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1 - 10 of 12 results for: URBANST

URBANST 27Q: The Detective and the City

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1890s, San Francisco and Los Angeles in the 1920s and 30s, and Shanghai in the 1990s) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring four great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade, Roman Polanski's Jake Gittes, and Qiu Xiaolong's Chief Inspector Chen). nnAs a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime - or perhaps just a fascination with crime -- is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives, another literary detective of your own choosing, or on one of today's related manifestations of the same impulse in popular visual culture featuring superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 83N: City, Space, Literature (ENGLISH 83N)

This course presents a literary tour of various cities as a way of thinking about space, representation, and the urban. Using literature and film, the course will explore these from a variety of perspectives. The focus will be thematic rather than chronological, but an attempt will also be made to trace the different ways in which cities have been represented from the late nineteenth century to recent times. Ideas of space, cosmopolitanism, and the urban will be explored through films such as The Bourne Identity and The Lunchbox, as well as in the writings of Arthur Conan Doyle, Walter Mosley, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Karen Tei Yamashita, and Mohsin Hamid, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Quayson, A. (PI)

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. A majority of the world's population now live in urban areas and most of the rapid urbanization has taken place in mega-cities outside the Western world. This course explores urban cultures, identities, spatial practices and forms of urban power and imagination in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Participants will be introduced to a global history of urban development that demonstrates how the legacies of colonialism, modernization theory and global race thinking have shaped urban designs and urban life in most of the world. Students will also be introduced to interpretative and qualitative approaches to urban life that affords an understanding of important, if unquantifiable, vectors of urban life: stereotypes, fear, identity formations, utopia, social segregation and aspirations. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)

URBANST 127A: Community Organizing: People, Power & Change

Organizers ask three questions: who are my people, what challenges do they face, and how can they turn their resources into the power they need to meet these challenges? Organizing requires leadership: accepting responsibility for enabling others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty. Organizers identify, recruit, and develop leadership; build community around that leadership; and build power from the resources of that community. In these fellowship modules, students will build their coaching and leadership skills to support other students in the craft of community organizing. Across the first two modules, students will be introduced to the five core leadership practices: public narrative, building relationships, structure, strategy, and action. In the first module, students will learn what coaching is and how to coach one another through leadership challenges. We will then focus on public narrative in the context of organizing. Students will learn to tell their own publ more »
Organizers ask three questions: who are my people, what challenges do they face, and how can they turn their resources into the power they need to meet these challenges? Organizing requires leadership: accepting responsibility for enabling others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty. Organizers identify, recruit, and develop leadership; build community around that leadership; and build power from the resources of that community. In these fellowship modules, students will build their coaching and leadership skills to support other students in the craft of community organizing. Across the first two modules, students will be introduced to the five core leadership practices: public narrative, building relationships, structure, strategy, and action. In the first module, students will learn what coaching is and how to coach one another through leadership challenges. We will then focus on public narrative in the context of organizing. Students will learn to tell their own public narrative, coach one another on their public narratives, and learn how to use public narrative to analyze responses to leadership challenges. Students will receive the opportunity to coach other students at a public narrative workshop towards the end of module 1. Module 2 will build off of the knowledge and skills students gain in module 1 by diving into the remaining for leadership practices: relationships, structure, strategy, and action. Students will apply the organizing principles by viewing the fellowship experience as a campaign - who is our constituency? What is our strategic goal? How will we reach it? Students will leave the retreat with a draft of our collective strategic plan. In the remaining three sessions, students will take the lead in facilitating and practicing the activities and skills modeled during the retreat in preparation for coaching at the Winter Intensive.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Engage with founders of leading social enterprises, including the "guru of green business" per the Associated Press, a "Most Innovative AI Innovation" recipient per Fast Company, a "35 Inventors under 35" Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) winner, and a Sustainability Hall of Fame inductee. ¿Guest social entrepreneurs will feature Diego Saez Gil of Pachama, Hannah Sieber of Artyc, and Sami Inkinen of Virta Health. The weekly line-up of accomplished founders also includes Joel Makower of GreenBiz and Troy Carter and Patrick Leung of Earthshot Labs. Students will be exposed to the perspectives and endeavors of global high-impact entrepreneurs who address social and environmental needs in the U.S. and internationally through for-profit, nonprofit and hybrid models. Each week students will have the opportunity to converse with guest social entrepreneurs. This class will expose students to pioneering thought leaders, diverse impact career paths, networking and potential internship and job opportunities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Edwards, M. (PI)

URBANST 155A: Environmental Justice Colloquium (EARTHSYS 194A, HUMRTS 194A)

This colloquium brings the voices and vision of leading Environmental Justice (EJ) advocates to the Stanford community, in order to educate, inspire, and transform our understanding of environmental science. Environmental Justice advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism. EJ approaches involve centering the voices and leadership of marginalized communities in 1) ensuring equitable access to environmental benefits, and 2) preventing or mitigating the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities, regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity, or other social positions. This colloquium highlights the work of leading EJ thinkers and practitioners, speaking from frontline organizations on a wide range of topics. These topics include acting on toxic exposures and health disparities for community resilience, climate justice and youth action, Indigenous land and water rights, green cities and Afrofuturism, food justice and intersecting social movements, queer ecologies, and more. The colloquium will host a weekly speaker with course meetings held every Wednesday. Colloquium presentations will begin promptly at 12pm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

URBANST 190A: Public Service and Social Impact: Pathways to Purposeful Careers (CSRE 190A, ENGLISH 180, INTNLREL 74, POLISCI 74B, PUBLPOL 75B, SOC 190A, SYMSYS 193)

How do I translate my interests and skills into a career in public service and social impact? This course will introduce you to a wide range of roles that help shape public policy and civic life, including government, education, nonprofits, social enterprises, and arts/media. It can be taken for one or two units. For one unit, you participate in a weekly, interactive speaker series designed to give you a sense for what different public service careers are like. Each week, guests describe their organizations and roles, highlight key intellectual issues and policy challenges, discuss their career paths, and describe skills crucial for the job. For a second unit, you participate in a hands-on weekly session designed to help you translate this knowledge into action. You will identify roles and organizations that might be a good match for you, build your network through informational interviewing, receive career coaching, and acquire the tools you need to launch your job or internship searc more »
How do I translate my interests and skills into a career in public service and social impact? This course will introduce you to a wide range of roles that help shape public policy and civic life, including government, education, nonprofits, social enterprises, and arts/media. It can be taken for one or two units. For one unit, you participate in a weekly, interactive speaker series designed to give you a sense for what different public service careers are like. Each week, guests describe their organizations and roles, highlight key intellectual issues and policy challenges, discuss their career paths, and describe skills crucial for the job. For a second unit, you participate in a hands-on weekly session designed to help you translate this knowledge into action. You will identify roles and organizations that might be a good match for you, build your network through informational interviewing, receive career coaching, and acquire the tools you need to launch your job or internship search. This course is intended for all students and all majors. Course content will be relevant to students soon entering the job market as well as those facing choices about courses of study and internships. Class sessions will be 60 minutes. This course is co-sponsored by the Haas Center for Public Service, the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Stanford in Government. Students taking the course for one unit (Tuesday lecture) must enroll in the -01 course option, and students taking the course for two units (Tuesday lecture and Thursday seminar) must enroll in the -02 course option. Enrollment in the -02 course option requires a brief application and instructor consent. Please copy and paste the following link to apply: https://forms.gle/Jy3yKKDGxHhThSpeA .If you have any questions, please email lalitvak@stanford.edu. IR approved.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

URBANST 194: Internship in Urban Studies

For Urban Studies majors only. Students organize an internship in an office of a government agency, a community organization, or a private firm directly relevant to the major. Reading supplements internship. Paper summarizes internship experience and related readings.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 195: Special Projects in Urban Studies

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 197: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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