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1 - 10 of 36 results for: PHYSICS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

How do stars form from the gas in galaxies? How do stars and galaxies evolve, and how can these processes give rise to planets and the conditions suitable for life? How do we, from our little corner of the cosmos, collect and decipher information about the Universe? This course covers the solar system and celestial motions, the life cycle of stars, the structure of our Milky Way galaxy, and the discovery of exoplanets: planets orbiting stars beyond our Sun. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, the material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing and observatory field trips supplement the coursework.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 23: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics

How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Students learn to represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. The wave nature of light is used to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena. Geometric optics is employed to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. These descriptions are combined to understand the workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or PHYSICS 21S.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Linde, A. (PI)

PHYSICS 24: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics Laboratory

Guided hands-on exploration of concepts in electricity and magnetism, circuits and optics with an emphasis on student predictions, observations and explanations. Introduction to multimeters and oscilloscopes. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 23.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Devin, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 41: Mechanics

How are motions of objects in the physical world determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and then understand why motions have the form they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how the important physical principles in mechanics, such as conservation of momentum and energy for translational and rotational motion, follow from just three laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion. The distinction made between fundamental laws of nature and empirical rules that are useful approximations for more complex physics. Problems are drawn from examples of mechanics in everyday life. Skills developed in verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly vector representations and operations, and calculus. Physical understanding is fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sec more »
How are motions of objects in the physical world determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and then understand why motions have the form they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how the important physical principles in mechanics, such as conservation of momentum and energy for translational and rotational motion, follow from just three laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion. The distinction made between fundamental laws of nature and empirical rules that are useful approximations for more complex physics. Problems are drawn from examples of mechanics in everyday life. Skills developed in verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly vector representations and operations, and calculus. Physical understanding is fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem-solving. Please enroll in a section that you can attend regularly. In order to register for this class students who have never taken an introductory Physics course at Stanford must complete the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Students who complete the Physics Placement Diagnostic by 3 PM (Pacific) on Friday will have their hold lifted over the weekend. Minimum prerequisites: High school physics and MATH 19 (or equivalent high school calculus if sufficiently rigorous). Minimum co-requisite: MATH 20 or equivalent (if possible, taking Math 20 as a prerequisite and Math 21 as a co-requisite is recommended). Since high school math classes vary widely, it is recommended that you take at least one math class at Stanford before or concurrently with Physics 41. In addition, it is recommended that you take Math 51 or CME 100 before taking the next course in the Physics 40 series, Physics 43.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 42: Classical Mechanics Laboratory

Hands-on exploration of concepts in classical mechanics: Newton's laws, conservation laws, rotational motion. Introduction to laboratory techniques, experimental equipment and data analysis. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1

PHYSICS 43: Electricity and Magnetism

What is electricity? What is magnetism? How are they related? How do these phenomena manifest themselves in the physical world? The theory of electricity and magnetism, as codified by Maxwell's equations, underlies much of the observable universe. Students develop both conceptual and quantitative knowledge of this theory. Topics include: electrostatics; magnetostatics; simple AC and DC circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors; integral form of Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves. Principles illustrated in the context of modern technologies. Broader scientific questions addressed include: How do physical theories evolve? What is the interplay between basic physical theories and associated technologies? Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly differential and integral calculus, and vectors. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 52 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 44: Electricity and Magnetism Lab

Hands-on exploration of concepts in electricity, magnetism, and circuits. Introduction to multimeters, function generators, oscilloscopes, and graphing techniques. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Devin, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 71: Quantum and Thermal Physics

(Second in a three-part series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 71, PHYSICS 81.) This course introduces the foundations of quantum mechanics and thermodynamics to students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Topics related to quantum mechanics include: atoms, electrons, and nuclei. Experimental evidence for physics that is not explained by classical mechanics and E&M. Quantization of light, Planck's constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling. Topics related to thermodynamics: limitations of classical mechanics in describing systems with a very large number of particles. Ideal gas, equipartition, heat capacity, the defin more »
(Second in a three-part series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 71, PHYSICS 81.) This course introduces the foundations of quantum mechanics and thermodynamics to students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Topics related to quantum mechanics include: atoms, electrons, and nuclei. Experimental evidence for physics that is not explained by classical mechanics and E&M. Quantization of light, Planck's constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling. Topics related to thermodynamics: limitations of classical mechanics in describing systems with a very large number of particles. Ideal gas, equipartition, heat capacity, the definition of temperature, entropy. A brief introduction to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Maxwell speed distribution, ideal gas in a box. Laws of thermodynamics. Cycles, heat engines, free energy. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 61, MATH 51, or 61CM. Corequisite: MATH 52 or 62CM. This course was offered as PHYSICS 65 prior to Academic Year 2022-2023.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR

PHYSICS 71L: Modern Physics Laboratory

Experiments are drawn from optics, heat, and modern physics. Pre- or co-requisite: Physics 71.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Pam, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 83N: Physics in the 21st Century

Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics - everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome more »
Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics - everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome to contribute to the discussion about these big ideas. Learning Goals: By the end of the quarter you will be able to explain the major questions that drive physics research to your friends and peers. You will understand how scientists study the impossibly small and impossibly large and be able to convey this knowledge in clear and concise terms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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