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1 - 10 of 35 results for: PSYC ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYC 21N: How we think as how we feel: Cognitive and emotional influences on mental health

Plato described Reason and Emotion as two horses pulling a chariot in different directions. Was he right? By the end of this course, you will be able to decide for yourself, based on the latest scientific evidence. You will also be able to explain how your answer reflects, and informs, current research on mental health. In this course, we will start by reading philosophical texts that establish the classical Western view of emotion and cognition as opposing forces. We will then put these views to the test by examining evidence from the fields of neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry. When thoughts and feelings compete, which one wins? Is it ever rational to follow your emotions? How do thoughts and feelings affect perception, memory, and decision-making? We will then turn to practical applications of cognitive-emotional interactions in the field of psychiatry. First, we will examine the implications of biases in perception, memory, and decision-making for mental health. Next, we wil more »
Plato described Reason and Emotion as two horses pulling a chariot in different directions. Was he right? By the end of this course, you will be able to decide for yourself, based on the latest scientific evidence. You will also be able to explain how your answer reflects, and informs, current research on mental health. In this course, we will start by reading philosophical texts that establish the classical Western view of emotion and cognition as opposing forces. We will then put these views to the test by examining evidence from the fields of neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry. When thoughts and feelings compete, which one wins? Is it ever rational to follow your emotions? How do thoughts and feelings affect perception, memory, and decision-making? We will then turn to practical applications of cognitive-emotional interactions in the field of psychiatry. First, we will examine the implications of biases in perception, memory, and decision-making for mental health. Next, we will introduce cognitive profiles of specific psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, depression, and autism. We will also discuss clinical interventions that are informed by cognitive theories of psychiatric disorders, for example, cognitive behavioral therapy, which helps people change how they feel by changing how they think. Finally, we will examine how the physical body influences thoughts and feelings, with implications for psychiatric disorders. What is the relationship of physical illness to psychiatric illness? Is sleep as good as overnight therapy? Is there a scientific basis for the notion that emotions originate from the heart? By the end of this course, you will be able to describe whether mental well-being arise from the head, the heart, or their interaction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PSYC 30N: The Terrible Toll of Close Combat: Fact and Myth from Xenophon to Fallujah to the X-Box

"Close Combat" is the direct, violent encounter of troops at short range. Commanders, historians, and politicians may view grand elements of strategy, logistics or tactical maneuver to assess armed conflict. But in close combat, soldiers on that "thin red line" face a rapidly narrowing set of possibilities as terrain, time and distance are focused to a point of brutal action. Psychologically this is the vanishing point of legal, moral, and religious proscriptions that have guided life to that point where, it is said, the soldiers becomes "transparent": all that one is or hoped or dreamt can be abruptly extinguished en toto. In this course we will examine the sociobiological, medical, psychological, and legal aspects of close combat: including the systematic preconditioning of soldiers for killing, the fraternal social milieu of the small combat unit and the impact on survivors who need to deconstruct that conditioning and social bond. We will examine first-hand descriptions of close co more »
"Close Combat" is the direct, violent encounter of troops at short range. Commanders, historians, and politicians may view grand elements of strategy, logistics or tactical maneuver to assess armed conflict. But in close combat, soldiers on that "thin red line" face a rapidly narrowing set of possibilities as terrain, time and distance are focused to a point of brutal action. Psychologically this is the vanishing point of legal, moral, and religious proscriptions that have guided life to that point where, it is said, the soldiers becomes "transparent": all that one is or hoped or dreamt can be abruptly extinguished en toto. In this course we will examine the sociobiological, medical, psychological, and legal aspects of close combat: including the systematic preconditioning of soldiers for killing, the fraternal social milieu of the small combat unit and the impact on survivors who need to deconstruct that conditioning and social bond. We will examine first-hand descriptions of close combat, through memoir, literature, congressional testimony, and guest speakers. The perspective will be that of the long history of youth facing the bleeding edge of battle and the recent ambiguous implications of "remote" and "virtual" combat. Course will include preparatory excerpted reading, short didactics, occasional guest speakers for half the sessions and group discussion of session topics / student presentations for the latter half. The student will be expected to write a short paper on each of two topics from a list of prompts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Carragee, E. (PI)

PSYC 55N: Secrecy

What is a secret and why do we keep them? What is the cost - and the burden - of secret-keeping? The focus of this seminar will be professional secrecy, as we explore corporate confidentiality and the secret-keeping expected of all of us as professionals, and those who are engaged in issues of national security. Secrecy will be discussed in both ethical and practical frameworks. We will also explore psychology of secrecy, and secret-keeping in relationships. Students will begin to develop a personal ethic related to secrecy and will grapple with the intersection of secrets, lies and obfuscation.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Jacobs, J. (PI)

PSYC 56N: The Personal Genomics Revolution: Focus on Mental Health

The Human Genome Project transformed the field of medicine and launched the "Personal Genomics Revolution". It is now possible to view your DNA in minute detail for only $99. Height, weight, educational attainment, depression risk, and much more, can be predicted using genetic information. Ethical questions abound regarding the use of genetic information in medicine, the legal system, government, and private companies. On the other hand, genetic findings may dramatically improve mental health treatment by guiding the development of new medications, matching patients to the right treatments, and identifying people for whom early mental health services might make all the difference. How much can you learn about risk for mental health problems from your DNA? This course will provide the foundational genetic and statistical information necessary for understanding the current and future capabilities of personal genomic predictions for mental health outcomes including depression, anxiety, bi more »
The Human Genome Project transformed the field of medicine and launched the "Personal Genomics Revolution". It is now possible to view your DNA in minute detail for only $99. Height, weight, educational attainment, depression risk, and much more, can be predicted using genetic information. Ethical questions abound regarding the use of genetic information in medicine, the legal system, government, and private companies. On the other hand, genetic findings may dramatically improve mental health treatment by guiding the development of new medications, matching patients to the right treatments, and identifying people for whom early mental health services might make all the difference. How much can you learn about risk for mental health problems from your DNA? This course will provide the foundational genetic and statistical information necessary for understanding the current and future capabilities of personal genomic predictions for mental health outcomes including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. We will also explore the ways in which genetic data can reveal where our ancestors lived as well as the consequences of a lack of diversity in genetic databases. This course also focuses on the practice of science, how it works well and how it can go terribly wrong. Learning from past examples of the misuse of genetic information, students will propose and debate strategies for maximizing the utility of genetic research to improve mental health while simultaneously limiting potential harms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Duncan, L. (PI)

PSYC 60N: The Psychology of Stoked (LIFE 60N)

Examines the biological, psychological and social aspects of what it means to live a positive, life-affirming existence. Drawing from a wide range of sources, from psychiatry and psychology, to spirituality and philosophy, seminar informs on the latest thinking about the psychology of happiness, and questions assumptions about personal happiness. Explores the new field of positive psychology and pulls from a multidisciplinary literature, examining life satisfaction and happiness from many perspectives, and the psychiatry of stimulation including substance, human sexuality, and healthy methods of attaining happiness. Includes guest speakers from many different backgrounds and perspectives. Examines what it means to be truly mindful.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PSYC 86Q: Psychology of Xenophobia

What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrati more »
What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrating Islamic spirituality into therapy as a means of addressing the under utilization of mental health services in Muslim populations. A combination of stimulating group discussions, talks by guest speakers, and field trips to community partners will provide students with different perspectives and a deeper understanding of these topics. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 111Q: The Changing Face of "Mental Illness" in Women: Historical, Medical and Artistic Approaches

In this seminar we want to take a look at women's lives beginning in the past century to the present and the many changes which occurred in conceptualizing and understanding mental illness. The female reproductive system has been linked to mental illness in women for centuries. The womb was believed to be the source of anxiety and depression, leading women to become 'hysterical'. But what does 'hysteria' really mean, and how have historical and cultural attitudes towards women framed the study of women's mental health? How have the expectations of and demands on women and their role in society changed from the 19th to the 20th century? How have advances in health care and changing economic conditions influenced women's health? The course will introduce students to historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), eating disorders, the hysterias and functional neurologic disorders and infertility and postpartum depression will be analyzed more »
In this seminar we want to take a look at women's lives beginning in the past century to the present and the many changes which occurred in conceptualizing and understanding mental illness. The female reproductive system has been linked to mental illness in women for centuries. The womb was believed to be the source of anxiety and depression, leading women to become 'hysterical'. But what does 'hysteria' really mean, and how have historical and cultural attitudes towards women framed the study of women's mental health? How have the expectations of and demands on women and their role in society changed from the 19th to the 20th century? How have advances in health care and changing economic conditions influenced women's health? The course will introduce students to historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), eating disorders, the hysterias and functional neurologic disorders and infertility and postpartum depression will be analyzed through a historical bio-psycho-social lens. Historical reading will include primary sources, such as women's diaries and physicians' casebooks and medical case records, as well as secondary sources such as advice books, and 19th- and 20th-century medical texts. Guest speakers from the art history and literature departments will stimulate dialogue regarding literary and artistic images and the social and cultural contexts of these disorders. Importantly, we will examine the changing face of "mental illness in women" in art, literature and medicine--the evolution of diversity in represented voices and the current methods of researching and treating the interface between the female reproductive cycle and psychiatric illness in diverse populations of women. Embedded within each lecture will be break-out sessions with opportunities for students to ask questions and to discuss a topic in greater depth. Students will have the opportunity to complete their own interdisciplinary projects for the course. Prior projects have included not only power point presentations of diverse topics, but also short films and stories, and future women's mental health research project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Casper, R. (PI)

PSYC 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 114, CEE 214, MED 114, MED 214)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to frontier technology, the intersection where radical forward thinking and real-world implementation meet. Topics covered include artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and advanced robotics, smart cities and urban mobility, telecommunications with 5G, and other key emerging technologies in society. These technologies have vast potential to address the largest global challenges of the 21st century, ushering in a new era of progress and change. Limited enrollment, contact instructors for application.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

PSYC 126: Literature and the Brain (COMPLIT 138, COMPLIT 238, ENGLISH 118, ENGLISH 218, FRENCH 118, FRENCH 218, PSYCH 118F)

How does fiction make us better at reading minds? Why do some TV shows get us to believe two contradictory things at once? And can cognitive biases be a writer's best friend? We'll think about these and other questions in the light of contemporary neuroscience and experimental psychology, with the help of Song of Solomon (Toni Morrison), Madame Bovary (Gustave Flaubert), season 1 of Westworld (Lisa Joy / Jonathan Nolan), and short readings from writers like Louise Glück, Jorge Luis Borges, Virginia Woolf, and Marcel Proust. We'll also ask what we see when we read; whether the language we speak affects the way we think; and why different people react differently to the same book. Plus: is free will a fiction, or were you just forced to say that?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PSYC 135: Dement's Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the world's first university course devoted to the science of sleep. Upon his retirement he selected Dr. Rafael Pelayo to be his successor, but he continued to participate in class until his passing in the summer of 2020. To honor his legacy in perpetuity, Dr.Pelayo renamed the course 'Dement's Sleep Dreams' as he had promised him he would. The goal is to retain the original spirit of the course as the content is continuously updated to reflect current state of sleep science. The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci
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