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71 - 80 of 187 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGLISH 115E: Shakespeare and his Contexts: Race, Religion, Sexuality, Gender

Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 115G: Shakespeare: Five Tragedies

Readings of five plays: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra. We will begin with a brief overview of Shakespeare's life and times and the theatrical conditions he worked within. However, our efforts will be focused primarily on direct engagement with Shakespeare's plays themselves. Sessions will include discussions of Shakespearean tragic language, reading aloud of specific scenes, and exploration of what unites and differentiates these plays. Finally, we will reflect continuously on what makes tragedy such a strange, rich and necessary form, where (as one philosopher wrote) ¿in suffering failure, the loser conquers.¿
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Jenkins, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 118: Literature and the Brain (COMPLIT 138, COMPLIT 238, ENGLISH 218, FRENCH 118, FRENCH 218, PSYC 126, PSYCH 118F)

Recent developments in and neuroscience and experimental psychology have transformed the way we think about the operations of the brain. What can we learn from this about the nature and function of literary texts? Can innovative ways of speaking affect ways of thinking? Do creative metaphors draw on embodied cognition? Can fictions strengthen our "theory of mind" capabilities? What role does mental imagery play in the appreciation of descriptions? Does (weak) modularity help explain the mechanism and purpose of self-reflexivity? Can the distinctions among types of memory shed light on what narrative works have to offer?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ENGLISH 118A: Illness in Literature

This class provides an overview of illness narratives in fiction from the 19th century to the present. We will examine how authors use language, plot, and structure to portray illness and even recreate its sensations within the reader. We will also study how domestic arrangements, art, medicine and technology mediate the experience of disease. Our discussion of fiction will be buttressed by theoretical texts about the function (and breakdown) of language when deployed to describe physical and mental suffering. Finally, we will consider the ethics of writing about illness. What does it mean to find beauty in descriptions of pain? What role can literature play in building empathy for experiences we have not (yet) experienced ourselves?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 122C: Medieval Fantasy Literature

This is a comparative medieval literature course that surveys Anglo-Norman and English romance, English and Norse heroic epic, and Norse and Celtic mythology. What significance and meaning did medieval writers from different times and places see in magic and monsters; what superstitions and beliefs converged in their efforts to represent things ¿from the other side,¿ and what compelled them to do so? We will address such questions by reading the literature against the social, cultural, and religious contexts that shaped medieval life and artistic production. Finally we will turn to the modern era with J. R. R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and Kazuo Ishiguro's The Buried Giant, reflecting on how literary medievalism has cultivated the tropes of medieval fantasy to produce works which mediate between an imagined history, sublime fabrication, and contemporary concerns.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ashton, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 124: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ENGLISH 124A: Latinx Literature (CHILATST 124A, CSRE 124A)

Emerging from the demographic, political, and cultural shifts of the late twentiethnncentury, LatinX Literature flourishes in the twenty-first century as a hemisphericallynnAmerican corpus of texts. Like both ChicanX and Puerto Rican literatures before it,nnLatinX Literature emerges from various movements for social justice to challengennboth the Anglo and the Hispanic established literary traditions of the Americas. As anntransnational, pluralistic, heterogeneous, and dynamic category that considers thennwritings of diverse peoples with cultural ties to Latin America residing in the U.S., itnncomplicates and transgresses the linguistic, geopolitical and cultural borders ofnnthe Americas, including those of the Afro-Caribbean, Luso-Brazilian, and the NativennFirst Nations. Aligning itself with the issues, styles, and topics of the Global South,nnLatinX Literature is a product of the kind of ¿border thinking¿ that critic WalternnMignolo has described as a ¿pluriversal . . . epistemology more »
Emerging from the demographic, political, and cultural shifts of the late twentiethnncentury, LatinX Literature flourishes in the twenty-first century as a hemisphericallynnAmerican corpus of texts. Like both ChicanX and Puerto Rican literatures before it,nnLatinX Literature emerges from various movements for social justice to challengennboth the Anglo and the Hispanic established literary traditions of the Americas. As anntransnational, pluralistic, heterogeneous, and dynamic category that considers thennwritings of diverse peoples with cultural ties to Latin America residing in the U.S., itnncomplicates and transgresses the linguistic, geopolitical and cultural borders ofnnthe Americas, including those of the Afro-Caribbean, Luso-Brazilian, and the NativennFirst Nations. Aligning itself with the issues, styles, and topics of the Global South,nnLatinX Literature is a product of the kind of ¿border thinking¿ that critic WalternnMignolo has described as a ¿pluriversal . . . epistemology that interconnects thennplurality and diversity of decolonial projects.¿ Acknowledging its emergence fromnnliteral and theoretical border spaces and decolonizing epistemologies, the ¿X¿ ofnnLatinX intentionally inflects the link to an origin in LGBTQI discourses signifying ¿annmore inclusive, non-gender-binary designation for LatinX peoples¿ and as a bordernnliterature that articulates heterogeneous ways of making meaning¿. Authors maynninclude Jesus Colón, Sandra Cisneros, Helena Maria Viramontes, Christina Garcia,nnJunot Diaz, Ire´ne Lara Silva, Julia Alvarez, Américo Paredes, Daniel Alarcón,nnFrancisco Goldman, Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Tato Laviera, ErnestonnQuinonez, Erika Sanchez, Elizabeth Acevedo, Luis Valdez, Lorna Dee Cervantes,nnSilvia Moreno-Garcia, Fernando Flores, or Oscar Cásares.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ENGLISH 124C: Cultures of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands (AMSTUD 124, CHILATST 124C)

Cultures of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Since becoming president, Donald Trump has deported more than a million migrants and started building a multi-billion-dollar border wall. Although some of Trump¿s actions have seemed anomalous, they have all relied on and reaffirmed longstanding legacies of settler colonialism and racial capitalism. In this seminar, we will look at these legacies through the eyes of the Natives, Latinxs, whites, and others who have lived in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Within the confines of literature, we will read novelists like Willa Cather, essayists like Valeria Luiselli, and poets like Simon Ortiz (Acoma Pueblo). Meanwhile, across the more capacious category of culture, we will engage with promoters who encouraged whites to claim homesteads, periodistas who emboldened Latinxs to protect pueblos, and leaders who helped Natives fight for sovereignty. By blending literary studies and ethnic studies, we will gain a thorough grasp of the territories that have t more »
Cultures of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Since becoming president, Donald Trump has deported more than a million migrants and started building a multi-billion-dollar border wall. Although some of Trump¿s actions have seemed anomalous, they have all relied on and reaffirmed longstanding legacies of settler colonialism and racial capitalism. In this seminar, we will look at these legacies through the eyes of the Natives, Latinxs, whites, and others who have lived in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Within the confines of literature, we will read novelists like Willa Cather, essayists like Valeria Luiselli, and poets like Simon Ortiz (Acoma Pueblo). Meanwhile, across the more capacious category of culture, we will engage with promoters who encouraged whites to claim homesteads, periodistas who emboldened Latinxs to protect pueblos, and leaders who helped Natives fight for sovereignty. By blending literary studies and ethnic studies, we will gain a thorough grasp of the territories that have taken shape since the U.S.-Mexico War (1846¿48), especially the ones that we currently call Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. From these concrete contexts, we will ask and answer more abstract questions: What are borders¿are they physical boundaries, or are they psychosocial conditions? Similarly, what are nations¿are they stable and homogeneous groups, or are they flexible and diverse communities? Ultimately, what are human beings¿can they be branded as illegal aliens, or do they have inalienable rights? During the quarter, we will work through these questions both collectively and individually: to enrich our in-class discussions, each five-unit student will complete a four- to five-page reading of a single source, a six- to eight-page paper on several sources, and a multimedia borderlands map.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Nugent, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 129A: Body Text (FEMGEN 129A)

Written on the body is a secret code only visible in certain lights; the accumulations of a lifetime gather there. In places the palimpsest is so heavily worked that the letters feel like braille. I like to keep my body rolled up away from prying eyes. Never unfold too much, tell the whole story. Jeanette Winterson, Written on the BodynThis course asks when and where flesh becomes text. Through an eclectic mix of short stories, novels, film, nonfiction, and critical theory, we will think through how text becomes a metaphor for, substitute for, and/or extension of the body. What exactly do we talk about when we talk about The Body How are bodies written into and out of existence? Topics will include the virtual body, the eating-disordered body, the choreographed body, the medicalized trans body, and the black body in the carceral state. Throughout the course, we will draw out the theoretical in the literary and the literary in the theoretical, and will pay special attention to the relationship between embodied practice and (traditionally) disembodied thought.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 135: What is all this juice and all this joy? Great Victorian Poetry

In this course we will study the works of major Victorian poets across various genres, including: Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, Meredith, Rossetti, Arnold, Barrett Browning and Swinburne.nThis course would work well alongside Great Victorian Novels.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Owens, T. (PI)
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