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1 - 7 of 7 results for: CHILATST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHILATST 1SI: English Language Learner Coaching and Curriculum Development

The principal purpose of this course is to support Habla tutors language coaches in developing lesson plans and strategies to implement during theircoaching sessions with English language learners. The course equips students with a foundational understanding of English as a second language, practical experience with developing educational materials for language learning, and a collaborative space to reflect on their experiences as English language coaches.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Miano, A. (PI)

CHILATST 12D: Intro to English III: Latinx Literature (COMPLIT 165, ENGLISH 12D, FEMGEN 12D)

Emerging from the demographic, political, and cultural shifts of the late twentieth century, LatinX Literature flourishes in the twenty-first century as a hemispherically American corpus of texts. Like both ChicanX and Puerto Rican literatures before it, LatinX Literature emerges from various movements for social justice to challenge both the Anglo and the Hispanic established literary traditions of the Americas. As a transnational, pluralistic, heterogeneous, and dynamic category that considers the writings of diverse peoples with cultural ties to Latin America residing in the U.S., it complicates and transgresses the linguistic, geopolitical and cultural borders of the Americas, including those of the Afro-Caribbean, Luso-Brazilian, and the Native First Nations. Aligning itself with the issues, styles, and topics of the Global South, LatinX Literature is a product of the kind of 'border thinking' that critic Walter Mignolo has described as a 'pluriversal epistemology that interconnec more »
Emerging from the demographic, political, and cultural shifts of the late twentieth century, LatinX Literature flourishes in the twenty-first century as a hemispherically American corpus of texts. Like both ChicanX and Puerto Rican literatures before it, LatinX Literature emerges from various movements for social justice to challenge both the Anglo and the Hispanic established literary traditions of the Americas. As a transnational, pluralistic, heterogeneous, and dynamic category that considers the writings of diverse peoples with cultural ties to Latin America residing in the U.S., it complicates and transgresses the linguistic, geopolitical and cultural borders of the Americas, including those of the Afro-Caribbean, Luso-Brazilian, and the Native First Nations. Aligning itself with the issues, styles, and topics of the Global South, LatinX Literature is a product of the kind of 'border thinking' that critic Walter Mignolo has described as a 'pluriversal epistemology that interconnects the plurality and diversity of decolonial projects.' Acknowledging its emergence from literal and theoretical border spaces and decolonizing epistemologies, the 'X' of LatinX intentionally inflects the link to an origin in LGBTQI discourses signifying 'a more inclusive, non-gender-binary designation for LatinX peoples' and as a border literature that articulates heterogeneous ways of making meaning. Authors may include Jesus Colón, Sandra Cisneros, Helena Maria Viramontes, Christina Garcia, Junot Diaz, Ire´ne Lara Silva, Julia Alvarez, Américo Paredes, Daniel Alarcón, Francisco Goldman, Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Tato Laviera, Ernesto Quinonez, Erika Sanchez, Elizabeth Acevedo, Luis Valdez, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, Fernando Flores, or Oscar Cásares. NOTE: English majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

CHILATST 116: Latinx Social Movements

Latinx advocates, often through grassroots community organizing around social movement participation and electoral politics, have fought to ensure citizenship, civil rights, labor rights, environmental justice, immigrant rights, gender rights, sexuality rights, reproductive rights, and many more causes in the United States and across borders for decades. In this course, we will analyze the literature of Latinx social movements and various legal and political institutions impacting the U.S. Latinx community, such as electoral representation, labor, education, healthcare, housing, and recreation, as we examine the theories and methods that scholars incorporate to publish their conclusions. We will look at the Latinx community's historical challenges and their journeys to overcome economic disparities, as well as the role of race and racism, prejudice and discrimination, and anti-immigration policies directed at Latinx ethnic groups in the United States. This course will prepare students to conduct archival research on Latinx social movements in the Department of Special Collections and University Archives at Stanford.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

CHILATST 128: Spanish through Comics (ILAC 128)

The course, an exploration of the graphic narrative medium in Spanish, is open to intermediate and advanced Spanish speakers. We'll analyze vignettes, sections, or chapters from both auteur and pop-culture series. These may include Arrugas and Lola Vendetta (Spain), Mafalda, Macanudo, Naftalina, and El eternauta (Argentina), Los once and Caminos condenados (Colombia), Nos vamos (Ecuador/ Colombia), Vivos se los llevaron (Mexico), as well as Spy vs. Spy and My Favorite Thing is Monsters (ChicanX/LatinX). Secondary sources include McCloud, Mbembe, Chute, and Aldama. The through line will be representations and instantiations of power struggles in this deceivingly naive form. Visual narratological aspects and the specificity of the medium will also be discussed at length. Language learners and everyone who wants detailed feedback on their Spanish must enroll in the cognate course SPANLANG 121 "Concurrent Writing Support."
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Soler, C. (PI)

CHILATST 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

CHILATST 200W: Directed Reading

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

CHILATST 274: Mexican American History (HISTORY 274C, HISTORY 374C)

This course will explore the history of Mexican migrants and Mexican Americans from 1848 to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
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