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1 - 10 of 18 results for: ETHICSOC ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ETHICSOC 22A: Searching Together after the Common Good: An Introduction to Ethics in the Western Tradition (SLE 22A)

Important works from the Western tradition will be used to construct and explore some basic frameworks for ethical thinking. Students will gain a familiarity with some canonical texts and develop skills of close-reading and group discussion when it comes to ethical inquiry. Course texts can vary by quarter and year but will include a mix of canonical philosophical, religious, and literary texts. NOTE: Former SLE students should sign up for the ETHICSOC 22A/ ETHICSOC 22B listings. SLE 22A/ SLE 22B are courses in ethics for high school students, taught primarily through an history based humanities curriculum. Stanford Student's participation in this course will include classroom experience with the high school students, as well as time with the course instructors to discuss, evaluate, and reflect on the course design.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Watkins, G. (PI)

ETHICSOC 24SI: Deliberative Discussions

Deliberative Discussions arose out of an initiative of the ASSU Undergraduate Senate and offers the opportunity for students with different political beliefs and backgrounds to share food with one another and discuss controversial issues that are important to them. After some initial framing and norm setting by the instructor, students select their own topics and identify readings for each other to discuss. Students will practice active listening and build trust through the process of civil dialogue and mutual exchange. Enrollment is by application only, which you can learn about here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LI19m7rg90Bdf81xIIMK1cdNsrCBnGjRIW2s7V15MLo/edit. Please contact Collin Anthony Chen (canthony@stanford.edu) with any questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Chen, C. (PI)

ETHICSOC 106: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116, CLASSICS 216, HUMRTS 106)

The course examines core human rights concepts and issues as they arise in a variety of contexts ranging from the ancient world to today. These issues include slavery, human trafficking, gender based violence, discrimination against marginalized groups, and how these and other issues are linked to war, internal conflict, and imperialism. We will consider the ways in which such issues emerge, are explicitly treated, or are ignored in a variety of historical and contemporary settings with a particular emphasis on the impact that war and conflict have on laws and norms that in principle aim to protect individuals from violence and exploitation. This inquiry also entails consideration of the modern notion of the universality of human rights based on a conception of a common humanity and how alien that concept is in states and communities that define or embody hierarchies that systematically exclude groups or populations from the protections and respect that other groups and individuals are more »
The course examines core human rights concepts and issues as they arise in a variety of contexts ranging from the ancient world to today. These issues include slavery, human trafficking, gender based violence, discrimination against marginalized groups, and how these and other issues are linked to war, internal conflict, and imperialism. We will consider the ways in which such issues emerge, are explicitly treated, or are ignored in a variety of historical and contemporary settings with a particular emphasis on the impact that war and conflict have on laws and norms that in principle aim to protect individuals from violence and exploitation. This inquiry also entails consideration of the modern notion of the universality of human rights based on a conception of a common humanity and how alien that concept is in states and communities that define or embody hierarchies that systematically exclude groups or populations from the protections and respect that other groups and individuals are afforded. Nowhere do the devastating consequences of such exclusions become clearer than in times of crisis and conflict. The course draws upon a variety of case studies from the Greco-Roman world and other temporal and geographical contexts to explore the political and social dynamics that shape and inform the violence inherent in such events.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ER
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

ETHICSOC 127B: Leadership, Organizing and Action: Intensive (CSRE 127B, URBANST 127B)

Two Consecutive Weekend Course: Community Organizing makes a difference in addressing major public challenges that demand full engagement of the citizenry, especially those whose voices are marginalized. In this course you will learn and practice the leadership skills needed to mobilize your communities for positive social change. We identify leadership as accepting responsibility to enable others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty. As organizers you will learn how to develop capacity within your community and analyze power dynamics to develop a strategic plan. By the end of this course, you will create an organizing campaign that builds power rooted in the resources of your community. The class will be an intensive held the first two weekends of winter quarter, Jan 13-15 and Jan 20-22, 2023. Class begins on Friday in the afternoon and runs through early Sunday evening.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

ETHICSOC 127C: Leadership, Organizing and Action: Campaign Coaching (URBANST 127C)

Community Organizing makes a difference in addressing major public challenges that demand full engagement of the citizenry, especially those whose voices are marginalized. In this course you will learn and practice the leadership skills of campaign coaching in order to facilitate others to mobilize their communities for positive social change. Enrollment by consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

ETHICSOC 130A: Classical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought (CLASSICS 181, CLASSICS 381, PHIL 176A, PHIL 276A, POLISCI 230A, POLISCI 330A)

Political philosophy in classical antiquity, centered on reading canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle against other texts and against the political and historical background. Topics include: interdependence, legitimacy, justice; political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; law, civic strife, and constitutional change.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 135F: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 135W, COMM 235, COMM 335, POLISCI 234P, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

ETHICSOC 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (INTNLREL 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

Our world is divided into many different states, each of which has its own culture or set of cultures. Vast inequalities of wealth and power exist between citizens of the rich world and the global poor. International commerce, immigration, and climate change entwine our lives in ways that transcend borders. It is in this context that problems of global justice, which relate to the normative obligations that arise from our international order, emerge. What demands (if any) does justice impose on institutions and individuals acting in a global context? Is it morally permissible to prioritize the welfare of our compatriots over the welfare of foreigners? Do states have the right to control their borders? What are the responsibilities (if any) of wealthy states, consumers, and multinational corporations to the global poor? This course explores longstanding problems of global justice via a discussion of contemporary issues, including: global poverty, immigration, human rights, economic sanc more »
Our world is divided into many different states, each of which has its own culture or set of cultures. Vast inequalities of wealth and power exist between citizens of the rich world and the global poor. International commerce, immigration, and climate change entwine our lives in ways that transcend borders. It is in this context that problems of global justice, which relate to the normative obligations that arise from our international order, emerge. What demands (if any) does justice impose on institutions and individuals acting in a global context? Is it morally permissible to prioritize the welfare of our compatriots over the welfare of foreigners? Do states have the right to control their borders? What are the responsibilities (if any) of wealthy states, consumers, and multinational corporations to the global poor? This course explores longstanding problems of global justice via a discussion of contemporary issues, including: global poverty, immigration, human rights, economic sanctions, resource and land claims, reparations for colonialism, and climate change. There are no easy answers to these questions, and the complexity of these issues requires an interdisciplinary approach. While there are several possible theoretical approaches to problems of global justice, the approach taken in this course will be rooted in the Western tradition of liberal political philosophy and political theory. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with contemporary problems of global justice, be able to critically assess theoretical approaches to these problems, and be able to formulate and defend their own views on these complex issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER, GER:EC-EthicReas
Instructors: Soon, V. (PI)

ETHICSOC 175W: Philosophy of Law: Protest, Punishment, and Racial Justice (AFRICAAM 175, CSRE 175W, PHIL 175W, PHIL 275W, POLISCI 137, POLISCI 337)

In this course, we will examine some of the central questions in philosophy of law, including: What is law? How do we determine the content of laws? Do laws have moral content? What is authority? What gives law its authority? Must we obey the law? If so, why? How can we justify the law? How should we understand and respond to unjust laws? What is punishment? What is punishment for? What, if anything, justifies punishment by the state? What is enough punishment? What is too much punishment? What does justice require under nonideal conditions?
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Salkin, W. (PI)

ETHICSOC 178M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (EARTHSYS 178M, ETHICSOC 278M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, GER:EC-EthicReas
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