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1 - 10 of 44 results for: CLASSICS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CLASSICS 2G: Beginning Greek

Continuation of CLASSICS 1G. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Tennant, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 2L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 2.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 1L or equivalent placement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Waller, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 12G: Intermediate Greek: Herodotus

The goal of this course is to develop a greater fluency in Greek prose by reinforcing previously acquired knowledge of morphology and syntax through a close reading of Herodotus. We will read primarily from Book 1 of the Histories, along with some episodes in translation from the rest of the work. We will explore how Herodotus evaluates cultural differences and how his sense of 'investigative wonder' challenged his listeners' own assumptions and biases regarding the peoples and cultures around them. We will also familiarize ourselves with Herodotus' role in the development of historiography, as well as historiography's relationship with other genres, including poetry.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Tai, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 12L: Intermediate Latin: The Marvelous World of Pliny the Elder

Pliny the Elder wrote an encyclopedic account of nature in the 1st century CE. Through this text, the Naturalis Historia, we may glimpse the wondrous and strange animals, plants, and minerals that populated the early Roman imperial world and how Pliny imagined they pertained to Roman imperial subjects. In this course, we will read widely throughout the Naturalis Historia. Our primarily objective will be to read diverse excerpts of Pliny's text in its original Latin. We will also consider what relationship exists between the Naturalis Historia and Roman imperialism, how Pliny composed his text, and why this early example of the history of science remains important for understanding the ancient world today.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Gisch, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 16N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (FEMGEN 24N)

Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 19N: Eloquence Personified: How To Speak Like Cicero

This course is an introduction to Roman rhetoric, Cicero's Rome, and the active practice of speaking well. Participants read a short rhetorical treatise by Cicero, analyze one of his speeches as well as more recent ones by, e.g., Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and Obama, and watch their oratorical performances. During the remainder of the term they practice rhetoric, prepare and deliver in class two (short) speeches, and write an essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Krebs, C. (PI)

CLASSICS 21Q: Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe (ARCHLGY 21Q)

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, Writing 2, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 47: Ancient Knowledge, New Frontiers: How the Greek Legacy Became Islamic Science (COMPLIT 107A, HUMCORE 121)

What is the relation between magic and science? Is religion compatible with the scientific method? Are there patterns in the stars? What is a metaphor? This course will read key moments in Greek and Islamic science and philosophy and investigate the philosophy of language, mathematical diagrams, manuscripts, the madrasa, free will, predestination, and semantic logic. We will read selections from Ibn Taymiya, Ibn Haytham, Omar Khayyam, Baha al-Din al-Amili, and others. This course is part of the Humanities Core, a collaborative set of global humanities seminars that brings all of its students and faculty into conversation. On Mondays you meet in your own course, and on Wednesdays all the HumCore seminars (in session that quarter) meet together: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

CLASSICS 56: Decolonizing the Western Canon: Introduction to Art and Architecture from Prehistory to Medieval (ARTHIST 1A)

Traditional Art History viewed the Renaissance as its pinnacle; it privileged linear perspective and lifelikeness and measured other traditions against this standard, neglecting art from the Near East, Egypt, the Middle Ages, or Islam. This course will disrupt this colonizing vision by conceptualizing artworks as "methexis" (participation, liveliness, or enactment) as opposed to mimesis (imitation or lifelikeness). We will study the development of the Western canon and its systematic eradication of difference through a renewed understanding of what an artwork is.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-EDP

CLASSICS 83: The Greeks (HISTORY 101)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom
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