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1 - 10 of 13 results for: SUSTAIN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SUSTAIN 1B: Know Your Planet: Earth in the Laboratory

Explore how Earth¿s big questions are answered inside the laboratory. The challenges that face our planet today are large and wide ranging. In this course, you will discover how these questions are studied and tackled inside some of Stanford¿s cutting edge laboratories. You will meet faculty working on a diverse array of environmental problems and take tours of their laboratories to understand how observations in the lab are at the heart of scientific discovery. Open to all students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Vanorio, T. (PI)

SUSTAIN 2: Climate and Society

How and why is the climate changing? How might a changing climate affect human society? And what can we do to alter the course of climate change and adapt to any climatic changes that do occur? This course provides an introduction to the natural science and social science of climate change. The focus is on what science tells us about the causes, consequences, and solutions to climate change, as well as on how scientific progress is made on these issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

SUSTAIN 51N: Ecologies of Communication (DLCL 21N, ENGLISH 21N)

What remnants of our culture will future generations discover and decipher and how will they interpret these? How will they access the technologies we have created? How will they understand the environmental changes that current humans have caused? And how will their encounters with the past inform their own future? This IntroSem explores a humanistic perspective on sustainability, viewing the human record itself as a resource and exploring how it might be sustained in an ethical and meaningful way. Broadly, we ask what is the science behind sustaining the ecology of historic heritage?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

SUSTAIN 101A: Decision Making for Sustainable Energy

All people and societies face challenges and opportunities for living sustainably in our world. We must make many difficult and complex decisions in our lives as individuals, citizens, and leaders. Through participation in this course, students will develop the tools and knowledge to make wiser decisions. Students will work through realistic cases involving energy systems at personal, local, and national scales. For each case, students will work separately and together to identify possible options; evaluate the range of costs and benefits of each; identify economic, social, environmental, and technological barriers and opportunities. They will learn what information is relevant, how to get and use it, how to make and justify good decisions in the context of sustainability. Grading for this initial offering of this course will be satisfactory/NC, based on completing multiple individual and group assignments in a way that meets course standards. The course is accessible to all undergraduate students, including frosh and sophomores.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SUSTAIN 131: Imagining Adaptive Societies (CSRE 161, CSRE 261, ENGLISH 131D, SUSTAIN 231)

The ecological, social, and economic crises of the Anthropocene suggest it is time for us to re-imagine how best to organize our communities, our institutions, and our societies. Despite the clear shortcomings, our society remains stuck in a rut of inaction. During periods of rapid social and economic change, segments of society become gripped by a nostalgia for idealized pasts that never really existed; such nostalgia acts as a powerful force that holds back innovation and contributes to a failure of imagination. How, then, might we imagine alternative social arrangements that could allow us to thrive sustainably in an environment of greater equity? Moshin Hamid reminds us that literature allows us to break from violent nostalgia while imagining better worlds, while Ursula K. Le Guin notes that "imaginative fiction trains people to be aware that there are other ways to do things, other ways to be; that there is not just one civilization, and it is good, and it is the way we have to be more »
The ecological, social, and economic crises of the Anthropocene suggest it is time for us to re-imagine how best to organize our communities, our institutions, and our societies. Despite the clear shortcomings, our society remains stuck in a rut of inaction. During periods of rapid social and economic change, segments of society become gripped by a nostalgia for idealized pasts that never really existed; such nostalgia acts as a powerful force that holds back innovation and contributes to a failure of imagination. How, then, might we imagine alternative social arrangements that could allow us to thrive sustainably in an environment of greater equity? Moshin Hamid reminds us that literature allows us to break from violent nostalgia while imagining better worlds, while Ursula K. Le Guin notes that "imaginative fiction trains people to be aware that there are other ways to do things, other ways to be; that there is not just one civilization, and it is good, and it is the way we have to be." There are - there has to be - other and better ways to be. In this multi-disciplinary class, we turn to speculative fiction as a way of imagining future societies that are adaptable, sustainable, and just and can respond to the major challenges of our age. In addition to reading and discussing a range of novels and short stories, we bring to bear perspectives from climate science, social science, and literary criticism. We will also be hosting several of the authors to talk about their work and ideas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SUSTAIN 223: Confronting Emotions in the Climate Sciences (MED 246)

Traditional climate change courses introduce students to a wide array of scientifically and emotionally challenging subjects without acknowledging the significant distress that climate learners often experience from studiously bearing witness to ecological degradation, and the social injustices this deepens. Students enrolled in the proposed course will study a rapidly growing body of scholarship and activism related to emotive and existential responses to climate change. They will explore the psychosocial complexities that the Anthropocene proposes through key texts, films, and guest lectures that draw on climate psychology, philosophy, art, literature and history. A key outcome of this course is identifying pedagogical tools that can be implemented to foster wellbeing within the climate science community and its adjacent fields. Through self reflection, journaling, and group work, students will develop new self-care skills and collective mental health `protection and promotion' strat more »
Traditional climate change courses introduce students to a wide array of scientifically and emotionally challenging subjects without acknowledging the significant distress that climate learners often experience from studiously bearing witness to ecological degradation, and the social injustices this deepens. Students enrolled in the proposed course will study a rapidly growing body of scholarship and activism related to emotive and existential responses to climate change. They will explore the psychosocial complexities that the Anthropocene proposes through key texts, films, and guest lectures that draw on climate psychology, philosophy, art, literature and history. A key outcome of this course is identifying pedagogical tools that can be implemented to foster wellbeing within the climate science community and its adjacent fields. Through self reflection, journaling, and group work, students will develop new self-care skills and collective mental health `protection and promotion' strategies. A primary goal of the course is to understand how trauma-informed learning modules can support the scientific objectives of graduate students. Final projects will include the development of evidence-based instructional and mentoring recommendations for students studying any aspect of climate science. The course is designed to engage students in participatory scholarship; assessment of the effectiveness of various learning modules on student wellbeing and motivation towards their research will be conducted using pre-post style surveys and qualitative interview methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SUSTAIN 226: Global Social Change, Sustainable Development, and Education (EDUC 136, EDUC 306D, SOC 231)

Focuses on the relations between education and sustainable development from a comparative cross-national perspective. The course covers questions and debates around education for sustainable development and the nature of "the global"; global influences on national institutions of sustainable development; and key themes in the cross-national study of education for sustainable development such as stratification and achievement, gender, human rights, and the global authority of science and experts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

SUSTAIN 324: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 7071), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

SUSTAIN 329: Policy Practicum: Smoke

Clients: Various California legislative and executive branch decision makers. Wildfire smoke has emerged as one of the most pressing air pollution and public health threats in the Western United States. Last year, despite decades of progress in reducing air pollution from transport, industry, and electric power, wildfires caused the highest number of "spare the air" declarations ever called by local Air Quality Management Districts in California. Oregon, Washington and Colorado all suffered similar "airpocalypse" fire seasons. Recent model-based estimates of mortality from wildfire smoke-derived particulate matter suggest that between 1200 and 3000 seniors likely died from the fires this summer. Current law and regulation not only doesn't consider particulate matter derived from wildfire smoke to be a target for regulation, it also imposes burdensome permitting requirements on one of the most effective risk-mitigation strategies: prescribed fire. This course will build on student work more »
Clients: Various California legislative and executive branch decision makers. Wildfire smoke has emerged as one of the most pressing air pollution and public health threats in the Western United States. Last year, despite decades of progress in reducing air pollution from transport, industry, and electric power, wildfires caused the highest number of "spare the air" declarations ever called by local Air Quality Management Districts in California. Oregon, Washington and Colorado all suffered similar "airpocalypse" fire seasons. Recent model-based estimates of mortality from wildfire smoke-derived particulate matter suggest that between 1200 and 3000 seniors likely died from the fires this summer. Current law and regulation not only doesn't consider particulate matter derived from wildfire smoke to be a target for regulation, it also imposes burdensome permitting requirements on one of the most effective risk-mitigation strategies: prescribed fire. This course will build on student work from last spring, where students explored regulatory obstacles to an expansion of prescribed burning in California and began developing a simplified air quality health benefits model to estimate the potential public health and economic benefits of better fuels management. This fall, we will continue refining the air quality model and, on the regulatory side, we will investigate potential new policy approaches to streamlining the approval process for prescribed burning projects while protecting environmental values with a particular focus on new approaches to NEPA and CEQA compliance for prescribed fire and cultural burning. The course is intended for students interested in multi-disciplinary approaches to public policy problems. No background in either the Clean Air Act or wildfire policy is required. Students will engage in weekly lecture and discussion of wildfire smoke science and policy, including student presentations. Students will also meet additionally once per week with Professors Sivas and Wara in working sessions to discuss progress on team projects. Students will present the results of their research to California legislative and executive branch staff engaged in developing new approaches to wildfire policy. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.Same as LAW 808D
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 1 times (up to 3 units total)

SUSTAIN 332: Climate Tech for Rapid Decarbonization

This course examines alternative pathways for economies around the world to achieve deep decarbonization within a couple of decades. The overall perspective is to analyze the global decarbonization process at the intersection of technological improvements, financial fundamentals and the parameters set by public policies.The first part of the course will be concerned with the science and the political economy of climate change, greenhouse gas emissions and the proliferation of net-zero pledges by governments and corporations. Included in this part is a closer look at countries for which the production and export of fossil fuels is a key economic activity. We then turn to the competitiveness of carbon-free or low-carbon technologies in different segments of the economy, including i) power generation, ii) energy storage, iii) transportation, iv) industrial production and v) food and Ag Tech. The final part of the course turns to the emergence of energy technologies with future commercial potential, including hydrogen, fission/fusion, carbon capture and utilization and synthetic hydrocarbons.The course will rely on lectures from each of the three instructors, guest presentations and select case studies. ( SUSTAIN 332 is the same course as GSBGEN 332)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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