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1 - 10 of 16 results for: ANTHRO ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ANTHRO 1S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 10SC: Evolution, Conservation, and Education in Galápagos (HUMBIO 17SC)

The tiny remote islands of Galápagos have played a large and central role in the study of evolution. Not surprisingly, they have also become central to the study of conservation. The fascinating adaptations of organisms to the unique ecosystems of the archipelago have left them particularly vulnerable to human-induced changes underway in the islands today. But did you know that Galápagos is also an important proving ground for new approaches to environmental education, both for the people who live in the islands as well as for those who visit them?

Drawing on lessons learned in Galapagos from Darwin's time to the present, this seminar explores evolution, conservation, and education in the Galápagos Archipelago. Using case-study material on tortoises, iguanas, finches, endemic plants and more, we will explore current theory and debate about adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, adaptive radiation, and other topics in evolution. Similarly, we will explore the special challenges Ga more »
The tiny remote islands of Galápagos have played a large and central role in the study of evolution. Not surprisingly, they have also become central to the study of conservation. The fascinating adaptations of organisms to the unique ecosystems of the archipelago have left them particularly vulnerable to human-induced changes underway in the islands today. But did you know that Galápagos is also an important proving ground for new approaches to environmental education, both for the people who live in the islands as well as for those who visit them?

Drawing on lessons learned in Galapagos from Darwin's time to the present, this seminar explores evolution, conservation, and education in the Galápagos Archipelago. Using case-study material on tortoises, iguanas, finches, endemic plants and more, we will explore current theory and debate about adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, adaptive radiation, and other topics in evolution. Similarly, we will explore the special challenges Galápagos poses today for conservation, owing to both its unusual biota and the increasing impact of human activity in the archipelago. Relatedly, we will consider case studies of environmental education in the islands, involving residents as well as tourists, asking what can be done to make these efforts more effective?

This course includes, at no additional cost to students, an intensive eleven-day expedition to Galápagos to observe firsthand many of the issues and outcomes discussed in class. A chartered ship will serve as our floating classroom, dormitory, and dining hall as we work our way around the archipelago to visit as many as ten islands. For this portion of the class, undergraduates will be joined by a group of Stanford alumni and friends in a format called a Stanford "Field Seminar." Because our class time on campus is limited to one week before travel, students will be required to complete all course readings over the summer. Both on campus and in South America, the course emphasizes student contributions and presentations. Students will be asked to lead discussions and carry out literature research about the Galápagos related to key themes of the class. The final assignment for the seminar is to complete a seven- to ten-page paper on an approved topic of your choice related to one or more of the areas of evolution, conservation and education in Galapagos today, and to present the main findings of that paper in a joint seminar of undergrads and alumni as we travel in Galápagos.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 95B: Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers

Taken in the final quarter before graduation. Independent study and work on senior paper for students admitted to the program. Prerequisite: consent of program adviser and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 96: Directed Individual Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 101S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 401A: Qualifying Examination: Topic

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 401B: Qualifying Examination: Area

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeated for credit one time.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 440: Graduate Teaching

Supervised experience teaching in Anthropology
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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