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101 - 110 of 151 results for: ARTSTUDI

ARTSTUDI 247A: Art Book Object (ARTSTUDI 147)

This mixed introductory and upper level studio course explores contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object. Students learn to use both traditional and digital tools and techniques for creating artists' books, and integrate those into final works of art. The course familiarizes students with basic bookbinding processes and forms, as well as various modes of printing and production that facilitate limited artist editions. In addition to making books, we view numerous artists' books in the Bowes Art & Architecture Library collection as well as the collection of the instructor, and meet with practicing artists and book makers. Students create a number of small books, each focused on a particular process but using content of their choice. Upper level students propose and create a more fully evolved final project involving at least one bookbinding process independently researched in consultation with the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 248P: The Hybrid Print (ARTSTUDI 148P)

This class explores experimental printmaking methods where digital and traditional practices collide. It focuses on the interchange between conventional and new methods of printmaking, and possibilities for the print beyond paper and the flat picture plane in contemporary art. Techniques will be demonstrated in class, and students will pursue projects using these techniques, developing their own conceptual interests. We will explore digital processes using large format printers, as well as digitally augmented traditional printmaking methods such as monoprints, collographs, woodblock and linocut, aided by dye sublimation, vinyl cutting, and 3-d printing. Students will have access to a wide array of both digital and traditional tools, and will develop projects using a combination of methods, resulting in a body of work. Discussions will address the expansive nature of contemporary fine art printmaking.
| UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 249: Major Capstone

This course aims to prepare senior Art Practice majors for future artistic careers by developing rigorous practice and critical research and presentation skills. Class engagement includes informal discussions, written reflections, and critiques with professionals in the field. Students will create meaningful work for the Senior Art Exhibition and generate further opportunities for themselves in project funding, residencies, exhibitions, commissions, and graduate education.nnCourse for Art Practice majors only. Art Practice minors may interview for possible inclusion. (upper level)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Calm, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 250: Individual Work: Sculpture

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Student Services Specialist in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Berlier, T. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 252: Sculpture II

Builds upon 151. Installation and non-studio pieces. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for the studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers. (upper level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: Hemenway, D. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 254: Kinetic Sculpture

This course is focused on developing a practical, hands on understanding of kinetic mechanisms applied to objects and materials in sculpture and installation. Class time will take the form of lectures and technical demos, and hands-on labs where you will be exposed to different strategies for making movement in the physical world. Topics investigated include Rube Goldberg machines, devices of wonder, interactivity, audience experience and participation.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

ARTSTUDI 255: Sonic Crossroads

Through the history of music, sound art, acoustic ecology, literature, film, visual arts and performance, this course will examine the territory where sound meets space, sight, symbol, ritual, activism, self consciousness and language. Students will engage in conversations, experiments and exercises that will enhance their awareness of the sonic phenomena and the ¿time canvas¿ as a space of creation and communication.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTSTUDI 256: Advanced Installation

This hands on studio based sculpture course focuses on developing concepts, and creating a site-specific installation art project. This class will addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Students will make 3-4 projects that will culminate in a final site-specific installation. We will look at contemporary artists working in the field of installation art. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, field trips and visiting artists will augment the class. Installation Art is based on the merger of Space and Time and on a relationship between the artist and the visitor. Utilizing your interests and abilities in a variety of subjects and media, you will more »
This hands on studio based sculpture course focuses on developing concepts, and creating a site-specific installation art project. This class will addresses the impact of material and technique upon form and content; therefore understanding the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Conceptual and technical considerations will be addressed. Students will learn traditional building techniques as needed (wood shop, metal shop, mold making, found object) as well as anti-object techniques. Students will make 3-4 projects that will culminate in a final site-specific installation. We will look at contemporary artists working in the field of installation art. Group discussions, critiques, readings, video presentations, field trips and visiting artists will augment the class. Installation Art is based on the merger of Space and Time and on a relationship between the artist and the visitor. Utilizing your interests and abilities in a variety of subjects and media, you will create environments that immerse the viewer in a sensory/ intellectual/ emotional experience. The material and methods you use can range from everyday objects, to highly personalized forms, from appropriated sounds to surveillance video, from large wall drawings to interactive switches for the participant to manipulate. The class will consist of demonstrations of art skills particularly useful in installation (sculptural, video, audio, interactive media, etc), presentations by the professor, research and reports and journal entries, and weekly critique. Installation Art is a pervasive, varied, global practice for art-making that acts as a gathering place for expression in all media addressing all subjects in a wide range of styles by broad grouping of artists."
| Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

ARTSTUDI 256V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (TAPS 156V, TAPS 256V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The serie more »
The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTSTUDI 257: Advanced Sculpture Seminar

Students engage in professional sculpture (studio) practices that prepare them to apply and extend the skills, methods and techniques they have learned in previous courses, including technical and conceptual skills in woodworking, metal working, mold making, and other sculptural production. These practices involve working collaboratively, taking on short-term projects, handling an increased sculpture work flow, actively participating in regular critiques, and contributing to and showing work in a small final exhibition. Students refine their aesthetic, tap the interdisciplinary network of influences they have built, and work independently to become adept at presenting their ideas and building a portfolio to show the art they have produced to potential clients in a 'real world' professional context. Anyone interested in taking this class should apply with a project in mind that they aim to develop over the length of the course. Since these projects will require a considerable amount of more »
Students engage in professional sculpture (studio) practices that prepare them to apply and extend the skills, methods and techniques they have learned in previous courses, including technical and conceptual skills in woodworking, metal working, mold making, and other sculptural production. These practices involve working collaboratively, taking on short-term projects, handling an increased sculpture work flow, actively participating in regular critiques, and contributing to and showing work in a small final exhibition. Students refine their aesthetic, tap the interdisciplinary network of influences they have built, and work independently to become adept at presenting their ideas and building a portfolio to show the art they have produced to potential clients in a 'real world' professional context. Anyone interested in taking this class should apply with a project in mind that they aim to develop over the length of the course. Since these projects will require a considerable amount of independent work outside class time, students should submit a 1-to-2-page description outlining what they want to focus on and a portfolio featuring some images of work they have already created in that realm. Upon careful evaluation, students with the strongest proposals will be selected. This course may be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Spring 2020
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