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31 - 40 of 207 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 146: American Dream, American Nightmare: A History of the United States in Art and Literature

Studying the American past, a person could despair or dream or both. In this course, we will move chronologically from the Revolutionary War to the present to consider artists and writers--some famous, some obscure--who've portrayed hope, who've portrayed anger and grief, who've taken it upon themselves to make contact with life as they've experienced and imagined it. Throughout, we will treat art and literature not as an illustration of facts, and not as a solution to social problems, but as a touchstone to who Americans have been and who they might become.
Last offered: Summer 2021

ARTHIST 147: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 347)

This course focuses on European and American art and visual culture between the mid-nineteenth and the mid-twentieth centuries. We will begin and end in Paris, exploring visual expressions of modernism as they were shaped by industrialization and urban renewal, the fantasies and realities of Orientalism and colonial exploitation, changing gender expectations, racial difference, and world war. Encompassing a wide range of media, the course explores modernism as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities challenged by the conditions of social life in the context of diversity and difference.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 152: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARTHIST 159B: American Photography Since 1960 (AMSTUD 159B, ARTHIST 359B)

Since the publication of Robert Frank's THE AMERICANS (1958), many distinguished American photographers have emerged, creating a density and power of expression that arguably rivals and even surpasses the extraordinary achievements of earlier photographers in this country. Garry Winogrand's street photography, Diane Arbus's portraits, Ralph Eugene Meatyard's grotesque masks, Danny Lyon's impassioned social outsiders, William Eggleston's deadpan sidewalks and suburban tables, and on to photographers of our moment--these are just a few of the topics the course will cover. Careful attention to individual pictures; careful consideration of what it is to be an artist, and a critic.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 160: Censorship in American Art (AMSTUD 167, CSRE 160, FEMGEN 167)

This course examines the art history of censorship in the United States. Paying special attention to the suppression of queer, Black and Latinx visual and performance art, including efforts to vandalize works and defund institutions, students will explore a variety of writing such as news articles, manifestos, letters, protest signs, scholarly texts, and court proceedings. The course approaches censorship as an act to restrict freedom of expression and, however unwittingly, as a mode of provocation and publicity.
Last offered: Autumn 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP

ARTHIST 162: Visual Arts Cuba (1959 - 2015) (ARTHIST 362)

The evolution of culture in post-1959 Cuba, with a strong focus on visual arts in all media and film will be introduced in this course. Historical examples will be discussed through lectures, readings and the presentation of audiovisual material. Students will develop their research, critical thinking, and writing through assignments, discussions, and the completion of a final paper. This is a discussion-heavy course, so come prepared to read, write and talk.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 163: Queer America (AMSTUD 163, FEMGEN 163)

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul

ARTHIST 164: History of World Cinema III: Queer Cinema around the World (ARTHIST 364, CSRE 102C, CSRE 302C, FEMGEN 100C, FILMEDIA 100C, FILMEDIA 300C, GLOBAL 193, GLOBAL 390, TAPS 100C, TAPS 300C)

Provides an overview of cinema from around the world since 1960, highlighting the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped various film movements over the last six decades. We study key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a formal, historical, theoretical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor. This term's topic, Queer Cinema around the World, studies the relationship of gender, sexuality, and cinematic representation trans-regionally and transnationally. Moving beyond the Euro-American focus of gender and sexuality studies and queer cinema courses, this course will foster an examination of queerness, sexual minorities, same-sex desire, LGBTQI+ rights, censorship, precarity, and hopefulness in relation to race, nationalism, religion, and region. Through film and video from Kenya, Hong Kong, India, The Dominican Republic, South Korea, Spain, Palestine, Argentina, the US (Black, indigenous cinemas, for instance), South Africa, Colombia etc., this course will engage with a range of queer cinematic forms and queer spectatorial practices in different parts of the world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ARTHIST 165: Vincent van Gogh and His World

No artist is more famous than Vincent van Gogh. Yet how well is he known? Perhaps not at all. A victim of cliches and platitudes, his art is rarely seen, or, to put it differently, the power of its call on us is mostly unheeded. What was he searching for and what did he hope to make possible for us to experience along with him? How, to put it differently, did he love us? An adventure beyond the trite and true, an exploration in the powers of naivete, offered by someone without authority, the class will take us deeply into Van Gogh's art and his moment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ARTHIST 165B: American Style and the Rhetoric of Fashion (AMSTUD 127, FILMEDIA 165B)

Focus on the visual culture of fashion, especially in an American context. Topics include: the representation of fashion in different visual media (prints, photographs, films, window displays, and digital images); the relationship of fashion to its historical context and American culture; the interplay between fashion and other modes of discourse, in particular art, but also performance, music, economics; and the use of fashion as an expression of social status, identity, and other attributes of the wearer. Texts by Thorstein Veblen, Roland Barthes, Dick Hebdige, and other theorists of fashion.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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