This is a guest lecture series with original contributions from prominent thought leaders in academia and industry. Interaction between students and guest lecturers is expected. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 159: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (EPI 238)

(Formerly HRP 238) The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. In academic year 2020-21, a letter grade or a `CR¿ grade will satisfy the Ways requirement. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 160: Human Behavioral Biology (BIO 150)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 180: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual's age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

Phonetics is the systematic study of speech. In this class, we will learn about the physical gestures and timing involved in the articulation of spoken language and about the resulting acoustic signal that is decoded into linguistic units by the human auditory system. The class is structured into two parts: A practical lab component, and a class component. This course highlights both the complexity of the physical nature of producing spoken language, and the highly variable acoustic signal that is interpreted by listeners as language. By the end of this course, you should: (1) Understand the process of preparing an utterance to articulating it; (2) Understand the basic acoustic properties of speech; (3) Provide detailed phonetic transcriptions of speech; (4) Produce and understand the gestures involved in nearly all of the world's speech sounds, and (5) Understand the ways this knowledge can be used to advance our understanding of spoken language understanding by humans and machines. We will be using the software program Praat (https://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/) weekly, beginning on the first day of class. Please download the program and have it installed on your computer before class begins.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SMA

MATH 80Q: Capillary Surfaces: Explored and Unexplored Territory

Preference to sophomores. Capillary surfaces: the interfaces between fluids that are adjacent to each other and do not mix. Recently discovered phenomena, predicted mathematically and subsequently confirmed by experiments, some done in space shuttles. Interested students may participate in ongoing investigations with affinity between mathematics and physics.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 31: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (CHEM 31M)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and more »
A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions will include the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials with the same composition (for example: diamond, graphite, graphene). There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, and an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2020 General Chemistry Placement Test before Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Generally students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 or higher place into 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are also welcome to take the Autumn 2020 Chemistry 33 Placement Test to see if Chem33 is a more appropriate placement. Same as: MATSCI 31
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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