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1 - 10 of 19 results for: GERMAN

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Nissler, P. (PI)

GERMAN 135: German Conversation (GERMAN 235)

This small, individualized course will offer students the chance to work on their spoken expression and critical thinking, in German. Topics will change each quarter but will span contemporary politics and culture, film, literature, and visual arts. The focus will be on speaking German in small groups, as opposed to formal presentations or written assignments. Students will have the opportunity to pursue topics of personal interest, as well as work collaboratively and individually on projects intended to foster advanced communicative skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 140: German Sports Culture and History

The course highlights specificities and societal contexts of sports in Germany and thus provides a unique point of access for understanding German culture in past and present. Concepts of competition and performance will be examined, as well as the relationships between sports and politics in different periods of modern German history. Special attention will be given to soccer but other spectator sports (cycling, gymnastics (Turnen), etc.) will be studied as well. Materials will include theoretical, literary and journalistic texts in English and German, media representations of athletic contests. To improve writing skills students can write a weekly essay on related themes. Language: German, requirement: one year of college German or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

GERMAN 149: Babylon Berlin

Berlin, 1929. A police inspector and his unlikely partner, a typist and aspiring homicide detective, turn up the case of a lifetime: a far-reaching political conspiracy in the capital of a democracy on the edge. Part noir detective thriller, part historical drama, the blockbuster German television series Babylon Berlin (2017¿ ) will serve as our springboard to understand the culture, politics, and society of the Weimar Republic (1918¿1933), a fifteen-year experiment in democracy that preceded the rise of the Third Reich. From corruption and criminality to sociopolitical upheaval and a remarkable arts scene: Berlin of the Roaring Twenties, a study in contrasts and conflicts, had it all. Does the Netflix hit harbor ¿almost eerie parallels to the present,¿ as one German newspaper recently suggested? Weekly viewings of the complete seasons one and two will be accompanied by close study of the era¿s literature, cinema, and visual arts. Readings will include texts by Alfred Döblin, Hans Fall more »
Berlin, 1929. A police inspector and his unlikely partner, a typist and aspiring homicide detective, turn up the case of a lifetime: a far-reaching political conspiracy in the capital of a democracy on the edge. Part noir detective thriller, part historical drama, the blockbuster German television series Babylon Berlin (2017¿ ) will serve as our springboard to understand the culture, politics, and society of the Weimar Republic (1918¿1933), a fifteen-year experiment in democracy that preceded the rise of the Third Reich. From corruption and criminality to sociopolitical upheaval and a remarkable arts scene: Berlin of the Roaring Twenties, a study in contrasts and conflicts, had it all. Does the Netflix hit harbor ¿almost eerie parallels to the present,¿ as one German newspaper recently suggested? Weekly viewings of the complete seasons one and two will be accompanied by close study of the era¿s literature, cinema, and visual arts. Readings will include texts by Alfred Döblin, Hans Fallada, Erich Kästner, Mascha Kaléko, Irmgard Keun, Siegfried Kracauer, Gabriele Tergit, and Kurt Tucholsky. Throughout the term we will also pay careful attention to the media-theoretical implications of the series: What is ¿quality TV¿? How does seriality influence storytelling and viewing? In what ways does Babylon Berlin reflect on film as a medium? What role do montage and collage play? Assessment will be based on active class participation; a series of short viewing and reading reflections; a midterm scene analysis assignment; and a final research project that will delve into specific historical intertexts (figures, sites, objects) taken up in Babylon Berlin.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: George, A. (PI)

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Can novels make us better people? Can movies challenge our assumptions? Can poems help us become who we are? We¿ll think about these and other questions with the help of writers like Toni Morrison, Marcel Proust, Jordan Peele, Charlie Kaufman, Rachel Cusk, William Shakespeare, and Samuel Beckett, plus thinkers like Nehamas, Nietzsche, Nussbaum, Plato, and Sartre. We¿ll also ask whether a disenchanted world can be re-enchanted; when, if ever, the truth stops being the most important thing; why we sometimes choose to read sad stories; whether we ever love someone for who they are; who could possibly want to live their same life over and over again; what it takes to make ourselves fully moral; whether it¿s ever good to be conflicted; how we can pull ourselves together; and how we can take ourselves apart. (This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 230: German Literature (800-1700) (GERMAN 330)

As a survey of medieval and early modern German literature, this seminar is reading intensive. In order to help structure reading and discussions, we will examine these texts from a variety of perspectives, especially Global Medieval Studies. Along the way we will interrogate how this literature grapples with ideas of nationhood and community, identity (race, class, gender, etc.), Otherness, and what is German. Texts include: Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival, Thüring von Ringoltingen's Melusine, Grimmelshausen's Courasche, and many more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 235: German Conversation (GERMAN 135)

This small, individualized course will offer students the chance to work on their spoken expression and critical thinking, in German. Topics will change each quarter but will span contemporary politics and culture, film, literature, and visual arts. The focus will be on speaking German in small groups, as opposed to formal presentations or written assignments. Students will have the opportunity to pursue topics of personal interest, as well as work collaboratively and individually on projects intended to foster advanced communicative skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 240: Route-Place-Object: Re-defining "Cultural Landscape" in Medieval Germany (GERMAN 340)

In modern perception, the definition of Germany's various cultural landscapes often follows narratives of regional remoteness and aesthetic coherency. Today's Bundesland (federal state) of Hesse makes a case in point. Ever since the Brothers Grimm collected many of their fairy tales there, its image is defined by ideas of small picturesque towns with half-timbered houses and impressive castles on hilltops. However, a closer look clearly reveals that Hesse's countryside was and is rather heterogeneous and diverse in its architectural and artistic heritage, just like in many other "typical" German regions. In this class, we invite students to study the rich artistic heritage of medieval Hesse with us in order to re-define a scholarly concept of "cultural landscape" as a dynamic interaction of route, place, and object. Rather than being a remote region, Hesse was determined by important trans-European routes enabling the transfer of objects and ideas. Along these passages, a dynamic netwo more »
In modern perception, the definition of Germany's various cultural landscapes often follows narratives of regional remoteness and aesthetic coherency. Today's Bundesland (federal state) of Hesse makes a case in point. Ever since the Brothers Grimm collected many of their fairy tales there, its image is defined by ideas of small picturesque towns with half-timbered houses and impressive castles on hilltops. However, a closer look clearly reveals that Hesse's countryside was and is rather heterogeneous and diverse in its architectural and artistic heritage, just like in many other "typical" German regions. In this class, we invite students to study the rich artistic heritage of medieval Hesse with us in order to re-define a scholarly concept of "cultural landscape" as a dynamic interaction of route, place, and object. Rather than being a remote region, Hesse was determined by important trans-European routes enabling the transfer of objects and ideas. Along these passages, a dynamic network of micro-landscapes around certain places like towns, abbeys, castles but also bridges with partly distinct political and religious connotations could both develop and transform over a long period. It is our aim to create a better understanding for a historically grounded diversity of German cultural landscapes.NO CLASS during the first week. Class will begin 10/5.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Spaeth, M. (PI)

GERMAN 267: Prospects for Transatlantic Relations: What Holds the West Together? (GERMAN 367)

This seminar treats contemporary issues in trans-Atlantic relations including topics such as challenges to the international order (Russia), economics of inflation and energy transition, and democracy under stress. Preparation of individual research papers. Meeting times: This block seminar will meet from 9:00am to 11:00am in room 260-252 on Monday, November 7, Wednesday, November 9, and Friday, November 11, 2022, as well as other occasional meetings TBD.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
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