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1 - 10 of 18 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 108H: Housing Affordability Crisis in California: Causes, Impacts, and Solutions (PUBLPOL 108H)

This course will divided into three sections that when combined provide 1) the overall narrative of the precedents and adverse impacts of the worldwide, US west coast and California housing crises and the frameworks for California to create a balanced housing market without causing extreme displacement; 2) an overview of the planning, regulatory and development environments in California along with an opportunities/threats analysis to illuminate current opportunities to achieve a balanced housing market; and 3) an overview of the federal, state, regional and local housing policy environments and areas of policy work addressing and responding to the California housing crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: LeSar, J. (PI)

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-CE
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 127B: Leadership, Organizing and Action: Intensive (CSRE 127B, ETHICSOC 127B)

Two Consecutive Weekend Course: Community Organizing makes a difference in addressing major public challenges that demand full engagement of the citizenry, especially those whose voices are marginalized. In this course you will learn and practice the leadership skills needed to mobilize your communities for positive social change. We identify leadership as accepting responsibility to enable others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty. As organizers you will learn how to develop capacity within your community and analyze power dynamics to develop a strategic plan. By the end of this course, you will create an organizing campaign that builds power rooted in the resources of your community. The class will be an intensive held the first two weekends of winter quarter, Jan 13-15 and Jan 20-22, 2023. Class begins on Friday in the afternoon and runs through early Sunday evening.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

URBANST 127C: Leadership, Organizing and Action: Campaign Coaching (ETHICSOC 127C)

Community Organizing makes a difference in addressing major public challenges that demand full engagement of the citizenry, especially those whose voices are marginalized. In this course you will learn and practice the leadership skills of campaign coaching in order to facilitate others to mobilize their communities for positive social change. Enrollment by consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Engage with founders of leading social enterprises, including the "guru of green business" per the Associated Press, a "Most Innovative AI Innovation" recipient per Fast Company, a "35 Inventors under 35" Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) winner, and a Sustainability Hall of Fame inductee. Guest social entrepreneurs will feature Diego Saez Gil of Pachama, Hannah Sieber of Artyc, and Sami Inkinen of Virta Health. The weekly line-up of accomplished founders also includes Joel Makower of GreenBiz and Troy Carter and Patrick Leung of Earthshot Labs. Students will be exposed to the perspectives and endeavors of global high-impact entrepreneurs who address social and environmental needs in the U.S. and internationally through for-profit, nonprofit and hybrid models. Each week students will have the opportunity to converse with guest social entrepreneurs. This class will expose students to pioneering thought leaders, diverse impact career paths, networking and potential internship and job opportunities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Edwards, M. (PI)

URBANST 132: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (EARTHSYS 137)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. For permission to enroll, please fill out this very brief Google form at https://forms.gle/morY9QsUhNuDds7x8.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

URBANST 133: Social Enterprise Workshop (EARTHSYS 133)

Social Enterprise Workshop: A team based class to design solutions to social issues. In the class students will identify issues they are interested in, such as housing, food, the environment, or college access. They will join teams of like-minded students. Working under the guidance of an experienced social entrepreneur, together they will develop a solution to one part of their issue and write a business plan for that solution. The class will also feature guests who are leaders in the field of social entrepreneurship who will share their stories and help with the business plans. The business plan exercise can be used for both nonprofits and for-profits. Previous students have started successful organizations and raised significant funds based on the business plans developed in this class. There are no prerequisites, and students do not need to have an idea for a social enterprise to join the class. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scher, L. (PI)

URBANST 143: MAXIMUM CITY: Post-Colonial Mumbai at the Crossroads of Global and South Asian Culture (ANTHRO 128B)

There are few cities more emblematic of the rapid urbanization of today's global population than Mumbai, India, formerly known as Bombay. With over 20 million residents, Mumbai today stands as the most populous city in one of the world's most populous countries, an ever-expanding metropolis marked by starkclass disparities and a heterogenous collage of religious, ethnic, and caste communities struggling to find space on a narrow peninsula painstakingly reclaimed from the Arabian Sea. The city's glitz, glamour, and diversity have long made it an object of fascination for both Indians and foreigners alike. Not only is Mumbai a major engine of culture and politics within India, but the city also has a long history of furnishing imagery of South Asian life to the wider world, whether as a site for documentaries and novels or through colorful Bollywood films. In this course, students will have the opportunity to use Mumbai as a jumping-off point to explore South Asian culture and society, a more »
There are few cities more emblematic of the rapid urbanization of today's global population than Mumbai, India, formerly known as Bombay. With over 20 million residents, Mumbai today stands as the most populous city in one of the world's most populous countries, an ever-expanding metropolis marked by starkclass disparities and a heterogenous collage of religious, ethnic, and caste communities struggling to find space on a narrow peninsula painstakingly reclaimed from the Arabian Sea. The city's glitz, glamour, and diversity have long made it an object of fascination for both Indians and foreigners alike. Not only is Mumbai a major engine of culture and politics within India, but the city also has a long history of furnishing imagery of South Asian life to the wider world, whether as a site for documentaries and novels or through colorful Bollywood films. In this course, students will have the opportunity to use Mumbai as a jumping-off point to explore South Asian culture and society, as well as contemporary themes in global urban studies: How do issues such as gentrification, rural-urban migration, segregation, the globalization of capitalism, and decolonialization play out in a city such as Mumbai? What happens to supposedly timeless identities such as religion, caste, and ethnicity when they are subjected to the pressures of intense urbanization? What kinds of data can we use to answer these questions, and what are their respective strengths and limitations?We will address these questions through a wide range of materials, including film, literature, and academic texts. By the end of the quarter, students should not only find themselves with expanded knowledge of South Asia, Mumbai, and global urbanism, but also with increased confidence regarding the types of data, methodology, and analysis they can employ in their own projects. No prior knowledge of South Asia or urban studies is assumed for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gray, B. (PI)

URBANST 144U: Cape to Cairo: Decolonization and African Urban Life 1940s-1960s (AFRICAAM 46, CSRE 46, HISTORY 46S)

Decolonization across Africa was complicated, messy and sometimes violent. It was also an important moment for (re) imagining and (re)structuring society resulting in fascinating historical encounters among different groups. This course explores decolonization through the lens of different African urban spaces. In doing so, we shall focus on the major conflicts, debates and issues that emerged in the moment of decolonization. Additionally, we shall explore the different ways Africans survived, lived and thrived in the cities. Finally, we shall explore the relationships between the colonial and postcolonial eras through African urban spaces.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Tirop, C. (PI)

URBANST 155: Just Transitions Policy Lab (CSRE 155, EARTHSYS 119)

Building off the work of the Stanford Coalition for Planning an Equitable 2035 (SCoPE), the just transitions policy lab will address transportation justice, housing justice, and labor equity concerns that have been identified by neighboring communities to Stanford and our service workers as part of local land use planning and policy processes. Building on the success of earlier housing justice policy lab initiatives, this course will support ongoing policy engagement in local land use planning process, including housing and transportation justice issues. Key concepts addressed will include environmental justice (EJ) and just transitions frameworks, as well as building awareness of the Bay Area housing crisis. The course will culminate in class projects that will involve working with community partners to address information gaps on worker experiences and housing and transportation needs. We will meet for a weekly 3-hour session. Sessions will prioritize 1) foundational concepts in envi more »
Building off the work of the Stanford Coalition for Planning an Equitable 2035 (SCoPE), the just transitions policy lab will address transportation justice, housing justice, and labor equity concerns that have been identified by neighboring communities to Stanford and our service workers as part of local land use planning and policy processes. Building on the success of earlier housing justice policy lab initiatives, this course will support ongoing policy engagement in local land use planning process, including housing and transportation justice issues. Key concepts addressed will include environmental justice (EJ) and just transitions frameworks, as well as building awareness of the Bay Area housing crisis. The course will culminate in class projects that will involve working with community partners to address information gaps on worker experiences and housing and transportation needs. We will meet for a weekly 3-hour session. Sessions will prioritize 1) foundational concepts in environmental justice 2) current issues in our community related to housing, transportation, and labor equity, 2) peer learning through collective engagement in readings and project planning, 4) community connections related to SCoPE initiatives that deepen existing relationships, and 5) policy analysis related to local land use planning processes. The teaching team will be accepting brief student applications for course participation prior to Winter quarter. To apply for this course, please fill out this google form: https://forms.gle/D3BPeiSEDK9kviJW8 Due December 2 at 11:59pm.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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