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1 - 10 of 29 results for: PSYC

PSYC 52N: The Neuroscience of Stress and Reward: Circuit Fundamentals of Emotional Arousal

How do our brains translate thoughts and experiences into feelings of pain or pleasure? Why do some people struggle more than others with social isolation, addictive habits, poor quality sleep, unexpected life challenges, or societal pressures? More importantly, what can we do about it? This course provides an introduction to studies from psychology, neurobiology, and psychiatry that explain fundamentals of emotions & behavior. We will focus on the underlying neural basis of mental health conditions like anxiety, insomnia, and addiction, while also covering the science of resilience. Students will learn foundational concepts that build knowledge in core areas of neuroscience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Giardino, W. (PI)

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 55N: Secrecy

What is a secret and why do we keep them? What is the cost - and the burden - of secret-keeping? The focus of this seminar will be professional secrecy, as we explore corporate confidentiality and the secret-keeping expected of all of us as professionals, and those who are engaged in issues of national security. Secrecy will be discussed in both ethical and practical frameworks. We will also explore psychology of secrecy, and secret-keeping in relationships. Students will begin to develop a personal ethic related to secrecy and will grapple with the intersection of secrets, lies and obfuscation.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Jacobs, J. (PI)

PSYC 83: Addictions in our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior

Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, cre more »
Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, creating an additional urgent need to discuss the implications this burgeoning problem. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction, and increase the student¿s ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYC 121: Current Topics in Machine Learning for Neuroimaging

The discovery of biological markers in medical applications is a fast-growing field. For this purpose, different experimental and neuroscientific procedures are incorporated to detect biological signatures and improve diagnosis or treatment of complex brain disorders. Neuroimaging is a discipline that studies the structure and function of the nervous system by means of imaging technology. In the recent years, machine and deep learning methods have revolutionized neuroimaging studies by enabling the development of imaging signatures of brain function and structure which can be detected at an individual level, and hence aid in developing personalized treatments. In this course, we explore the methodological gaps in analyzing high-dimensional, longitudinal, and heterogeneous clinical imaging and neuroscientific data and study novel, robust, scalable, and interpretable machine learning models for this purpose.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

PSYC 124: Brain Plasticity

Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's remarkable ability to modify its own structure and function. The brain does so in response to changes in the body or in the external environment, adjusting parameters from molecules to neurons. In this course, we will cover the overarching principles of brain plasticity: how the brain comes to mirror the details of the outside world, how it adjusts itself based on sensory deficits, how new sensory capacities can be added, how circuitry is modified by activities and goals, why it's harder to teach an old dog new tricks, how we remember, and disorders of plasticity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Rasgon, N. (PI)

PSYC 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adeli, E. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Awaad, R. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Chetty, S. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; Cosgrove, V. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Eagleman, D. (PI) ; Eshel, N. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Fung, L. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Giardino, W. (PI) ; Gibson, E. (PI) ; Goldstein-Piekarski, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Green, T. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hosseini, H. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kaysen, D. (PI) ; Keller, C. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; Kim, J. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; Mason, D. (PI) ; McCaslin-Rodrigo, S. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; McGovern, M. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ordaz, S. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Padula, C. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Pohl, K. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Sadeh Sharvit, S. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Saggar, M. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Shinozaki, G. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Stice, E. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; White-Huber, B. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (SI) ; Hardan, A. (SI) ; Lock, J. (SI) ; Manber, R. (SI) ; Singh, M. (SI) ; Tarshis, T. (SI) ; Taylor, C. (SI)

PSYC 211: Developmental Psychopathology, Psychotherapy and Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience

Common syndromes in child psychiatry. Topics include diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, course, outcome and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: familiarity with the basics of psychiatric and psychological discourse; psychiatry clerkship or course in psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

PSYC 221: Current Topics in Machine Learning for Neuroimaging

The discovery of biological markers in medical applications is a fast-growing field. For this purpose, different experimental and neuroscientific procedures are incorporated to detect biological signatures and improve diagnosis or treatment of complex brain disorders. Neuroimaging is a discipline that studies the structure and function of the nervous system by means of imaging technology. In the recent years, machine and deep learning methods have revolutionized neuroimaging studies by enabling the development of imaging signatures of brain function and structure which can be detected at an individual level, and hence aid in developing personalized treatments. In this course, we explore the methodological gaps in analyzing high-dimensional, longitudinal, and heterogeneous clinical imaging and neuroscientific data and study novel, robust, scalable, and interpretable machine learning models for this purpose.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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