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1 - 10 of 21 results for: CHEMENG ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHEMENG 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (ENGR 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

CHEMENG 31N: When Chemistry Meets Engineering

Preference to freshmen. Chemistry and engineering are subjects that are ubiquitous around us. But what happens when the two meet? Students will explore this question by diving into experimental problems that scientists and engineers have to face on a daily basis. Many processes that are taken for granted have been developed by understanding science at a very fundamental level and then applying it to large and important industrial processes. In this seminar, students will explore some of the basic concepts that are important to address chemical engineering problems through experimental work. Students will build materials for energy and environmental applications, understand how to separate mixtures into pure compounds, produce fuels, and will learn to look at the chemical properties of molecules that are part of daily life with a different eye.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CHEMENG 65Q: Chemical Engineering for Sustainability

Do you want to make the world more sustainable? How will we address the tremendous challenges that climate change brings? How can we reduce carbon emissions and not have huge disruptions in society? This class is for anyone who wants to create sustainable alternatives to what we use every day: engineers, scientists, those in humanities and the arts. Everyone has a role to play in designing our future. nnWe will learn how to make the world more sustainable by exploring the exciting new world of (chemical) engineering sustainability. We will discuss renewable diesel and jet fuels; synthetic meat; compostable plastics; building materials that save energy; direct capture of carbon from the air; biological pharmaceuticals; and advanced recycling operations. The class starts with a brief overview of the deep cuts in carbon emissions and other pollutants that will be needed. Then, we focus on how sustainable (chemical) engineering can provide a solution, visiting four companies who are changi more »
Do you want to make the world more sustainable? How will we address the tremendous challenges that climate change brings? How can we reduce carbon emissions and not have huge disruptions in society? This class is for anyone who wants to create sustainable alternatives to what we use every day: engineers, scientists, those in humanities and the arts. Everyone has a role to play in designing our future. nnWe will learn how to make the world more sustainable by exploring the exciting new world of (chemical) engineering sustainability. We will discuss renewable diesel and jet fuels; synthetic meat; compostable plastics; building materials that save energy; direct capture of carbon from the air; biological pharmaceuticals; and advanced recycling operations. The class starts with a brief overview of the deep cuts in carbon emissions and other pollutants that will be needed. Then, we focus on how sustainable (chemical) engineering can provide a solution, visiting four companies who are changing the world. Students will leave the class with an appreciation of how sustainable (chemical) engineering can help address climate change's substantial challenges, and perhaps an internship with one of the companies we visit. High school chemistry (balancing a chemical equation) and high school physics (unit conversions) are recommended for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Libicki, S. (PI)

CHEMENG 100: Chemical Process Modeling, Dynamics, and Control

Mathematical methods applied to engineering problems using chemical engineering examples. The development of mathematical models to describe chemical process dynamic behavior. Analytical and computer simulation techniques for the solution of ordinary differential equations. Dynamic behavior of linear first- and second-order systems. Introduction to process control. Dynamics and stability of controlled systems. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51&52 | Corequisite: Chemeng 20
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CHEMENG 110B: Multi-Component and Multi-Phase Thermodynamics

Statistical mechanics for mixtures of ideal gases and simple liquids, covering both closed and open ensembles, is introduced. Molecular interactions underlying the non-ideal gaseous and liquid properties and nontrivial equations of states are surveyed. Chemical potential is introduced and emphasized as the essential concept for understanding the cause of solution instability and the criteria for phase equilibria. In particular, the vapor-liquid equilibria for non-ideal mixtures are discussed, and the basic modeling approach for describing the realistic mixture behavior such as azeotrope is explained. The connection of chemical potential with fugacity and activity is discussed. The applications of the established framework to reactive mixtures and to interfacial properties between coexisting phases are explored. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 110A or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CHEMENG 120A: Fluid Mechanics

The flow of isothermal fluids from a momentum transport viewpoint. Continuum hypothesis, scalar and vector fields, fluid statics, non-Newtonian fluids, shell momentum balances, equations of motion and the Navier-Stokes equations, creeping and potential flow, parallel and nearly parallel flows, time-dependent parallel flows, boundary layer theory and separation, introduction to drag correlations. Prerequisites: junior in Chemical Engineering or consent of instructor; CHEMENG 100 and CME 102 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CHEMENG 170X: Mechanics of Soft Matter: Rheology (CHEMENG 470)

Soft matter comes in many forms and includes polymeric materials, suspensions, emulsions, foams, gels, and living tissue. These materials are characterized by being easily deformed and possessing internal relaxation time spectra. They are viscoelastic with responses that are intermediate between purely viscous liquids and perfectly elastic solids. This course provides an introduction to the subject of rheology, which concerns the deformation and flow of complex liquids and solids. Rheological testing is aimed at determining the relationships between the applied stresses in these materials and the resulting deformations. These are characterized by material functions, such as viscosity (shear and extensional), moduli, and compliances. These functions reflect the microstructure of the material being tested and microstructural models of polymers (single chain theories and reptation-based models), suspensions, emulsions, and foams will be presented. Experimental methods to measure materials more »
Soft matter comes in many forms and includes polymeric materials, suspensions, emulsions, foams, gels, and living tissue. These materials are characterized by being easily deformed and possessing internal relaxation time spectra. They are viscoelastic with responses that are intermediate between purely viscous liquids and perfectly elastic solids. This course provides an introduction to the subject of rheology, which concerns the deformation and flow of complex liquids and solids. Rheological testing is aimed at determining the relationships between the applied stresses in these materials and the resulting deformations. These are characterized by material functions, such as viscosity (shear and extensional), moduli, and compliances. These functions reflect the microstructure of the material being tested and microstructural models of polymers (single chain theories and reptation-based models), suspensions, emulsions, and foams will be presented. Experimental methods to measure materials subjected to both shearing and elongational deformations will be described. Many soft matter systems are influenced by interfacial phenomena (foams, emulsions, thin films in the human body) and interfacial rheological techniques will be discussed. Advanced undergraduates register for 170X; graduates register for 470. Prerequisites: ChE 120A or its equivalent (concurrent enrollment is permissible)
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CHEMENG 183: Biochemistry II (CHEM 183, CHEMENG 283)

Focus on metabolic biochemistry: the study of chemical reactions that provide the cell with the energy and raw materials necessary for life. Topics include glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the metabolism of glycogen, fatty acids, amino acids, and nucleotides as well as the macromolecular machines that synthesize RNA, DNA, and proteins. Medical relevance is emphasized throughout. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 181 or CHEM 141 or CHEMENG 181/281.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

CHEMENG 185A: Chemical Engineering Laboratory A

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence that focuses on critical thinking in experimental aspects of chemical engineering. Classroom discussion and weekly lab sections will emphasize experimental design, effective and safe laboratory practices, data analysis, and technical communication using a biofuels experimental system. Students will also work in teams to develop experimental projects to be carried out in the following quarter in CHEMENG185B. Satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 55
Terms: Win | Units: 5

CHEMENG 189: Career Building: Entrepreneurship / Intrapreneurship, People, Innovation, Decision-Making and Impact (CHEMENG 289, ENGR 289, RAD 189, RAD 289)

This course is designed to enable graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in science and engineering to hone strategies for career success. Drawing strongly on entrepreneurial principles and lessons from industry, the course complements the traditional curriculum by focusing on career-building tools that students need to improve their professional prospects and achieve their goals. Relevant for those who plan to pursue careers in academia and industry alike, a central focus will be on managing one's career as if it were a start-up, emphasizing principles that empower individuals to take more control of their futures: investing in yourself, building professional networks, taking intelligent risks, and making uncertainty and volatility work to one's advantage. Through a series of in-classroom presentations and interviews - with professors, entrepreneurs, executives, athletes, investors, and thought leaders from diverse fields and sectors - students will gain important knowl more »
This course is designed to enable graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in science and engineering to hone strategies for career success. Drawing strongly on entrepreneurial principles and lessons from industry, the course complements the traditional curriculum by focusing on career-building tools that students need to improve their professional prospects and achieve their goals. Relevant for those who plan to pursue careers in academia and industry alike, a central focus will be on managing one's career as if it were a start-up, emphasizing principles that empower individuals to take more control of their futures: investing in yourself, building professional networks, taking intelligent risks, and making uncertainty and volatility work to one's advantage. Through a series of in-classroom presentations and interviews - with professors, entrepreneurs, executives, athletes, investors, and thought leaders from diverse fields and sectors - students will gain important knowledge and practical strategies, with course modules on topics such as ideation and innovation, the skill of self-advocacy, the fundamentals of negotiation, building and managing teams, and effective communication and storytelling. Additional modules will focus on biotechnology and deep tech start-up companies, as well as strategies for cultivating a successful academic career. The idea for this course emerged from the instructor's reflections on 30 years of research, teaching, mentorship, and deep entrepreneurial experiences spanning the gamut of approaches to translational science - academic discovery, invention, conceiving of and leading multi-institutional research centers, building research and business teams, launching and financing start-ups, building business models to advance real-world applications of cutting-edge science, and seeing through research-based companies to success (including growing an idea into a multi-billion dollar company). For this course, students will be expected to complete relevant reading assignments, participate actively in class dialogue, and complete regular writing assignments focused on course topics as they relate to ones own career-building needs and professional aspirations. Students may also have opportunities to lead class discussions on topics of interest.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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