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171 - 180 of 215 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 443: Networks: A Visual History

Networks are maps for thinking. They illustrate connections while shaping mental journeys, transforming our self-reflexivity along the way. In this course, we will study the metamorphoses of networks, from medieval genealogies to Renaissance cartographic systems and from modern mnemotechnic diagrams to today's visualizations of brain connectivity to ask questions about the politics of connectivity, the deceptions of graphic simplicity, and the capacity of infographics to turn into art.

ARTHIST 444: Counter-Institution: Performance and Institutional Critique (TAPS 342)

Out of 100 members of the current US Senate, only one has a college degree in arts. In the House of Representatives, the situation is even bleaker: while some ten representatives, out of 435, have experience in some kind of artistic practice (music, writing, or video design), again only one holds an art-related degree. On state level, the situation is better, but not much. Is this severe under-representation of artists among elected officials the result of their lack of interest in institutional position of the arts? How would arts policies in the US look if more elected officials had background in the arts and actual stakes in this sector? 'Counter-Institution' brings together artistic practice and policy. On the one hand, we will explore the 'institutional critique' of artists such as Andrea Fraser, Hito Steyerl, and Fred Wilson, and on the other, we will investigate government initiatives that affected the arts, from the New Deal in the 1930s to the severe defunding of the National Endowment for the Arts in the 1990s, to increasing privatization of art institutions in the first decades of the new millennium.
Last offered: Spring 2021

ARTHIST 446: Duchamp Then and Now (ARTHIST 246)

This seminar provides an opportunity to explore not only the familiar though endlessly fascinating episodes of Duchamp's career (Nude Descending a Staircase; the readymade; the Large Glass; the Boite-en-valise; the persona of Rrose Sélavy, his films and exhibition designs, for example), but also works such as Etant Donnés, which has received renewed attention in what is now an extensive recent literature on this work and on Duchamp more generally that will provide a platform for drawing connections with issues, media, critical literatures and artists of students' own choosing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 447: Russia in Color (ARTHIST 247, SLAVIC 131, SLAVIC 331)

This course explores the application, evolution, and perception of color in art, art history, literature, and popular culture - in (Soviet) Russia and emigration. Working closely with the Cantor Arts Center collection at Stanford, this course pairs artifacts art with theoretical and cultural readings (media theory, philosophy, literature, science). With a particular focus on Russian and East European objects (including those by Russian icons, Soviet posters, and prints by Wassily Kandinsky and Marc Chagall), the course will include a basic introduction to color terminology, guest lectures on the technologies color printing, the science of color perception, and a hands-on practicum in color mixing/pigmentation. In addition to direct encounters with material and artifact, our course will also seek to better understand the digital experience of art objects in general, and color in particular. No knowledge of Russian is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Reischl, K. (PI)

ARTHIST 448: The Body in Film and other Media (FILMEDIA 448)

In this seminar, we will consider the body on screen as well as the body before the screen i.e. the spectator but also the profilmic body of the actor to examine corporeal performance and reception. The dancing body, the comic body, dead and live bodies, the monstrous body, the body in pain, the virtual body all raise questions about embodiment, liveness, and performance. We will read the body in audiovisual culture through an engagement with affect theory, focusing on the labor of performance, the construction of stardom, spatial and temporal configurations of the performing body, and the production of affect and sensation in the spectating body. Through a discussion of make-up, fashion, the labor of producing the idealized star body from the meat-and-bones body of the actor, or body genres where the spectator's body is beside itself with sexual pleasure, fear and terror, or overpowering sadness, we will inquire into ideologies of discipline and desire that undergird mediatized bodies more »
In this seminar, we will consider the body on screen as well as the body before the screen i.e. the spectator but also the profilmic body of the actor to examine corporeal performance and reception. The dancing body, the comic body, dead and live bodies, the monstrous body, the body in pain, the virtual body all raise questions about embodiment, liveness, and performance. We will read the body in audiovisual culture through an engagement with affect theory, focusing on the labor of performance, the construction of stardom, spatial and temporal configurations of the performing body, and the production of affect and sensation in the spectating body. Through a discussion of make-up, fashion, the labor of producing the idealized star body from the meat-and-bones body of the actor, or body genres where the spectator's body is beside itself with sexual pleasure, fear and terror, or overpowering sadness, we will inquire into ideologies of discipline and desire that undergird mediatized bodies. nnNo prior engagement with film studies is required. Students are encouraged to write seminar papers that build on current research interests.nnNOTE: Instructor consent required for undergraduate students (only seniors may enroll). Please contact the instructor for permission to enroll if you're an undergraduate senior.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 450: Art in the Age of Precarity

Art and precarity in the age of neoliberalism. How artists and critics engage questions of immaterial labor, human capital, structural racism, environmental crisis, the anthropocene and other current issues in their work. The question of art as activism and social practice relative to such themes. Enrollment contingent upon permission of instructor; permission numbers will be provided by staff upon professor's approval.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 451: Warhol's World (ARTHIST 251)

Andy Warhol's art has never before been more widely exhibited, published, or licensed for commercial use, product design, and publication than it is today. For all Warhol's promiscuous visibility and global cachet at the current moment, there is much we have yet to learn about his work and the conditions of its making. This course considers the wide world of Warhol's art and life, including his commercial work of the 1950s, Pop art and films of the 1960s, and celebrity portraiture of the 1970s and 80s. Of particular interest throughout will be Warhol's photography as it reflects his interest in wealth and celebrity on the one hand and on the everyday life of everyday people on the other.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 453: Aesthetics and Phenomenology (ARTHIST 253, FILMEDIA 253, FILMEDIA 453)

This course explores central topics in aesthetics where aesthetics is understood both in the narrow sense of the philosophy of art and aesthetic judgment, and in a broader sense as it relates to questions of perception, sensation, and various modes of embodied experience. We will engage with both classical and contemporary works in aesthetic theory, while special emphasis will be placed on phenomenological approaches to art and aesthetic experience across a range of media and/or mediums (including painting, sculpture, film, and digital media). PhD students in the Art History program may take the class to fulfill degree requirements in Modern/Contemporary Art or Film & Media Studies, depending on the topic of their seminar paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Denson, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 456: What Was Photography? (ARTHIST 256)

Digital imaging has largely replaced darkroom work over the past quarter century, yet analog practices still dominate theories of photography. Working closely with the Capital Group Foundation Collection at the Cantor, this class will explore how those theories relate to vintage photographic prints and whether they are still relevant to the photography being produced today. Students will select one photographer within the Collection and create a set of writings that help contemporary viewers see these mid-century American artists through diverse contemporary perspectives.

ARTHIST 460: Decolonizing Theory (FILMEDIA 460)

The past year has witnessed a remarkable reckoning with systemic racism and embedded structures of inequality, underscoring once again the epistemic violence of the privileging of a white, western, heteropatriarchal intellectual tradition in the academy. This seminar mobilizes multiple approaches and orientations, including decolonial theory, the Black Radical Tradition, postcolonial theory, and transnational decolonial feminisms. We consider critiques from these traditions of the Eurocentrism of critical theory, its imbrication with western modernity, colonial capitalism, and neocolonial geopolitics. Through texts ranging across frameworks of the coloniality of gender, epistemologies of the South, critical race studies, and theories of the global, we examine ways to de-universalize, de-imperialize, decolonize, and globalize Theory. Limited to graduate students; undergraduates must contact instructor for permission (seniors only).
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