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1 - 8 of 8 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMRTS 101: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice

This course will introduce students to the philosophical and historical foundations for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international and domestic legal frameworks currently in force to protect and promote these rights. Students will learn about the broad landscape of institutions responsible for defining and enforcing human rights from scholars who study the institutions, and practitioners who have worked inside them. Throughout the quarter we will read and discuss critical scholarship about the gap between the promises and aspirations of international human rights covenants, and the ongoing realities of widespread oppression, exploitation, and atrocity happening around the world. We will welcome practitioners as well as guest faculty from departments across the university whose teaching and research touches on aspects of human rights within their respective fields of expertise. Throughout the course, we will explore how distinct perspectives, assumptions, and vocab more »
This course will introduce students to the philosophical and historical foundations for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international and domestic legal frameworks currently in force to protect and promote these rights. Students will learn about the broad landscape of institutions responsible for defining and enforcing human rights from scholars who study the institutions, and practitioners who have worked inside them. Throughout the quarter we will read and discuss critical scholarship about the gap between the promises and aspirations of international human rights covenants, and the ongoing realities of widespread oppression, exploitation, and atrocity happening around the world. We will welcome practitioners as well as guest faculty from departments across the university whose teaching and research touches on aspects of human rights within their respective fields of expertise. Throughout the course, we will explore how distinct perspectives, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. HUMRTS 101 fulfills the gateway course requirement for the Minor in Human Rights, and is offered once per year, winter quarter. No prior knowledge or formal human rights education is required of students enrolling in this introductory course. Students of all years and majors are welcome to join. Students should enroll in Section 01 of the course for in-person instruction Tu/Th 4:30-6:30pm. Optional office hours will be offered after 6:30pm. Enrollment in Section 02 is available only by special consent of the instructor, for students with special circumstances who need to complete HUMRTS 101 for the Minor, but cannot regularly attend the class in person as scheduled for Section 01. Students enrolled in Section 02 will complete identical curriculum, and will engage with classmates from Section 02 on a single Canvas site, but will have asynchronous and remote scheduling options for lectures. These same asynchronous and remote options can also be made available to Section 01 students (if/when needed, at discrete times throughout the quarter) in the event of COVID-related disruptions to class (e.g. instructor illness, student quarantine). Learning Objectives:-discern the ethical issues at stake in individual and collective decisions.-evaluate competing ethical perspectives on human problems and action.-distinguish facts from values.-identify, understand, and use multiple normative concepts and arguments.-articulate and critically evaluate distinct ethical perspectives on concrete dilemmas.-apply the methods of research and inquiry from social science to the study of human behavior in social, political, and economic organizations.-analyze the origins of social institutions and social structures.-analyze the effects of one or more kinds of social institutions and social structures on human action.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ER
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 106: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116, CLASSICS 216, ETHICSOC 106)

The course examines core human rights concepts and issues as they arise in a variety of contexts ranging from the ancient world to today. These issues include slavery, human trafficking, gender based violence, discrimination against marginalized groups, and how these and other issues are linked to war, internal conflict, and imperialism. We will consider the ways in which such issues emerge, are explicitly treated, or are ignored in a variety of historical and contemporary settings with a particular emphasis on the impact that war and conflict have on laws and norms that in principle aim to protect individuals from violence and exploitation. This inquiry also entails consideration of the modern notion of the universality of human rights based on a conception of a common humanity and how alien that concept is in states and communities that define or embody hierarchies that systematically exclude groups or populations from the protections and respect that other groups and individuals are more »
The course examines core human rights concepts and issues as they arise in a variety of contexts ranging from the ancient world to today. These issues include slavery, human trafficking, gender based violence, discrimination against marginalized groups, and how these and other issues are linked to war, internal conflict, and imperialism. We will consider the ways in which such issues emerge, are explicitly treated, or are ignored in a variety of historical and contemporary settings with a particular emphasis on the impact that war and conflict have on laws and norms that in principle aim to protect individuals from violence and exploitation. This inquiry also entails consideration of the modern notion of the universality of human rights based on a conception of a common humanity and how alien that concept is in states and communities that define or embody hierarchies that systematically exclude groups or populations from the protections and respect that other groups and individuals are afforded. Nowhere do the devastating consequences of such exclusions become clearer than in times of crisis and conflict. The course draws upon a variety of case studies from the Greco-Roman world and other temporal and geographical contexts to explore the political and social dynamics that shape and inform the violence inherent in such events.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ER
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 108: Advanced Spanish Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL. Through the HUMRTS 108 units, students will have the opportunity to apply their advanced Spanish language skills and knowledge of the US immigration detention system from the class as volunteers with immigrant rights advocacy organizations. Students will be trained to staff a hotline to help monitor detention conditions in more than 200 immigrant prisons, report abuse, expose dehumanizing conditions, and request support on behalf of detainees and their loved ones. Human rights lawyer Penelope Van Tuyl will guest lecture to give students legal context, and we will have the visits as well of other specialists in US-Central American international relations, mental health, media, and art activism. We will also be joined by migrants and refugees who will share their stories in US detention and seeking asylum. This course requires permission from the instructor to enroll. Please email instructor Vivian Brates vbrates@stanford.edu to get a link to the appropriate web form. Please note that this course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Brates, V. (PI)

HUMRTS 117: International Human Rights (INTLPOL 355)

( LAW 5010) In part as a result of the rise of international human rights mechanisms in the twentieth century, conflicts over resources, privileges and power are now increasingly mediated through the lens of human rights, in terms of the protection of individual or group rights. Given that many of the most significant and complex national and international challenges today center on fundamental questions of human rights, understanding the legal regime that governs these rights is an important part of a comprehensive legal education. This course serves as an introduction to the law, theory and practice of international human rights, together with the instruments, organizations and arrangements that affect their implementation and enforcement. It will explore human rights as a philosophical and legal concept, and briefly probe differences between human rights, civil rights, and development frames. The course will then focus on the legal regime through which sovereign states have establis more »
( LAW 5010) In part as a result of the rise of international human rights mechanisms in the twentieth century, conflicts over resources, privileges and power are now increasingly mediated through the lens of human rights, in terms of the protection of individual or group rights. Given that many of the most significant and complex national and international challenges today center on fundamental questions of human rights, understanding the legal regime that governs these rights is an important part of a comprehensive legal education. This course serves as an introduction to the law, theory and practice of international human rights, together with the instruments, organizations and arrangements that affect their implementation and enforcement. It will explore human rights as a philosophical and legal concept, and briefly probe differences between human rights, civil rights, and development frames. The course will then focus on the legal regime through which sovereign states have established human rights instruments and doctrine as part of positive international law, sometimes with binding domestic legal effects. We will review the foundations and history of international human rights law; the major international and regional human rights instruments and institutions; mechanisms and strategies of enforcement; and selected current issues in the field. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Exam. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students may request enrollment by sending a statement of interest to Professor Achiume (achiume@ law.stanford.edu). Requests will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must have completed HUMRTS 101 as a prerequisite.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Achiume, E. (PI)

HUMRTS 123: Current Issues in Southeast Asia (INTLPOL 226)

Current Issues in Southeast Asia ( INTLPOL 226) is a seminar that will examine some of the key challenges facing the nations of Southeast Asia, which collectively boast the world's fifth largest economy and are home to some 680 million people. After a brief introduction to the region's history and geography, students will review the region's political systems and -- using country-specific case studies -- look at how they are dealing with issues such as democracy versus authoritarianism, ethnic and religious divisions, economic development, climate change, and China's rising influence. The course will cover all these issues in the context of some of the real-world factors, as opposed to theoretical concepts that influence and shape policies and decisions in the region, and which in many ways pose a threat to Southeast Asia's remarkable potential. It will also offer an opportunity for students to learn about the policymaking process and policy-related writing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Marciel, S. (PI)

HUMRTS 196: Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab (EARTHSYS 196A)

The Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab is an intellectual hub and supportive learning community for students engaging in environmental justice and human rights work of any kind. Environmental justice (EJ) advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism, and human rights (HR) center on the notion that all people, by virtue of their existence and regardless of any given status or classification, are equally entitled to fundamental rights and protections. Our semi-structured weekly sessions will foster an open learning environment for students and peer-to-peer learning connections. Sessions will include giving and receiving feedback on capstone or community-based projects, independent research, or other relevant coursework or extracurricular activity. We also welcome students who are new to these topics and would like to learn more. We are open to students of all backgrounds and disciplines at any stage of their research or project work. Followi more »
The Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab is an intellectual hub and supportive learning community for students engaging in environmental justice and human rights work of any kind. Environmental justice (EJ) advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism, and human rights (HR) center on the notion that all people, by virtue of their existence and regardless of any given status or classification, are equally entitled to fundamental rights and protections. Our semi-structured weekly sessions will foster an open learning environment for students and peer-to-peer learning connections. Sessions will include giving and receiving feedback on capstone or community-based projects, independent research, or other relevant coursework or extracurricular activity. We also welcome students who are new to these topics and would like to learn more. We are open to students of all backgrounds and disciplines at any stage of their research or project work. Following EJ and HR principles, we seek to center local, contextualised knowledge and leadership through ethical research partnerships with community members. To do so, we follow community-based participatory research approaches and decolonizing methodologies. Examples of our work to date include 1) enabling graduate students to effectively bring EJ and HR approaches into dissertation research, 2) supporting campus leaders and directly participating in diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) initiatives, and 3) educating and learning from one another about critical EJ and HR scholarship and anti-racist approaches to our work. Lab interests include addressing inequitable impacts of climate change, advancing decolonial approaches to land and water management, promoting food justice, combatting human trafficking and labor exploitation, promoting fair and just immigration policies, and additional EJ and HR research topics. Note that this lab is intended as an open space for engagement. If you are unable to enroll for credit, but would still like to participate, please email humanrights@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

HUMRTS 198: Independent Study or Directed Reading in Human Rights

May be repeated for credit. Students using these units toward the Minor in Human Rights must take for a letter grade. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact denisefz@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

HUMRTS 199: Capstone Project: Human Rights Minor

Students completing a required capstone project for the Minor in Human Rights must enroll in this course for units with their capstone adviser selected as the instructor. Students must agree with their capstone advisor how many units (3-5) their proposed capstone project is worth, and enroll accordingly. This course is open only to Human Rights Minors. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact denisefz@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from your advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
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