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1 - 10 of 34 results for: LINGUIST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LINGUIST 35: Minds and Machines (CS 24, PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Students must take this course before being approved to declare Symbolic Systems as a major. All students interested in studying Symbolic Systems are urged to take this course early in their student careers. The course material and presentation will be at an introductory level, without prerequisites. If you have any questions about the course, please email symsys1staff@gmail.com.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

Every time you speak a word, you say it differently than the time before. Getting all the movements used during speech production to produce an exact repetition of a word is nearly impossible. Your friends and family also vary in how they say words, and this variation differs across speech styles, emotions, and social communities. Imagine that. Our minds encounter thousands of different productions of a single word, but somehow identify it as one word, and not another. Phonetics is the systematic study of the articulation, acoustics, and perception in speech and can help us explain how different talkers vary their speech, how information from speech is used by listeners to understand one another, and how listeners store social and linguistic information in memory. Through lectures, class activities, and weekly lab assignments, this class highlights both the complexity of the physical nature of speech production, how we can understand the resulting acoustic signal, and how that signal i more »
Every time you speak a word, you say it differently than the time before. Getting all the movements used during speech production to produce an exact repetition of a word is nearly impossible. Your friends and family also vary in how they say words, and this variation differs across speech styles, emotions, and social communities. Imagine that. Our minds encounter thousands of different productions of a single word, but somehow identify it as one word, and not another. Phonetics is the systematic study of the articulation, acoustics, and perception in speech and can help us explain how different talkers vary their speech, how information from speech is used by listeners to understand one another, and how listeners store social and linguistic information in memory. Through lectures, class activities, and weekly lab assignments, this class highlights both the complexity of the physical nature of speech production, how we can understand the resulting acoustic signal, and how that signal is interpreted and understood by listeners. By the end of this course, you will be able to (1) look at a visual representation of speech and understand what you are looking at; (2) manipulate speech samples to understand how listeners experience language and categorize different speech sounds; (3) understand the processes involved in articulating speech sounds; (4) explain how linguistic segments interact with cues to emotion, gender, and other macro-social attributes; and (5) identify the ways an understanding of speech variation can be used to advance our understanding of spoken language understanding my humans and machines. We will be using the software program Praat (https://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/) weekly, beginning the first week of class. Please download the program and have it installed on your computer before class begins.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 130A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 230A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include logical semantics, conversational implicature, presupposition, and speech acts. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as  PHIL 150  or 151, should attend section. Prerequisites: LINGUIST 1, SYMSYS 1 ( LINGUIST 35), consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 145: Introduction to Psycholinguistics (LINGUIST 245A, PSYCH 140)

How do people do things with language? How do we go from perceiving the acoustic waves that reach our ears to understanding that someone just announced the winner of the presidential election? How do we go from a thought to spelling that thought out in a sentence? How do babies learn language from scratch? This course is a practical introduction to psycholinguistics -- the study of how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. The course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of both the research methodologies used in psycholinguistic research and many of the well-established findings in the field. Topics covered will include visual and auditory recognition of words, sentence comprehension, reading, discourse and inference, sentence production, language acquisition, language in the brain, and language disorders. Students will conduct a small but original research project and gain experience with reporting and critiquing psycholinguistic research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

LINGUIST 150: Language and Society

This course explores the social life of spoken language. Students learn to address the following big questions about language and society: Why do languages vary across different time periods, locations, and social groups? What do our opinions about the way other people speak tell us about society? How do our social identities and goals influence the way we speak? And how do we use language to alter our social relationships? In addition to weekly reading responses, students complete a quarter-long project highlighting quantitative analyses of linguistic variation. Students taking the course for four units write up their project as a full research paper, including literature review and discussion. Students taking the course for three units can choose to complete a shorter paper that aims to improve public awareness about sociolinguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-EDP

LINGUIST 157: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 257)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Prerequisite: 105, 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 160: Historical Linguistics

Principles of historical linguistics:, the nature of language change. Kinds and causes of change, variation and diffusion of changes through populations, differentiation of dialects and languages, determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, the reconstruction of ancestral languages and intermediate changes, parallels with cultural and genetic evolutionary theory, and implications of variation and change for the description and explanation of language in general. Prerequisite: introductory course in linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 180: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 280)

Extracting meaning, information, and structure from human language text, speech, web pages, social networks. Introducing methods (regex, edit distance, naive Bayes, logistic regression, neural embeddings, inverted indices, collaborative filtering, PageRank), applications (chatbots, sentiment analysis, information retrieval, question answering, text classification, social networks, recommender systems), and ethical issues in both. Prerequisites: CS106B
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 195A: Undergraduate Research Workshop

Designed for undergraduates beginning or working on research projects in linguistics. Participants present and receive feedback on their projects and receive tips on the research and writing process.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Lu, J. (PI)

LINGUIST 196: Introduction to Research for Undergraduates

Introduction to linguistic research via presentations by Stanford linguistics faculty and graduate students. Open to undergraduate students interested in linguistics. Required for linguistics majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Lu, J. (PI)
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