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191 - 200 of 447 results for: all courses

FILMSTUD 100B: History of World Cinema II: Critics, Curators Communities (FILMSTUD 300B)

The emphasis on studios, producers, directors, and stars in film historiography can blind us to the work of critics, curators, and film societies in developing and influencing film culture. Such work helped make possible various ¿new waves¿ and experimental cinemas. This course engages mid-twentieth-century cinema, in its great variety (short films, educational films, and influential feature-length films) by foregrounding the creativity of critics, curators, and audiences in understanding and shaping the film industries, technologies and aesthetics of their time.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 100C: History of World Cinema III, 1960-Present (FILMSTUD 300C)

This course will provide an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. We will study some key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a historical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Through an exploration of films from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America, we shall examine the industrial histories of non-Hollywood film production and exhibition practices that produce the particular cinematic cultures of each region.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 101: Fundamentals of Cinematic Analysis: Film Sound (FILMSTUD 301)

The close analysis of film. Emphasis is on formal and narrative techniques in structure and style, and detailed readings of brief sequences. Elements such as cinematography, mise-en-scène, composition, sound, and performance. Films from various historical periods, national cinemas, directors, and genres. Prerequisite: FILMSTUD 4 or equivalent. Recommended: ARTHIST 1 or FILMSTUD 102. Course can be repeated twice for a max of 8 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)

FILMSTUD 102: Theories of the Moving Image (FILMSTUD 302)

Major theoretical arguments and debates about cinema: realism,formalism, poststructuralism, feminism, postmodernism, and phenomenology. Prerequisites: FILMSTUD 4.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 114: Reading Comics (AMSTUD 114X, FILMSTUD 314)

The modern medium of comics, a history that spans 150 years. The flexibility of the medium encountered through the genres of humorous and dramatic comic strips, superheroes, undergrounds, independents, journalism, and autobiography. Innovative creators including McCay, Kirby, Barry, Ware, and critical writings including McCloud, Eisner, Groenstee. Topics include text/image relations, panel-to-panel relations, the page, caricature, sequence, seriality, comics in the context of the fine arts, and relations to other media.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMSTUD 116: International Documentary (FILMSTUD 316)

Historical, aesthetic, and formal developments of documentary through nonfiction films in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FILMSTUD 145: Politics and Aesthetics in East European Cinema (FILMSTUD 345)

From 1945 to the mid-80s, emphasizing Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, and Yugoslav contexts. The relationship between art and politics; postwar establishment of film industries; and emergence of national film movements such as the Polish school, Czech new wave, and new Yugoslav film. Thematic and aesthetic preoccupations of filmmakers such as Wajda, Jancso, Forman, and Kusturica.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FRENCH 118: Literature and the Brain (COMPLIT 138, COMPLIT 238, ENGLISH 118, ENGLISH 218, FRENCH 218, PSYC 126, PSYCH 118F)

Recent developments in and neuroscience and experimental psychology have transformed the way we think about the operations of the brain. What can we learn from this about the nature and function of literary texts? Can innovative ways of speaking affect ways of thinking? Do creative metaphors draw on embodied cognition? Can fictions strengthen our "theory of mind" capabilities? What role does mental imagery play in the appreciation of descriptions? Does (weak) modularity help explain the mechanism and purpose of self-reflexivity? Can the distinctions among types of memory shed light on what narrative works have to offer?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

FRENCH 120: Coffee and Cigarettes: The Making of French Intellectual Culture

Examines a quintessential French figure "l'intellectuel" from a long-term historical perspective. We will observe how this figure was shaped over time by such other cultural types as the writer, the artist, the historian, the philosopher, and the moralist. Proceeding in counter-chronological order, from the late 20th to the 16th century, we will read a collection of classic French works. As this course is a gateway for French studies, special emphasis will be placed on oral proficiency. Taught in French; readings in French.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FRENCH 130: Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Literature

In this introductory course, we will read some key texts of literature written in French between 1100 and 1600, paying special attention to how gender, ethnicity and love played a role in the doing and undoing of communities. What does it mean to be a woman writer when most things were written by men? What does it mean to be a man, at court or at war? What did people learn when traveling to Asia or to the New Continent, and how did it impact the way people conceived of ethnicity? How did people think of ethnic difference in their midst? How can love strengthen an empire, and how can one be sincere when copying a love-poem? These cultural questions will be answered with special attention to literary form. Different genres might have yielded different possibilities to not just represent, but also imagine ways of living together; perhaps the very structure of a sentence allows one to construe one¿s own identity. While the course will be taught in French, no knowledge of Old French, Latin, or Occitan is required. All readings will be done in modern French or English translation. Assignments and discussions are all in French. Students are highly encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or to successfully test above this level through the Language Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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