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41 - 50 of 269 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 144: On Looking: Art, Obscenity, and the Ethics of Spectatorship

This course considers the ethics of looking at art, photography, and other forms of visual representation that have been declared obscene or indecent, whether by religious authorities, government officials, community representatives, or legal opinions. What are the ethical stakes of looking at such materials? And what are the ethical implications of looking away and insisting that others do so as well? nnThe creation of vanguard art since the late 19th-century has often been linked to the concept of transgression. Is it, we will ask, the modern artist's responsibility to challenge accepted standards of representation and the protocols of looking? If so, how are we, as viewers and students of art, to distinguish between legitimate art and unfit obscenity?
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ARTHIST 144B: Modern Design from the Eiffel Tower to Yves Saint Laurent (ARTHIST 344B)

Iconic episodes in the history of modern European and American design, including production, consumption, circulation and display -- from iron architecture of the department store and the universal exhibition to the branding practices of Andy Warhol and Yves Saint Laurent.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 145: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 345, FEMGEN 145)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 147: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 347)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 148: Art and the First Amendment: Testing the Limits of Expression (SIW 148)

This course will take place in Washington D.C.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ARTHIST 151: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 351, ASNAMST 151D, CSRE 151D)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect and help shape cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 152: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARTHIST 153: Warhol's World (AMSTUD 153, ARTHIST 353, FEMGEN 153, TAPS 153W, TAPS 353W)

Andy Warhol's art has never before been more widely exhibited, published, or licensed for commercial use, product design, and publication than it is today. For all Warhol's promiscuous visibility and global cachet at the current moment, there is much we have yet to learn about his work and the conditions of its making. This course considers the wide world of Warhol's art and life, including his commercial work of the 1950s, Pop art and films of the 1960s, and celebrity portraiture of the 1970s and 80s. Of particular interest throughout will be Warhol's photography as it reflects his interest in wealth and celebrity on the one hand and on the everyday life of everyday people on the other. The course will include multiple visits to Contact Warhol: Photography without End, an exhibition co-curated by Prof. Meyer on view throughout the quarter at the Cantor Arts Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 154: The American Civil War: A Visual History (AMSTUD 154X, ARTHIST 354)

A painting of men charging across a field, a photograph of dead bodies in a ditch, a fragment of metal, a sliver of bone, and a brass button: how do we make sense of the visual record of the American Civil War (1861-65)? From the Capitol Dome to a skeleton dug up in a highway project a hundred years after the last battle, the course will consider the strange and scattered remnants of a famous era. Drawing on the poetry of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville, the paintings of Winslow Homer, the photographs of Alexander Gardner, and the oratory of Abraham Lincoln, the course will examine what cannot be portrayed: the trauma of war.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 154B: Who We Be: Art, Images & Race in Post-Civil Rights America (AFRICAAM 188, CSRE 88)

Over the past half-century, the U.S. has seen profound demographic and cultural change. But racial progress still seems distant. After the faith of the civil rights movement, the fervor of multiculturalism, and even the brief euphoria of a post-racial moment, we remain a nation divided. Resegregation is the norm. The culture wars flare as hot as ever.nnThis course takes a close examination of visual culture¿particularly images, works, and ideas in the contemporary arts, justice movements, and popular culture¿to discuss North American demographic and cultural change and cultural politics over the past half-century. From the Watts uprising to the #BlackLivesMatter movement, from multiculturalism through hip-hop to post-identity art, we will deeply explore the questions: How do Americans see race now? Do we see each other any more clearly than before?
Last offered: Spring 2016
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