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1 - 10 of 20 results for: FILMEDIA

FILMEDIA 4: Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to Film Study introduces you to film as art, as entertainment, a field of study, and an everyday cultural practice. This course enables you to analyze films in terms of their formal elements, themes, and narrative structures. You learn to 'read' details of cinematic 'language' such as the arrangement of shots (editing), the composition and framing of a shot (cinematography), the overall look of a film (mise-en-scene), and its sound environment. We not only identify such cinematic details, but also consider how they contribute to the overall meaning of a film. Thinking about film and writing about film are intricately linked and inform each other deeply. Learning to write about film with sophistication requires a grasp of the mechanics of writing, familiarity with film terminology, and an understanding of film theory and history. This course helps you develop skills in critical viewing, reading, and writing. We explore basic concepts that have been important to the study of film, such as genre, authorship, and stardom to comprehend how films make meaning within their social, political, cultural, and historical contexts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FILMEDIA 6: Media and Mediums (FILMEDIA 306)

What is a medium? This course starts from the assumption that the answer to this question is not as obvious as it might at first appear. Clearly, we know some media when we see them: radio, film, and television are in many ways paradigmatic media of the twentieth century. But what about the computational, networked media of the twenty-first century? Are these still media in the same sense, or has the nature of media changed with the emergence of digital technologies? And what, for that matter, about pre-technical media? Is painting a medium in the same sense that oil or acrylic are media, or in the sense that we speak of mixed media? Is language a medium? Are numbers? Is the body? As we shall see, the question of what a medium is raises a number of other questions of a theoretical or even philosophical nature. How is our experience of the world affected or shaped by media? Are knowledge and perception possible apart from media, or are they always mediated by the apparatuses, instrument more »
What is a medium? This course starts from the assumption that the answer to this question is not as obvious as it might at first appear. Clearly, we know some media when we see them: radio, film, and television are in many ways paradigmatic media of the twentieth century. But what about the computational, networked media of the twenty-first century? Are these still media in the same sense, or has the nature of media changed with the emergence of digital technologies? And what, for that matter, about pre-technical media? Is painting a medium in the same sense that oil or acrylic are media, or in the sense that we speak of mixed media? Is language a medium? Are numbers? Is the body? As we shall see, the question of what a medium is raises a number of other questions of a theoretical or even philosophical nature. How is our experience of the world affected or shaped by media? Are knowledge and perception possible apart from media, or are they always mediated by the apparatuses, instruments, or assemblages of media? What is the relation between the forms and the contents of media, and how does this relation bear on questions of aesthetics, science, technology, or politics? The lecture-based course addresses these and other questions and seeks in this way to introduce a way of thinking about media that goes beyond taken-for-granted ideas and assumptions, and that has a potentially transformative effect on a wide range of theoretical and practical interests.Film & Media Studies majors and minors must enroll for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMEDIA 38: Comics: More than Words (DLCL 238, ENGLISH 1C)

This research unit looks at Comics from a transnational, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter we organize a series of lectures, reading sessions, and workshops around a main topic. Some previous topics that we have explored are: Postcolonialism and Decoloniality (Fall 2021), Feminisms (Winter 2022), and Superheroes (Spring 2022). This year we plan on exploring topics such as Mangas (Fall 2022), Computer Science (Winter 2023), and Comic Theory (Spring 2023). We gather three times per quarter on Zoom or in person. To earn the unit, students must attend all events hosted during the quarter, do the readings in advance of the meeting, and participate actively in the discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

FILMEDIA 50Q: The Video Essay: Writing with Video about Media and Culture

In this seminar, we explore what it means to 'write with video,' and we learn to make effective and engaging video essays. Specifically, we examine strategies for communicating through video, and we conduct hands-on exercises using digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film, television, video games, online media, art, and culture. Compared with traditional text-based arguments, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. Video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any easier than an essay composed with ink and paper. Like the written essay, the new technology introduces its own challenges and choices, including decisions about organization of space and time, audiovisual materials, onscreen text, voiceover commentary, and visual effects. By taking a hands-on approach, we develop our skills with editing software such a more »
In this seminar, we explore what it means to 'write with video,' and we learn to make effective and engaging video essays. Specifically, we examine strategies for communicating through video, and we conduct hands-on exercises using digital video editing software to construct arguments, analyses, and interpretations of film, television, video games, online media, art, and culture. Compared with traditional text-based arguments, the video essay offers a remarkably direct mode of communicating critical and analytical ideas. Video essayists can simply show their viewers what they want them to see. This does not mean, however, that it is any easier than an essay composed with ink and paper. Like the written essay, the new technology introduces its own challenges and choices, including decisions about organization of space and time, audiovisual materials, onscreen text, voiceover commentary, and visual effects. By taking a hands-on approach, we develop our skills with editing software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple's Final Cut Pro while also cultivating our awareness of the formal and narrative techniques employed in cinema and other moving-image media. Through weekly assignments and group critique sessions, we learn to express ourselves more effectively and creatively in audiovisual media. As a culmination of our efforts, we assemble a group exhibition of our best video essays for public display on campus.nNo previous experience is required, but a willingness to learn new technologies (in particular, video editing software) is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Denson, S. (PI)

FILMEDIA 100B: History of World Cinema II: The Films of Ernst Lubitsch (FILMEDIA 300B)

Provides an overview of cinema made around the world between 1930 and 1960, highlighting technical, cultural, political, and economic forces that shaped mid-twentieth-century cinema. We study key film movements and national cinemas towards developing a formal, historical, and theoretical appreciation of a variety of commercial and art film traditions. Specific topics may vary by term/year/instructor. This term's topic: Ernst Lubitsch was: a stage actor in Berlin; a comic actor in early German cinema; Germany's most profitable director in the early 1920s; a director of subtle silent comedies in Hollywood in the later `20s; an innovative director of sound musicals and comedies in the 1930s; head of production for Paramount Pictures; and one of the few directors whose name and likeness were familiar to audiences across America, one famed for what became known as The Lubitsch Touch. The course considers Lubitsch in all these contexts. Charts intersections with collaborators, genre conventions, sexuality and censorship, and studio control. Lubitsch's style depends on performance, so attention will be given to film acting as he came to shape it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Bukatman, S. (PI)

FILMEDIA 210A: Documentary Perspectives: The Essay Film (FILMEDIA 410A)

In this class we will explore the essay film as a distinct genre of documentary filmmaking. The course is organized as an inquiry into the nature of the essay film, its historical and formal development, as well as a survey of the major works that make up this genre. Each student will be an active participant in this investigation through class discussions, readings and writing assignments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Petrovic, T. (PI)

FILMEDIA 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, ARTHIST 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMEDIA 280: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Students must obtain a new I-20 with CPT authorization prior to the employment start date. Professional experience in a field related to the cinematic arts (film, television, media) for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for production companies, producers, studios, networks, films, television series, directors, screenwriters, non-profit organizations, academic publications and related workplaces. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. Students submit three self-assessments, and evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

FILMEDIA 295: Films & Media Studies Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the cinematic arts (film, television, media) for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for production companies, producers, studios, networks, films, television series, directors, screenwriters, non-profit organizations, academic publications and related workplaces. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. Students submit weekly self-assessments, and evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Summer internships may be credited in fall quarter. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 10 units total)

FILMEDIA 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 10 units total)
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