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1 - 10 of 60 results for: ENGLISH

ENGLISH 1C: Comics: More than Words (DLCL 238, FILMEDIA 38)

This research unit looks at Comics from a transnational, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter we organize a series of lectures, reading sessions, and workshops around a main topic. Some previous topics that we have explored are: Postcolonialism and Decoloniality (Fall 2021), Feminisms (Winter 2022), and Superheroes (Spring 2022). This year we plan on exploring topics such as Mangas (Fall 2022), Computer Science (Winter 2023), and Comic Theory (Spring 2023). We gather three times per quarter on Zoom or in person. To earn the unit, students must attend all events hosted during the quarter, do the readings in advance of the meeting, and participate actively in the discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

ENGLISH 1G: The Gothic: Transcultural, Multilingual, and Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Genre

Description: This course is a research platform for the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the Gothic literary and cinematic genres. We consider the Gothic to have rich traditions whose contributions to Queer and LGBTQ+ studies, cultural theory, political economy, bio-ethics, and techno-science, remain under-explored. By looking at the world from the peripheralized standpoints of the monstrous, the abject, the dark, the uncanny, and the tumultuous, the Gothic offers unique though often overlooked critical insights into modern societies. Students enrolled in this course will participate in research activities and reading discussions oriented towards crafting interdisciplinary Gothic syllabi for the future and a cross-cultural Encyclopedia of the Gothic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

ENGLISH 5P: WISE: Literature and the Internet

It is widely held that the term ¿cyberspace¿ first appeared not in the giddy reports of business consultants or futurologists, but in a short story by science fiction author William Gibson. Literature has long functioned as a kind of incubator for some of the most important concepts and metaphors that we use to understand the massive transformations that digital technologies have effected within modern life. In this class, we will read novels, short stories, and poetry from the last fifty years that try to capture the new forms of experience that these technologies¿considered broadly under the rubric of ¿the internet¿¿have brought into being. Drawing on media-theoretical and Marxist approaches in particular, we will work together to develop a critical vocabulary for analyzing the two-way traffic between digital media and literary forms, from cyberpunk fiction to Instagram poetry. (Note: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. For enrollment permission contact vbeebe@stanford.edu.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Therieau, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 5R: WISE: American Picaresque: Identity and Satire in the 20th Century

¿I am an invisible man,¿ says the unnamed hero of Ralph Ellison¿s classic picaresque novel from 1952. Generically picaresque refers to works of satirical fiction that depict the episodic adventures of a likable roguish hero. This course will explore 20th-century American variations on the genre, focusing on three novels that feature seemingly invisible half-outsiders on the move through different settings and social spheres. What do these narratives suggest about the politics of visibility and marginalization? How do they employ satire, ridicule, wordplay, and irony to expose social corruption, hypocrisy, ignorance, and greed? How do they use a picaresque hero¿s half-outsider status to probe questions of equality and belonging based on race, gender, class, and ability? What do they suggest about the possibility of social acceptance for someone with a marginalized identity? We¿ll let these and other questions motivate our tour of 20th-century American picaresque and at the same time lea more »
¿I am an invisible man,¿ says the unnamed hero of Ralph Ellison¿s classic picaresque novel from 1952. Generically picaresque refers to works of satirical fiction that depict the episodic adventures of a likable roguish hero. This course will explore 20th-century American variations on the genre, focusing on three novels that feature seemingly invisible half-outsiders on the move through different settings and social spheres. What do these narratives suggest about the politics of visibility and marginalization? How do they employ satire, ridicule, wordplay, and irony to expose social corruption, hypocrisy, ignorance, and greed? How do they use a picaresque hero¿s half-outsider status to probe questions of equality and belonging based on race, gender, class, and ability? What do they suggest about the possibility of social acceptance for someone with a marginalized identity? We¿ll let these and other questions motivate our tour of 20th-century American picaresque and at the same time learn how the picaresque can help us understand literary history more broadly. Novels include Gentlemen Prefer Blondes by Anita Loos (1927), Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (1952), and The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo by Oscar Zeta Acosta (1974). Critics and theorists may include Mikhail Bakhtin, Claudio Guillén, Susan Lanser, and Michael Hames-García. (Note: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. For enrollment permission contact vbeebe@stanford.edu.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Ayala, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 5S: WISE: Thoreau and His Readers

¿Some historical phenomena need large-scale analysis,¿ writes literary critic Wai-Chee Dimock. In this course, we will take Dimock¿s invitation as we study the far-reaching resonances of a text that might seem parochial: Henry David Thoreau¿s Walden. Thoreau¿s account of his ¿experiment in living¿ for two years at Walden Pond proved polarizing when he first published it in 1854. Even today Thoreau can be read as either dangerously self-indulgent or radically self-reliant. But while his political thought is often associated with modern libertarianism, it has also shaped an active, deeply egalitarian form of civic engagement from the nineteenth century on. Indeed, the themes that cut across Walden and that anchor Thoreau¿s speeches and essays on civil disobedience have made him a writer with a direct influence on such twentieth-century revolutionaries as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the same time, Thoreau has played a foundational role in the development of environmental more »
¿Some historical phenomena need large-scale analysis,¿ writes literary critic Wai-Chee Dimock. In this course, we will take Dimock¿s invitation as we study the far-reaching resonances of a text that might seem parochial: Henry David Thoreau¿s Walden. Thoreau¿s account of his ¿experiment in living¿ for two years at Walden Pond proved polarizing when he first published it in 1854. Even today Thoreau can be read as either dangerously self-indulgent or radically self-reliant. But while his political thought is often associated with modern libertarianism, it has also shaped an active, deeply egalitarian form of civic engagement from the nineteenth century on. Indeed, the themes that cut across Walden and that anchor Thoreau¿s speeches and essays on civil disobedience have made him a writer with a direct influence on such twentieth-century revolutionaries as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the same time, Thoreau has played a foundational role in the development of environmental thought and ethics. In this course, we will read Walden slowly, pairing Thoreau¿s work with the contributions of other writers and activists whose work either references or resonates with Thoreau¿s, from the mid-nineteenth century to today. Bringing a comparative lens to topics ranging from abolitionism to environmentalism, we will consider the historical contexts and trajectories of these movements and attempt to articulate our own sense of ethical and political responsibility in the twenty-first century. (Note: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. For enrollment permission contact vbeebe@stanford.edu.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Brush, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. NOTE: For undergraduates only. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CFS: Fire Stories: Narrative in the Digital Age

How do we tell stories in the age of the internet, social media, and new technology? How has the art of storytelling evolved over time? In this Creative Writing course we will explore storytelling in the digital age. We will be reading and writing in a variety of genres, workshopping our own personal projects, and considering ways in which storytelling has shifted from oral traditions to modern iterations like podcasts, songwriting, filmmaking, and multimedia. Assignments will range from reading Justin Torres' novel, 'We the Animals,' to watching films like 'Birdman' and 'La Jetée.' We will be listening to albums, looking at photo essays, and frequently meeting outdoors to tell stories around a fire. Anyone with a sense of adventure is welcome!
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 10E: Intro to English I: Love and Death from Chaucer to Milton

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Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 13Q: Imaginative Realms

This class looks at the tradition of the imagined universe in fiction and poetry. Special topics include magical realism, artificial intelligence, and dystopias. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 19Q: I Bet You Think You're Funny: Humor Writing Workshop

Nothing is harder than being funny on purpose. We often associate humor with lightness, and sometimes that's appropriate, but humor is inextricably interlinked with pain and anger, and our funniest moments often spring from our deepest wounds. Humor can also allow us a platform for rage and indignation when other forms of rhetoric feel inadequate. This workshop will take students through the techniques and aesthetics of humor writing, in a variety of forms, and the main product of the quarter will be to submit for workshop a sustained piece of humor writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Porter, E. (PI)
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