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1 - 10 of 12 results for: STS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

STS 1: Introduction to Science, Technology & Society

The course introduces students to critical perspectives on the history, social context, epistemology, and ethics of science, technology, and medicine. The goal of the course is to learn about major concepts and methods from science & technology studies, introduced in the context of real-world issues. STS 1 is the required gateway course for the major in Science, Technology & Society, but is open to students from all departments and disciplines. A final paper will be required. There will be no final exam.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

STS 10SI: Introduction to AI Alignment

As we delegate more and more societal responsibilities to Artificial Intelligence, we raise pressing ethical questions about what will happen if these systems are not aligned with our values. Many people, including AI experts like Stuart Russell, believe that there is an urgent need to mitigate the risks associated with future advanced AI systems and to ensure that their contributions are beneficial to humanity and the world. This 8-week course explores these questions in small discussion-based environments led by student facilitators with targeted readings, weekly group discussions, and an optional project. We will start by exploring arguments for and against the importance of AI alignment work, especially in relation to reducing existential risk. Then, we will learn about existing AI safety technical research, efforts to implement policy measures that reduce AI risk, and how you can personally contribute to AI safety. Enrollment is by application only. Application deadlines are: Autumn: Sunday, October 9, 2022, Winter: Saturday, January 14, 2023, Spring: Saturday, April 8, 2023. Apply online at https://linktr.ee/stanfordaialignment
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

STS 51D: Ethical STEM: Race, Justice, and Embodied Practice (AFRICAAM 151, ARTSINST 151C, CSRE 151C, SYMSYS 151D, TAPS 151D)

What role do science and technology play in the creation of a just society? How do we confront and redress the impact of racism and bias within the history, theory, and practice of these disciplines? This course invites students to grapple with the complex intersections between race, inequality, justice, and the STEM fields. We orient to these questions from an artistically-informed position, asking how we can rally the embodied practices of artists to address how we think, make, and respond to each other. Combining readings from the history of science, technology, and medicine, ethics and pedagogy, as well as the fine and performing arts, we will embark together on understanding how our STEM practices have emerged, how we participate today, and what we can imagine for them in the future. The course will involve workshops, field trips (as possible), and invited guests. All students, from any discipline, field, interest, and background, are welcome! This course does build upon the STS 51 series from 2020-21, though it is not a prerequisite for this course. Please contact the professor if you have any questions!
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Robinson, A. (PI)

STS 156: The Future of Global Systemic Risk (EARTHSYS 156, SOC 128)

The global risk environment is changing. Seemingly distinct large-scale risks affect what we now realize are mutually interdependent human, socio-technical, and ecological systems. As a result, consequences are more catastrophic, and costs are set to accelerate. How do we determine the top risks of this decade to prioritize actions, and how are both risks and actions likely to evolve and interact? This course investigates the data, methods, and insights mobilized by key actors such as corporations, governments, and academics to assess systemic risk, create future scenarios, and generate predictions. What are the track records of recognized systemic risk assessment and modeling toolkits? Going forward, how can we get better at risk prevention and mitigation? This year, the course will focus on combined risks from the environmental, health, and emerging tech domains. The key objective is to quickly learn relevant vocabularies (risk, tech, and futurist) by engaging with both traditional a more »
The global risk environment is changing. Seemingly distinct large-scale risks affect what we now realize are mutually interdependent human, socio-technical, and ecological systems. As a result, consequences are more catastrophic, and costs are set to accelerate. How do we determine the top risks of this decade to prioritize actions, and how are both risks and actions likely to evolve and interact? This course investigates the data, methods, and insights mobilized by key actors such as corporations, governments, and academics to assess systemic risk, create future scenarios, and generate predictions. What are the track records of recognized systemic risk assessment and modeling toolkits? Going forward, how can we get better at risk prevention and mitigation? This year, the course will focus on combined risks from the environmental, health, and emerging tech domains. The key objective is to quickly learn relevant vocabularies (risk, tech, and futurist) by engaging with both traditional and emerging assessment methods, in order to discover how to shape positive societal outcomes in the next decade and beyond. The course prepares students for key roles in the assessment, management, and prediction of risks, technologies, markets, industries, infrastructures, and futures. People with these skills can affect the governance principles, strategies, and leadership of corporations, philanthropies, states, economies, and entire societies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Undheim, T. (PI)

STS 191W: Doing STS: Introduction to Research

This seminar introduces key analytical approaches and methodologies in the interdisciplinary field of STS, as well as basic tools for designing and conducting original research in STS and related social sciences. Students survey a series of influential studies that examined the intersection of science, technology and society; identify productive questions of their own interest; and explore how to pursue them through strong research design. By completing smaller writing assignments throughout the quarter, you will produce a fully developed research proposal as final assignment. This final proposal can serve as an honors prospectus for students who seek to participate in the STS honors program. First week attendance is mandatory.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Sato, K. (PI)

STS 198: Independent Research

Independent research. Student develops own project with supervision by an STS faculty affiliate. Students must email Prof. Edwards with brief project description and name of faculty supervisor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

STS 199: Independent Study

Every unit of credit is understood to represent three hours of work per week per term and is to be agreed upon between the student and the faculty member. Instructor consent required. Please contact the department for a permission number.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

STS 199A: Curricular Practical Training

Students obtain internship in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree program and area of concentration. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the STS Program Director. At the end of the quarter, a one-page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship. Limited to declared STS majors only. Course may be repeated twice. Instructor consent required. Please contact the department for a permission number.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

STS 199J: Editing a Science Technology and Society Journal

The Science Technology and Society (STS) Program has a student journal, Intersect, that has been publishing STS student papers for a number of years. This course involves learning about how to serve as an editor of a peer-reviewed journal, while serving as one of the listed editors of Intersect. Entirely operated online, the journal uses a work-flow management to help with the submission process, peer-review, editing, and publication. Student editors learn by being involved in the publishing process, from soliciting manuscripts to publishing the journal's annual issue, while working in consultation with the instructor. Students will also learn about current practices and institutional frameworks around open access and digital publishing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

STS 200J: Technometabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene

The technosphere - the global sum of all infrastructure - metabolizes energy, materials, and information to feed human consumption. It runs on fossil fuels and solar energy, metabolized through such processes as photosynthesis (agriculture), photovoltaics, wind, and hydroelectric power. The technosphere also metabolizes information, ingesting some kinds of data as inputs and producing other data as outputs. Techno-metabolism's waste products, such as greenhouse gases, microplastics, and nuclear waste, are currently transforming the atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere, with radically different effects on disparate peoples and places. Scientists, historians, engineers, and others have proposed new ways to conceptualize techno-metabolism, seeking to reduce its energy requirements and material waste. In this group-project-centered course, students will develop creative ways to visualize, understand, and change the interplay of energy, materials, and information to respond to environmental crises in the Anthropocene era.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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