2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 11 results for: ITALIAN

ITALIAN 127: Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca

This course is both an introduction to medieval Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. In the literary sphere the course will focus primarily on the Italian lyric tradition of the Sicilian school, the Dolce Stil Novo, and Dante's early lyric poetry. From there we will read and discuss Petrarch's Canzoniere and autobiographical letters. The third part of the course will regard the short story, or novella, in Boccaccio's Decameron and its antecedent, Il Novellino. The literary genres to be explored in this course are short-form poetry and prose (sonnets, madrigals, sestinas, canzoni, and the novella). Linguistically, the course will focus on the language of literary and cultural criticism - expressing and defending opinions at an advanced level, and discussing the themes of the course fluently. The expectation is that levels of reading, writing, and speaking will improve by the end of the quarter. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be in Italian.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Mollo, V. (PI)

ITALIAN 154: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

What makes you the individual you are? Should you plan your life, or make it up as you go along? Is it always good to remember your past? Is it always good to know the truth? When does a machine become a person? What do we owe to other people? Is there always a right way to act? How can we live in a highly imperfect world? And what can film do that other media can't? We'll think about all of these great questions with the help of films that are philosophically stimulating, stylistically intriguing, and, for the most part, gripping to watch: Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Dark Knight (Nolan), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman), Arrival (Villeneuve), My Dinner with André (Malle), Blade Runner (Scott), La Jetée (Marker), Fight Club (Fincher), No Country for Old Men (Coen), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), and Memento (Nolan). Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory; and fun. We will not be using the waitlist on Axess - if you would like to enroll and the course is full/closed please email us to get on the waitlist!
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Can novels make us better people? Can movies challenge our assumptions? Can poems help us become who we are? We¿ll think about these and other questions with the help of writers like Toni Morrison, Marcel Proust, Jordan Peele, Charlie Kaufman, Rachel Cusk, William Shakespeare, and Samuel Beckett, plus thinkers like Nehamas, Nietzsche, Nussbaum, Plato, and Sartre. We¿ll also ask whether a disenchanted world can be re-enchanted; when, if ever, the truth stops being the most important thing; why we sometimes choose to read sad stories; whether we ever love someone for who they are; who could possibly want to live their same life over and over again; what it takes to make ourselves fully moral; whether it¿s ever good to be conflicted; how we can pull ourselves together; and how we can take ourselves apart. (This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 199: Individual Work

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 217: Love, Death and the Afterlife in the Medieval West (FRENCH 217, FRENCH 317, HISTORY 217D, HISTORY 317D, ITALIAN 317)

Romantic love, it is often claimed, is an invention of the High Middle Ages. The vocabulary of sexual desire that is still current in the twenty-first century was authored in the twelfth and thirteenth, by troubadours, court poets, writers like Dante; even by crusaders returning from the eastern Mediterranean. How did this devout society come to elevate the experience of sensual love? This course draws on primary sources such as medieval songs, folktales, the "epic rap battles" of the thirteenth century, along with the writings of Boccaccio, Saint Augustine and others, to understand the unexpected connections between love, death, and the afterlife from late antiquity to the fourteenth century. Each week, we will use a literary or artistic work as an interpretive window into cultural attitudes towards love, death or the afterlife. These readings are analyzed in tandem with major historical developments, including the rise of Christianity, the emergence of feudal society and chivalric culture, the crusading movement, and the social breakdown of the fourteenth century. This course is pending review for WAY-SI and WAY-A-II.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

ITALIAN 302: The Interruption of the Machine: Introduction to Sound Studies through Literature (COMPLIT 333, ENGLISH 303A, MUSIC 303, TAPS 302)

This course will introduce students to the field of Sound Studies (methodology, vocabulary, main claims) with a focus on the various sonic articulations of human-machine interactions in literature. The world of fiction as a sonic machine that articulates noise, sound, music, voice, or silence offers an excellent archive. We will read works by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Eça de Queirós, Mark Twain, the Italian Futurists, Zora Neale Hurston, and Luigi Pirandello. Secondary readings will include seminal contributions by R. Murray Schafer (the soundscape), Leo Marx (U.S. industrialization), Jacques Attali (noise and music), Mladen Dolar (philosophy and voice), Adriana Cavarero (gender, voice, and the body), Jonathan Crary (culture, aesthetics, and perception), Friedrich Kittler (media), and Daphne Brooks (black feminist sound).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ilievska, A. (PI)

ITALIAN 317: Love, Death and the Afterlife in the Medieval West (FRENCH 217, FRENCH 317, HISTORY 217D, HISTORY 317D, ITALIAN 217)

Romantic love, it is often claimed, is an invention of the High Middle Ages. The vocabulary of sexual desire that is still current in the twenty-first century was authored in the twelfth and thirteenth, by troubadours, court poets, writers like Dante; even by crusaders returning from the eastern Mediterranean. How did this devout society come to elevate the experience of sensual love? This course draws on primary sources such as medieval songs, folktales, the "epic rap battles" of the thirteenth century, along with the writings of Boccaccio, Saint Augustine and others, to understand the unexpected connections between love, death, and the afterlife from late antiquity to the fourteenth century. Each week, we will use a literary or artistic work as an interpretive window into cultural attitudes towards love, death or the afterlife. These readings are analyzed in tandem with major historical developments, including the rise of Christianity, the emergence of feudal society and chivalric culture, the crusading movement, and the social breakdown of the fourteenth century. This course is pending review for WAY-SI and WAY-A-II.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Phillips, J. (PI)

ITALIAN 369: Introduction to the Profession of Literary Studies (COMPLIT 369, DLCL 369, FRENCH 369, GERMAN 369)

A survey of how literary theory and other methods have been made institutional since the nineteenth century. The readings and conversation are designed for entering Ph.D. students in the national literature departments and comparative literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

ITALIAN 373: Concepts of Modernity I: Nihilism (COMPLIT 273B, COMPLIT 334A, FRENCH 373A, ILAC 334A, MTL 334A)

In the 1885 Preface to his unfinished work The Will to Power, Nietzsche declared: "For some time now, our whole European culture has been moving as toward a catastrophe, restlessly, violently, headlong, like a river that wants to reach the end, that no longer reflects, that is afraid to reflect." Nietzsche called the movement "nihilism." This course will reflect on major theories of nihilism as a way of reflecting on the conceptual foundations of modernity. Authors include: Kant, Hegel, Leopardi, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Simone Weil, Emile Cioran, Aimé Césaire, Monica Sjöö & Barbara Mor, and Mark Fisher
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 399: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints