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1 - 10 of 35 results for: SURG ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SURG 52Q: Becoming whatever you want to be: lessons learned from a stem cell

Stem cells are extreme: they are the most powerful cells in our body and yet they are unimaginably scarce; they exist in nearly every tissue but actually locating them is enormously challenging. We believe that stem cells have the potential to transform the way we practice medicine, while at the same time their potential application to human disease continues to spark political debates around the world. My laboratory at Stanford works on this remarkable cell, and we believe that they hold answers to some of the pressing questions about the potential for tissue healing and regeneration in our bodies. Come join us in this conversation about stem cells, and both the hype and hope that surrounds their application to medical practice.While we will be focusing on the human body, we encourage participation from those students whose fields of interest fall well outside HumBio. Engineers, artists, historians, writers, economists--all will find intersections between the course subject matter, an more »
Stem cells are extreme: they are the most powerful cells in our body and yet they are unimaginably scarce; they exist in nearly every tissue but actually locating them is enormously challenging. We believe that stem cells have the potential to transform the way we practice medicine, while at the same time their potential application to human disease continues to spark political debates around the world. My laboratory at Stanford works on this remarkable cell, and we believe that they hold answers to some of the pressing questions about the potential for tissue healing and regeneration in our bodies. Come join us in this conversation about stem cells, and both the hype and hope that surrounds their application to medical practice.While we will be focusing on the human body, we encourage participation from those students whose fields of interest fall well outside HumBio. Engineers, artists, historians, writers, economists--all will find intersections between the course subject matter, and their own interests. In this virtual class, we¿ll be taking advantage of a number of online tools including Zoom, Canvas, and Slack. Group work will figure prominently into this course, and we¿ll discuss and agree upon team charters to facilitate those collaborations. Finally, I recognize the challenge of bringing this class into a virtual world. There are plenty of obstacles to ¿distance learning¿: You might struggle to understand an assignment. You might find it is easy to be distracted. You might have an unreliable internet. I¿m here to tell you: we¿re in this together. We¿re navigating uncharted territory here! That means we¿re going to think creatively, we¿re going to speak up when we have questions or ideas or complaints or objections. We¿re going to learn and problem-solve and create like we¿ve never learned or problem-solved or created before. And when we fail, we¿ll try again. Come join us!
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Helms, J. (PI)

SURG 70Q: Surgical Anatomy of the Hand: From Rodin to Reconstruction

The surgical anatomy of the hand is extremely complex in terms of structure and function. Exploration of the anatomy of the hand in different contexts: its representation in art forms, the historical development of the study of hand anatomy, current operative techniques for reconstruction, advances in tissue engineering, and the future of hand transplantation.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Chang, J. (PI)

SURG 100B: Virtual And Real: Human Anatomy And Sports Injuries Of The Head And Neck

This undergraduate course is designed to teach human anatomy through cadaver specimens, radiographs, CT scans and MRIs with the emphasis on the understanding of common sports injuries of the head and neck. To aid students in developing their image interpretive skills, additional resources such as the 3D anatomy table and interactive digital applications will be utilized. This course divides the anatomy of the head and neck into five areas; each area will be presented in a two-week block. Students will develop an understanding of human anatomy through the identification of relevant structures on prosecutions (cadaver material) and apps, and utilizing this knowledge, in the interpretation of radiographs, CT scans and MRIs. The anatomy will be taught in relation to common sports injuries with group projects and presentations focusing on the understanding of the anatomy and treatment of these conditions and injuries. The class is limited to 20 students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SURG 101: Regional Study of Human Structure

Enrollment limited to seniors and graduate students. Comprises two parts, lecture and lab, both of which are required and both of which are taught in-person this year. Lectures and labs will include a regional approach to the study of human anatomy of the trunk and limbs. Lab sessions will include working in teams to complete dissection of an embalmed cadaver. Excludes the head & neck.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

SURG 144: Athletes in Medicine at Stanford (AIMS)

AIMS has been created as a supplemental resource for student-athletes who have an interest in pursuing a career in medicine. The goal of the class is to foster an intimate community of current and former Stanford student-athletes in nmedicine providing resources and guidance to allow individuals a chance to thrive in this challenging and rewarding field. This will be a credit/no credit seminar with a focus on exploring topics such as medical school applications, nplacement tests, research, and careers in medicine.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Sgroi, M. (PI)

SURG 199: Undergraduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Adams, G. (PI) ; Auerbach, P. (PI) ; Azagury, D. (PI) ; Barrett, B. (PI) ; Bertelsen, C. (PI) ; Bonham, C. (PI) ; Bresler, M. (PI) ; Browder, T. (PI) ; Bruzoni, M. (PI) ; Buncke, G. (PI) ; Buntic, R. (PI) ; Busque, S. (PI) ; Chang, J. (PI) ; Chao, S. (PI) ; Chase, R. (PI) ; Concepcion, W. (PI) ; Curtin, C. (PI) ; D'Souza, P. (PI) ; Dalman, R. (PI) ; Dannenberg, B. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dirbas, F. (PI) ; Dulong, M. (PI) ; Duriseti, R. (PI) ; Dutta, S. (PI) ; Eisenberg, D. (PI) ; Esquivel, C. (PI) ; Fox, P. (PI) ; Fuchs, J. (PI) ; Fukaya, E. (PI) ; Gallo, A. (PI) ; Garcia Toca, M. (PI) ; Gilbert, G. (PI) ; Girod, S. (PI) ; Gosling, J. (PI) ; Greco, R. (PI) ; Gregg, D. (PI) ; Gurtner, G. (PI) ; Harris, E. (PI) ; Harter, P. (PI) ; Hartman, G. (PI) ; Hawn, M. (PI) ; Helms, J. (PI) ; Hentz, R. (PI) ; Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI) ; Hill, B. (PI) ; Jeffrey, S. (PI) ; Johannet, P. (PI) ; Kahn, D. (PI) ; Karanas, Y. (PI) ; Khosla, R. (PI) ; Kin, C. (PI) ; Klein, M. (PI) ; Klofas, E. (PI) ; Krams, S. (PI) ; Krummel, T. (PI) ; Lau, J. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Leeper, N. (PI) ; Longaker, M. (PI) ; Lorenz, H. (PI) ; Lund, D. (PI) ; Maggio, P. (PI) ; Mahadevan, S. (PI) ; Martinez, O. (PI) ; Melcher, M. (PI) ; Mell, M. (PI) ; Menard, R. (PI) ; Milliken, R. (PI) ; Morton, J. (PI) ; Mueller, C. (PI) ; Muguti, G. (PI) ; Murphy, K. (PI) ; Nazerali, R. (PI) ; Newberry, J. (PI) ; Norris, R. (PI) ; Norton, J. (PI) ; Oberhelman, H. (PI) ; Pearl, R. (PI) ; Poultsides, G. (PI) ; Powell, D. (PI) ; Quinn, J. (PI) ; Raphael, E. (PI) ; Rhoads, K. (PI) ; Rivas, H. (PI) ; Ross, E. (PI) ; Ryan, J. (PI) ; Salvatierra, O. (PI) ; Schendel, S. (PI) ; Schreiber, D. (PI) ; Shelton, A. (PI) ; Sherck, J. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; So, S. (PI) ; Sorial, E. (PI) ; Spain, D. (PI) ; Srivastava, S. (PI) ; Staudenmayer, K. (PI) ; Sternbach, G. (PI) ; Sylvester, K. (PI) ; Taleghani, N. (PI) ; Trounce, M. (PI) ; Visser, B. (PI) ; Wall, J. (PI) ; Wan, D. (PI) ; Wang, N. (PI) ; Wapnir, I. (PI) ; Weiser, T. (PI) ; Weiss, E. (PI) ; Welton, M. (PI) ; Whitmore, I. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Wren, S. (PI) ; Yang, G. (PI) ; Yang, S. (PI) ; Zanchi, M. (PI) ; Zarins, C. (PI) ; Zhou, W. (PI)

SURG 205: Technical Training and Preparation for the Surgical Environment

This course is designed for preclinical students in the School of Medicine interested in acquiring the technical skills and clinical orientation necessary to learn and participate in the surgical environment. Students will begin with scrub training to learn sterile technique prior to participation in the operating room followed by basic surgical techniques (including knot tying, suturing, hand-sewn bowel anastomoses, and laparoscopic skills) to enhance their operating room experiences. In addition, the course will expose students to life as a surgeon. The class requires one to two mandatory operative shadowing experiences with an attending surgeon outside of normal class hours. Opportunities for one-on-one surgical faculty membership will be provided. This course will be held in person. Entry into the course: Second year students (MD, MS2) will get priority, especially those who could not enroll in the course last year and those that plan on declaring a Surgery Scholarly Concentration. 14 students can be accommodated each quarter. Indicate your interest in the course here: https://forms.gle/2CAz4YyC6hwmdUgY9. If selected for the course, you will be emailed a code that will allow you to register for the course on https://explorecourses.stanford.edu. All questions may be directed to Dr. Rachel Jensen r2jensen@stanford.edu. Confirmation of enrollment: If selected, students will be sent an enrollment code a week before classes start. Input the enrollment code when prompted on AXESS.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

SURG 208: Plastic Surgery Tutorial

Diagnosis, theory, and practice of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Limited to two students per faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2

SURG 236: Seminar in Global Surgery and Anesthesia

Providing safe, mutually beneficial, and sustainable surgical services in low-resource settings presents a unique set of considerations. This seminar, formatted as five two-hour sessions, will explore the background rationale for the evolving field of Global Surgery and discuss the unique implications surrounding implementation of global surgical programs. Course format will blend didactic presentation, discussion-based journal clubs, and case-based study. Topics covered will include the burden of surgical disease, human and infrastructure capacity building, outcomes, ethics/equity, economics, innovation/technology, volunteerism, training, safety, and research agenda. Instructors will provide mentorship to participants, helping them to formulate feasible research or potential MedScholar project.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
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