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1 - 10 of 82 results for: MED

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MED 124: Global Child Health (HUMBIO 124C, PEDS 124)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 124C. Med/Graduate students must enroll in MED 124 or PEDS 124.) This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Optional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit community engaged learning component. Please view the course syllabus for more information. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or equivalent or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

MED 131: Exploring Israel's Innovation and Entrepreneurship Ecosystem for Sustaining Human & Planetary Health

Israel's innovation ecosystem is one of the most admired in the world. Israel is a leader in health, environmental, and ecological innovation, and despite its small size, Israel is home to a disproportionate number of successful start-ups. Israel combines history, culture, politics, and religion in unparalleled ways that influence not only the human and planetary health innovation ecosystem, but all aspects of life. Students in this course will (1) develop an understanding of how socio-cultural conditions, including political, regulatory, military, and academic institutions; geographical, historical, environmental, and technological conditions; and human cultures and activities have shaped the innovation ecosystem in human and planetary health in Israel into one of the world's most productive centers; (2) gain an appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages faced by entrepreneurs in Israel, how they have evolved, and how they compare to the experience of entrepreneurs in the US and more »
Israel's innovation ecosystem is one of the most admired in the world. Israel is a leader in health, environmental, and ecological innovation, and despite its small size, Israel is home to a disproportionate number of successful start-ups. Israel combines history, culture, politics, and religion in unparalleled ways that influence not only the human and planetary health innovation ecosystem, but all aspects of life. Students in this course will (1) develop an understanding of how socio-cultural conditions, including political, regulatory, military, and academic institutions; geographical, historical, environmental, and technological conditions; and human cultures and activities have shaped the innovation ecosystem in human and planetary health in Israel into one of the world's most productive centers; (2) gain an appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages faced by entrepreneurs in Israel, how they have evolved, and how they compare to the experience of entrepreneurs in the US and elsewhere; and (3) develop a strategy for delving more deeply into these themes in Israel. Note, this course will meet a total of four times during spring term. REGISTRATION is limited to undergraduate students participating in the Bing Overseas Study Program in Israel, Summer 2022. Prerequisites: This course is limited in enrollment to undergraduate students who will be participating in the Summer 2022 Bing Overseas Study Program (BOSP) Seminar in Israel, Exploring Israel's Innovation Ecosystem in Human and Planetary Health: Can A startup Culture and Technology Change the World?
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. For questions related to the course or volunteering, please email arborclinic@stanford.edu and/or pacific@ med.stanford.edu. Application only; must be an accepted CFC volunteer
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Advani, R. (PI) ; Ahmed, A. (PI) ; Ahuja, N. (PI) ; Akatsu, H. (PI) ; Al-Ahmad, A. (PI) ; Alizadeh, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Anand, S. (PI) ; Andrews, J. (PI) ; Annes, J. (PI) ; Arai, S. (PI) ; Artandi, M. (PI) ; Artandi, S. (PI) ; Asch, S. (PI) ; Ashley, E. (PI) ; Assimes, T. (PI) ; Ayoub, W. (PI) ; Baiocchi, M. (PI) ; Banerjee, S. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Basaviah, P. (PI) ; Basina, M. (PI) ; Basu, S. (PI) ; Behal, R. (PI) ; Bendavid, E. (PI) ; Benjamin, J. (PI) ; Berube, C. (PI) ; Bhalla, V. (PI) ; Bhatt, A. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blackburn, B. (PI) ; Blaschke, T. (PI) ; Blayney, D. (PI) ; Blish, C. (PI) ; Bloom, G. (PI) ; Bollyky, P. (PI) ; Bouvier, D. (PI) ; Boxer, L. (PI) ; Braddock, C. (PI) ; Brinton, T. (PI) ; Brown, W. (PI) ; Bulow, K. (PI) ; Carlson, R. (PI) ; Cartwright, C. (PI) ; Chan, D. (PI) ; Chan, G. (PI) ; Chang, C. (PI) ; Chang, S. (PI) ; Chaudhuri, O. (PI) ; Chen, A. (PI) ; Chertow, G. (PI) ; Cheung, R. (PI) ; Chi, J. (PI) ; Cho-Phan, C. (PI) ; Chu, G. (PI) ; Chua, K. (PI) ; Chung, L. (PI) ; Clarke, M. (PI) ; Clusin, W. (PI) ; Colevas, A. (PI) ; Colloff, E. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cooke, J. (PI) ; Cooper, A. (PI) ; Coutre, S. (PI) ; Crapo, L. (PI) ; Crump, C. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Das, A. (PI) ; Dash, R. (PI) ; Daugherty, T. (PI) ; David, S. (PI) ; Dawson, L. (PI) ; Deresinski, S. (PI) ; Desai, M. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dhillon, G. (PI) ; Dorman, J. (PI) ; Dosiou, C. (PI) ; Downing, N. (PI) ; DuBose, A. (PI) ; Edwards, L. (PI) ; Einav, S. (PI) ; Fantl, W. (PI) ; Fathman, C. (PI) ; Fearon, W. (PI) ; Feldman, D. (PI) ; Felsher, D. (PI) ; Fisher, G. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, P. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Ford, P. (PI) ; Fowler, M. (PI) ; Frank, M. (PI) ; Frayne, S. (PI) ; Friedland, S. (PI) ; Fries, J. (PI) ; Froelicher, V. (PI) ; Gabiola, J. (PI) ; Ganjoo, K. (PI) ; Garcia, G. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gardner, P. (PI) ; Gavi, B. (PI) ; Geng, L. (PI) ; Genovese, M. (PI) ; Gerson, L. (PI) ; Gesundheit, N. (PI) ; Glaseroff, A. (PI) ; Glenn, J. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI) ; Goldstein, M. (PI) ; Goodman, S. (PI) ; Goronzy, J. (PI) ; Gotlib, J. (PI) ; Gray, G. (PI) ; Greenberg, H. (PI) ; Greenberg, P. (PI) ; Gregory, P. (PI) ; Habtezion, A. (PI) ; Hallenbeck, J. (PI) ; Harman, S. (PI) ; Harrington, R. (PI) ; Harshman, L. (PI) ; Haskell, W. (PI) ; Heaney, C. (PI) ; Heidenreich, P. (PI) ; Henri, H. (PI) ; Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI) ; Ho, D. (PI) ; Hoffman, A. (PI) ; Holman, H. (PI) ; Holodniy, M. (PI) ; Hopkins, J. (PI) ; Horning, S. (PI) ; Hsia, H. (PI) ; Hunt, S. (PI) ; Ioannidis, J. (PI) ; Isom, R. (PI) ; Jernick, J. (PI) ; Ji, H. (PI) ; Johnston, L. (PI) ; Jones, E. (PI) ; Kahn, J. (PI) ; Kao, P. (PI) ; Kastelein, M. (PI) ; Katz, R. (PI) ; Katzenstein, D. (PI) ; Kenny, K. (PI) ; Khatri, P. (PI) ; Khazeni, N. (PI) ; Khush, K. (PI) ; Killen, J. (PI) ; Kim, S. (PI) ; King, A. (PI) ; Kohrt, H. (PI) ; Kraemer, F. (PI) ; Krishnan, E. (PI) ; Kummar, S. (PI) ; Kunz, P. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kurian, A. (PI) ; Kurtz, D. (PI) ; Kuschner, W. (PI) ; Ladabaum, U. (PI) ; Lafayette, R. (PI) ; Laport, G. (PI) ; Laws, A. (PI) ; Lee, D. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Lee, P. (PI) ; Leung, L. (PI) ; Levin, E. (PI) ; Levitt, L. (PI) ; Levy, R. (PI) ; Levy, S. (PI) ; Liang, D. (PI) ; Liedtke, M. (PI) ; Lin, B. (PI) ; Lindsay, A. (PI) ; Lorenz, K. (PI) ; Lorig, K. (PI) ; Lotfi, J. (PI) ; Lowe, A. (PI) ; Lowsky, R. (PI) ; Luby, S. (PI) ; Lunn, M. (PI) ; Lutchman, G. (PI) ; Majeti, R. (PI) ; McConnell, M. (PI) ; McLaughlin, T. (PI) ; Medeiros, B. (PI) ; Meyer, T. (PI) ; Miklos, D. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Milstein, A. (PI) ; Mitchell, B. (PI) ; Mohabir, P. (PI) ; Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI) ; Musen, M. (PI) ; Narayan, S. (PI) ; Neal, J. (PI) ; Negrin, R. (PI) ; Nevins, A. (PI) ; Nguyen, L. (PI) ; Nguyen, M. (PI) ; Nguyen, P. (PI) ; Nicolls, M. (PI) ; O' Callahan, P. (PI) ; Obedin-Maliver, J. (PI) ; Okafor, P. (PI) ; Osterberg, L. (PI) ; Owens, D. (PI) ; Palaniappan, L. (PI) ; Pao, A. (PI) ; Parnes, J. (PI) ; Parsonnet, J. (PI) ; Pasricha, P. (PI) ; Pegram, M. (PI) ; Periyakoil, V. (PI) ; Petersen, J. (PI) ; Phadke, A. (PI) ; Pinto, H. (PI) ; Pompei, P. (PI) ; Popp, R. (PI) ; Posley, K. (PI) ; Price, E. (PI) ; Prochaska, J. (PI) ; Puri, R. (PI) ; Quertermous, T. (PI) ; Raffin, T. (PI) ; Rehkopf, D. (PI) ; Relman, D. (PI) ; Rizk, N. (PI) ; Robinson, B. (PI) ; Rockson, S. (PI) ; Rodriguez, F. (PI) ; Rohatgi, R. (PI) ; Rosas, L. (PI) ; Rosen, G. (PI) ; Rosenberg, S. (PI) ; Rudd, P. (PI) ; Ruoss, S. (PI) ; Rydel, T. (PI) ; Scandling, J. (PI) ; Schnittger, I. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Schroeder, J. (PI) ; Shafer, R. (PI) ; Shah, J. (PI) ; Shah, N. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Sharp, C. (PI) ; Shen, K. (PI) ; Shieh, L. (PI) ; Shizuru, J. (PI) ; Shoor, S. (PI) ; Sikic, B. (PI) ; Singer, S. (PI) ; Singh, B. (PI) ; Singh, U. (PI) ; Skeff, K. (PI) ; Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI) ; Srinivas, S. (PI) ; Srinivasan, M. (PI) ; Stafford, R. (PI) ; Stefanick, M. (PI) ; Stertzer, S. (PI) ; Stevens, D. (PI) ; Stockdale, F. (PI) ; Strober, S. (PI) ; Studdert, D. (PI) ; Tai, J. (PI) ; Tamura, M. (PI) ; Tan, J. (PI) ; Telli, M. (PI) ; Tepper, R. (PI) ; Tompkins, L. (PI) ; Tremmel, J. (PI) ; Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI) ; Tsao, P. (PI) ; Upadhyay, D. (PI) ; Utz, P. (PI) ; Vagelos, R. (PI) ; Valantine, H. (PI) ; Verghese, A. (PI) ; Wakelee, H. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warvariv, V. (PI) ; Weill, D. (PI) ; Weinacker, A. (PI) ; Weng, K. (PI) ; Weng, W. (PI) ; Weyand, C. (PI) ; Wiedmann, T. (PI) ; Winkelmayer, W. (PI) ; Winkleby, M. (PI) ; Winograd, C. (PI) ; Winslow, D. (PI) ; Winter, T. (PI) ; Witteles, R. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Yabu, J. (PI) ; Yang, P. (PI) ; Yeung, A. (PI) ; Yock, P. (PI) ; Zamanian, R. (PI) ; Zehnder, J. (PI) ; Zei, P. (PI) ; Zolopa, A. (PI) ; Zulman, D. (PI) ; de Jesus Perez, V. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (SI)

MED 201: Internal Medicine: Body as Text

Body as Text refers to the idea that every patient's body tells a story. The narrative includes the past and present of a person's social and medical condition; it is a demonstration of the phenotype. The art of reading the body as text was at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, but as technology has become ascendant, bedside skills and the ability to read the text have faded. Beyond scientific knowledge and medical facts, it is this often forgotten craft which is at the heart of the excitement of being an internist. This course introduces students to the art of the clinical exam, to developing a clinical eye, and learning to see the body in a completely different way. Enrollment will be based on a lottery system, for which details will be sent to first year students at the end of mini quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MED 210: Principles and Practice of Healthcare Quality Improvement

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in healthcare quality improvement, and provide tools for translating these principles into practice. Topics include: current state, A3, SMART goals, root-cause analysis, metrics and measures, PDCA cycles, process controls, systems, and sustainability. Students have the option of completing the course curriculum in conjunction with a quality improvement/patient safety project offered by the SMS Quality Improvement Interest Group. This course will meet for four in-class sessions throughout the quarter, with students reviewing the online materials before each session. May be repeated for credit up to three quarters with continued work on a quality improvement project, and all units count towards the Quality Improvement Scholarly Concentration. Open to all.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

MED 211: Current Topics in Applied Medicine

Introduction to vaccines- discuss the basics of vaccines, including vaccines of infectious diseases vs. cancer vaccines and effective methods of vaccine delivery to achieve long-term memory immune response. Gene therapy- gene therapy for single gene disorders, cancer gene therapy, failures, and successes of gene therapies with current clinical status of cancer gene therapy. Immunotherapy- cancer immunotherapy, pros and cons of cancer immunotherapy, current status, and future targets for improvement. Drug development- drugs for cancer therapy, cellular targets of drugs for cancer therapy, and assays for drug screening and validation. Drug delivery- nanoparticles for drug delivery, exosomes, and cell membrane vesicles for developing biomimetic nano delivery vehicles for drug delivery to overcome immune system. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the MTRAM program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

MED 212A: MTRAM A: Translational Research Methods and Technologies: Cell Based Methods

In this quarter, students will learn the fundamentals of clinical sample processing, flow cytometry, CYTOF, Luminex, and nanoimmunoassays (NIA). Topics covered include applications, technical considerations, instrument set-up and QC, computational methods for data analysis, interpretation of results, and hands-on instrument demos. At its core, this course teaches the principles of the technologies, conducting data analysis and appreciating how the nature and type of data impact the analysis approach. This course is necessary to provide students with the broader skillset to conduct their capstone project and adapt and grow in the field as technologies change. Prerequisites: Acceptance and enrollment into MTRAM program. Exceptions need to be approved by the MTRAM directors. MTRAM students are required to take 3 units (lecture + lab). 1 unit course is lectures only (no lab).
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3
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