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1 - 10 of 14 results for: SUSTAIN

SUSTAIN 1A: Know Your Planet: Research Frontiers

Discover the challenges that face our planet today and the people working on solving those problems now. Planet Earth is our only home and so it is critical that we understand what is driving global change. In this course, we focus on climate and sustainability. You¿ll get an introduction to the cutting edge research of Stanford faculty, who are leading the effort to ask and answer these critical questions about our planet. Open to all students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Yau, A. (PI)

SUSTAIN 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)

SUSTAIN 103: Human and Planetary Health (BIO 103, BIO 203, MED 103, SOC 103)

Two of the biggest challenges humanity has to face - promoting human health and halting environmental degradation - are strongly linked. The emerging field of Planetary Health recognizes these inter-linkages and promotes creative, interdisciplinary solutions that protect human health and the health of the ecosystems on which we depend. Through a series of lectures and case-study discussions, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the 'Planetary Health' concept, its foundation, goals, priority areas of action, methods of investigation, and the most relevant immediate challenges.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

SUSTAIN 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (BIO 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Wrigley Field Program in Hawaii.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

SUSTAIN 118: Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii (CSRE 118E, NATIVEAM 118)

This course explores the cultural, political economic, and environmental status of contemporary Hawaiians. What sorts of sustainable economic and environmental systems did Hawaiians use in prehistory? How was colonization of the Hawaiian Islands informed and shaped by American economic interests and the nascent imperialism of the early 20th century? How was sovereignty and Native Hawaiian identity been shaped by these forces? How has tourism and the leisure industry affected the natural environment? This course uses archaeological methods, ethnohistorical sources, and historical analysis in an exploration of contemporary Hawaiian social economic and political life. Restricted to students accepted into the Wrigley Field Program in Hawaii.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

SUSTAIN 140: Environmental Humanities: Finding Our Place on a Changing Planet (BIO 184, ENGLISH 140D)

The rapid degradation of our planet threatens the health and survival of communities and ecosystems around the world. How did we get here? What cultural, philosophical, and ethical challenges underlie the separation of humanity from nature and precipitate unprecedented ecological destruction? How can we make sense of this, and how can we reimagine a more connected future? Through engaging the work of environmental philosophers, cultural ecologists, artists, humanities scholars, Indigenous leaders, and others with land-based knowledge, this course will prompt you to think deeply about humanity's place in the world and explore strategies to change our course. Together, we will explore contrasting cultural paradigms around human-nature relationships and apply learnings to action - including through final projects that involve external audiences in meaningful environmental contemplation or impact.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

SUSTAIN 200P: Your Professional Development Practicum

Developing a strong portfolio of skills and tools takes resources and partners. This practicum enables the freedom to explore and develop a specific component of your professional portfolio with instructor support. You will set a professional development goal at the start of the quarter and then build a self-directed set of experiences that engage on-campus resources, professional society opportunities, and/or external partners to explore and develop new skills. Completion will include reflection on the experience, feedback from peers and mentors, and a concrete product that expands your professional toolkit. This practicum is recommended for latter stage graduate students, or following completion of SUSTAIN 200A.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Yau, A. (PI)

SUSTAIN 210: Justice 40 Policy Lab

The Executive Order for Tackling the Climate Crisis (14008) establishes a procedural policy, Justice 40, that applies principles of recognition and distributive equity to hundreds of federal policies and programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implementation of the policy requires applicants produce a community benefit plan with four major components: assessment of job impacts; environmental impacts, including greenhouse gas emissions; assessment of the fraction of benefits reaching disadvantaged communities; and level of community participation along with advancement of diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility. Participants in the lab will produce prototypes that can be adapted at multiple levels of jurisdiction. First class meeting in AY22-23 will be Tuesday of Week 2. Enrollment limited; preference given to graduate students. Undergraduates should contact instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Hummel, H. (PI)

SUSTAIN 324: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 7071), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

SUSTAIN 328: Policy Practicum: Integrating Water and Land Use Policy in the West: The Missing Link

The western United States is currently experiencing what may be the longest and most severe "megadrought" in modern U.S. history. Current U.S. drought data shows virtually all of the Southwest in severe, extreme, or extraordinary drought. Reservoirs on the Colorado River are reaching record lows, and many farmers throughout the West have had their deliveries cut dramatically or face potentially massive cutbacks. Media discussion of episodic, emergency "droughts" has been replaced by a recognition of the permanent "aridification" of the West under climate change. Resolving the West's growing water crisis will require far greater linkage of water management and land use. Land use drives water demand, while water availability constrains land use. While water and land use are integrally related in fact, water and land-use policies in practice are far from integrated. Developments are approved without reference to water availability, and water agencies often have to scramble to find and fun more »
The western United States is currently experiencing what may be the longest and most severe "megadrought" in modern U.S. history. Current U.S. drought data shows virtually all of the Southwest in severe, extreme, or extraordinary drought. Reservoirs on the Colorado River are reaching record lows, and many farmers throughout the West have had their deliveries cut dramatically or face potentially massive cutbacks. Media discussion of episodic, emergency "droughts" has been replaced by a recognition of the permanent "aridification" of the West under climate change. Resolving the West's growing water crisis will require far greater linkage of water management and land use. Land use drives water demand, while water availability constrains land use. While water and land use are integrally related in fact, water and land-use policies in practice are far from integrated. Developments are approved without reference to water availability, and water agencies often have to scramble to find and fund new projects to augment or conserve water. New land developments or more intensive farming can lead to increased groundwater pumping that can cause neighboring residents' wells to run dry. In other cases, a failure to link water and land use can lead to abrupt building bans and/or emergency rationing. To meet the needs of a more water constrained future under climate change, a more integrated approach to water management and land use is warranted. While John Wesley Powell once recommended close integration of water and land use, western states have historically ignored the imperative. In the past decade or so, some states have ventured more fully into the connection between land use and water. Some states, for example, have enacted "Show Me the Water" statutes that require land developments above a certain size to demonstrate that they have 50 to 100 years' worth of water available before permits can be issued. In other places, states require land use authorities to consider water issues in developing their plans (or issuing well permits), either though consulting with their overlapping water agencies, or through developing a water "element" to their plans. This sensible approach is far from universal. We know very little, however, about how well these various approaches have worked. Working with the Babbitt Center for Land and Water at the Lincoln Land Institute (the leader in this field) and other experts in the West, students will review and assess whether the policies that have been enacted have made a difference in practice and will develop recommendations for how water and land use can be better integrated going forward. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Thompson, B. (PI)
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