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1 - 10 of 12 results for: ITALIAN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

Are humans free and self-determining agents possessed of infinite potential or limited beings subject to the vagaries of fortune? What is the relationship between love and beauty? Is it better for a leader to inspire love or fear? These are the kind of questions Renaissance thinkers asked and we will pursue in our study of the literature, art, and history of Italy from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. In this course, you will become acquainted with major writers, thinkers, and artists, and key ideas, innovations, and movements. Examining masterpieces of literature (poetry and prose), art (painting, drawing and sculpture), theater and music, including works of the High Renaissance, we will explore such topics as love, power, faith, reason, and contingency in human affairs. With the themes of discovery, invention and adaption as our guide, we will reflect on perennial tensions between imitation and inspiration, tradition and innovation, and conformity and transgression in Renaissance and early modern Italy. Taught in Italian. Recommended: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian). This course fulfills the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ITALIAN 141: The Pen and the Sword: A Gendered History (COMPLIT 140, FEMGEN 141B, HISTORY 261P)

As weapons, the pen and the sword have been used to wound, punish, and condemn as well as to protect, liberate, and elevate. Historically entangled with ideals of heroism, nobility, and civility, the pen and the sword have been the privileged instruments of men. Yet, throughout history, women have picked up the pen and the sword in defense, despair, and outrage as well as with passion, vision, and inspiration. This course is dedicated to them, and to study of works on love, sex, and power that articulate female experience. In our readings and seminars, we will encounter real and fictive women in their own words and in narrations and depictions by others from classical antiquity to the present, with a special focus on the Renaissance and on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Touching on such topics as flattery and slander through the study of misogynistic, protofeminist, and feminist works in the early modern and modern periods in various European literary traditions, we will con more »
As weapons, the pen and the sword have been used to wound, punish, and condemn as well as to protect, liberate, and elevate. Historically entangled with ideals of heroism, nobility, and civility, the pen and the sword have been the privileged instruments of men. Yet, throughout history, women have picked up the pen and the sword in defense, despair, and outrage as well as with passion, vision, and inspiration. This course is dedicated to them, and to study of works on love, sex, and power that articulate female experience. In our readings and seminars, we will encounter real and fictive women in their own words and in narrations and depictions by others from classical antiquity to the present, with a special focus on the Renaissance and on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Touching on such topics as flattery and slander through the study of misogynistic, protofeminist, and feminist works in the early modern and modern periods in various European literary traditions, we will consider questions of truth and falsehood in fiction and in life. Course materials span a variety genres and media, from poetry, letters, dialogues, public lectures, treatises, short stories, and drama to painting, sculpture, music, and film works regarded for their aesthetic, intellectual, religious, social, and political value and impact.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 199: Individual Work

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 200: Italian Modernities: Lecture Series and Course (ITALIAN 300)

Lecture series and seminar on modern Italian literature, cinema, and culture. While we emphasize the 20th and 21st centuries, we will include medieval and renaissance topics also. We invite 3-6 speakers per year to address us about their recent work or work in progress, so as to get a better knowledge of very recent trends in the field of Italian studies, both in the US and abroad. Seminar meetings, when speakers are not invited, are for the following: (a) preparation and follow-up discussion of speakers' work; (b) presentation of students work in progress; (c) presentation of books reviews on recent work in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)

ITALIAN 213: Trauma and Disenchantment in Post-War Italy

Italian Neorealism was a flourishing literary and film movement in post-war Italy. The first half ofthis course will deal with some of its major novels, including Italo Calvino's "The Path to the Nest of Spiders", Beppe Fenoglio's "A Private Matter", and Primo Levi's "Survival in Auschwitz". Through these novels we will seek to understand Italy's experience of World War II and the complexities of the altered social and psychological conditions of everyday life during this time. The second half of the course will focus on neorealist film as a response to the trauma of the war. We will explore how the cinematic medium both reflects on and reacts to tragedy. Movies such as "Bicycle Thief" [Vittorio de Sica], "Rome, Open City" [Roberto Rossellini], "La Dolce Vita" [Federico Fellini], and "La Terra Trema" [Luchino Visconti] will be considered.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Mollo, V. (PI)

ITALIAN 221: Giambattista Vico (COMPLIT 221, FRENCH 212, FRENCH 321, ITALIAN 321)

An intensive reading of Vico's book - New Science. Emphasis will be on Vico's philosophy of history and theories of poetic wisdom, myth, and language. Vico will be put in dialogue with René Descartes, Rousseau, Auguste Compte, Claude Lévi Strauss, and Paul Feyerabend, whose ideas about myth and science converge in striking ways with Vico's.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 300: Italian Modernities: Lecture Series and Course (ITALIAN 200)

Lecture series and seminar on modern Italian literature, cinema, and culture. While we emphasize the 20th and 21st centuries, we will include medieval and renaissance topics also. We invite 3-6 speakers per year to address us about their recent work or work in progress, so as to get a better knowledge of very recent trends in the field of Italian studies, both in the US and abroad. Seminar meetings, when speakers are not invited, are for the following: (a) preparation and follow-up discussion of speakers' work; (b) presentation of students work in progress; (c) presentation of books reviews on recent work in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)
Instructors: Mollo, V. (PI)

ITALIAN 321: Giambattista Vico (COMPLIT 221, FRENCH 212, FRENCH 321, ITALIAN 221)

An intensive reading of Vico's book - New Science. Emphasis will be on Vico's philosophy of history and theories of poetic wisdom, myth, and language. Vico will be put in dialogue with René Descartes, Rousseau, Auguste Compte, Claude Lévi Strauss, and Paul Feyerabend, whose ideas about myth and science converge in striking ways with Vico's.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 343: Deep Tech at the Intersection of Literature, Philosophy, and Society

The Oxford English Dictionary defines "Deep Tech" as "the part of the World Wide Web that is not discoverable by means of standard search engines." When startups and companies around Silicon Valley describe themselves as "deep-tech," it means that they employ methods and technologies that are not available on the mainstream market. What does it mean to practice "Deep Tech" from a Humanities point of view? It means to leverage literary and philosophical concepts and methods so that we can: 1) tackle change, and b) evaluate proposals and new technologies for their coherence, viability, and ethical implications. Three such concepts are judgment, moderation, and love. Accordingly, the course is structured in three parts: In the first part, we will talk about the role of aesthetic evaluations in the practice of judgment as a form of deep collective thinking. Readings on the topic will include texts by Hannah Arendt, Simone Weil, David N. Rodowick, and Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio (1883). In th more »
The Oxford English Dictionary defines "Deep Tech" as "the part of the World Wide Web that is not discoverable by means of standard search engines." When startups and companies around Silicon Valley describe themselves as "deep-tech," it means that they employ methods and technologies that are not available on the mainstream market. What does it mean to practice "Deep Tech" from a Humanities point of view? It means to leverage literary and philosophical concepts and methods so that we can: 1) tackle change, and b) evaluate proposals and new technologies for their coherence, viability, and ethical implications. Three such concepts are judgment, moderation, and love. Accordingly, the course is structured in three parts: In the first part, we will talk about the role of aesthetic evaluations in the practice of judgment as a form of deep collective thinking. Readings on the topic will include texts by Hannah Arendt, Simone Weil, David N. Rodowick, and Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio (1883). In the second part, we will discuss the concept of limit (or moderation) as envisioned by Albert Camus, the Italian sociologist Franco Cassano, and Karel Capek's play Rossum's Universal Robots (1920). Finally, we will talk about the idea of love and what it means to receive a political education in emotions as outlined by Martha C. Nussbaum through Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ilievska, A. (PI)

ITALIAN 395: Philosophical Reading Group (COMPLIT 359A, FRENCH 395)

Discussion of one contemporary or historical text from the Western philosophical tradition per quarter in a group of faculty and graduate students. For admission of new participants, a conversation with Professor Robert Harrison is required. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)
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