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21 - 30 of 67 results for: JAPAN

JAPAN 163: Japanese Performance Traditions (JAPAN 263)

Major paradigms of gender in Japanese performance traditions from ancient to modern times, covering Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Takarazuka.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

JAPAN 163A: Beauty and Renunciation in Japan (HUMCORE 123)

Is it okay to feel pleasure? Should humans choose beauty or renunciation? This is the main controversy of medieval Japan. This course introduces students to the famous literary works that created a world of taste, subtlety, and sensuality. We also read essays that warn against the risks of leading a life of gratification, both in this life and in the afterlife. And we discover together the ways in which these two positions can be not that far from each other. Does love always lead to heartbreak? Is the appreciation of nature compatible with the truths of Buddhism? Is it good to have a family? What kind of house should we build for ourselves? Can fictional stories make us better persons? Each week, during the first class meeting, we will focus on these issues in Japan. During the second class meeting, we will participate in a collaborative conversation with the other students and faculty in Humanities Core classes, about other regions and issues. This course is taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

JAPAN 164: Introduction to Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 264)

Readings from Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and early Edo periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

JAPAN 165: Readings in Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 265)

Edo and Meiji periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 170: The Tale of Genji and Its Historical Reception (JAPAN 270)

Approaches to the tale including 12th-century allegorical and modern feminist readings. Influence upon other works including poetry, Noh plays, short stories, modern novels, and comic book ( manga) retellings. Prerequisite for graduate students: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.nnThis course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 188: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (ARTHIST 287A, JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

JAPAN 189B: Honors Research

Open to senior honors students to write thesis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

JAPAN 192: Analyzing Japanese Text and Talk (JAPAN 292)

Are there reasons why certain words, phrases, sentences and prosody are chosen by language speakers and writers in specific contexts? What linguistic and extra-linguistic elements give the hearers and readers the impression that certain utterances and passages are friendly, accusatory, officious, humorous, personal, formal, colloquial, etc.? This seminar provides an introduction to different theoretical and analytical approaches to studying language use in context (e.g. pragmatics, sociolinguistics, usage-based grammar, conversational analysis, critical discourse analysis) and an opportunity to critically analyze text and talk. Using the analytical tools acquired through readings and discussions, students will be able to analyze Japanese materials of their selection. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with interests either (or both) in Japanese linguistics and literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4

JAPAN 193: Acquisition of Japanese as a Second Language (JAPAN 293)

This course provides students with a broad overview of second language acquisition (SLA) research and introduces recent SLA studies on Japanese as a second language (L2). It covers six topics: (1) the evolution of the field, (2) approaches to understanding learner language, (3) current state of knowledge of L2 developmental patterns, (4) theories of L2 learning, (5) factors that affect SLA, and (6) instructed SLA. By reading and discussing exemplary SLA studies on L2 Japanese as well as seminal papers on these topics, students will develop abilities to analyze learner language from multiple perspectives, critically read research reports, and consider implications for L2 teaching.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

JAPAN 197: Points in Japanese Grammar (JAPAN 297)

(Formerly JAPANLIT157/257) The course provides practical but in-depth analyses of selected points in Japanese grammar that are often difficult to acquire within the limited hours of language courses. We consider findings from linguistic research, focusing on differences between similar expressions and distinctions that may not be salient in English, with the aim to provide systematic analytical background for more advanced understanding of the language. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG23 or equivalent for JAPAN197; JAPANLNG103 or equivalent for JAPAN297.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)
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