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1 - 10 of 60 results for: EE

EE 14N: Things about Stuff

Preference to freshmen. The stories behind disruptive inventions such as the telegraph, telephone, wireless, television, transistor, and chip are as important as the inventions themselves, for they elucidate broadly applicable scientific principles. Focus is on studying consumer devices; projects include building batteries, energy conversion devices and semiconductors from pocket change. Students may propose topics and projects of interest to them. The trajectory of the course is determined in large part by the students themselves.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Lee, T. (PI)

EE 60N: Man versus Nature: Coping with Disasters Using Space Technology (GEOPHYS 60N)

Preference to freshman. Natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, hurricanes, and fires, and how they affect people and society; great disasters such as asteroid impacts that periodically obliterate many species of life. Scientific issues, political and social consequences, costs of disaster mitigation, and how scientific knowledge affects policy. How spaceborne imaging technology makes it possible to respond quickly and mitigate consequences; how it is applied to natural disasters; and remote sensing data manipulation and analysis. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Zebker, H. (PI)

EE 84N: From the Internet for People to the Internet of Things

Driven by the ubiquity of the Internet and advances in various technological fields, all aspects of the physical world in which we live are undergoing a major transformation. Underlying this transformation is a concept known as the Internet of Things (IoT) which envisions that every physical object in the world could be connected to the Internet. This concept is at the root of such developments as the fourth industrial revolution, precision agriculture, smart cities, intelligent transportation, home and building automation, precision medicine, etc. In this seminar, we trace back the origins of the IoT concept in terms of both the vision and pioneering work, identify the building blocks of an IoT system, and explore enabling technologies pertaining to the devices that get attached to things (possibly comprising sensors, actuators, and embedded systems) and the communications capabilities (RFID, Bluetooth, wireless sensor networks, Wi-Fi, Low Power WANs, cellular networks, vehicular communications). Students will apply the acquired knowledge to the design of IoT systems meeting specific objectives in various application domains.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 100: The Electrical Engineering Profession

Lectures/discussions on topics of importance to the electrical engineering professional. Continuing education, professional societies, intellectual property and patents, ethics, entrepreneurial engineering, and engineering management.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Pauly, J. (PI)

EE 108: Digital System Design

Digital circuit, logic, and system design. Digital representation of information. CMOS logic circuits. Combinational logic design. Logic building blocks, idioms, and structured design. Sequential logic design and timing analysis. Clocks and synchronization. Finite state machines. Microcode control. Digital system design. Control and datapath partitioning. Lab. *In Autumn, enrollment preference is given to EE majors. Any EE majors who must enroll in Autumn are invited to contact the instructor. Formerly EE 108A.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mitra, S. (PI)

EE 114: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 214A)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Arbabian, A. (PI)

EE 153: Power Electronics (EE 253)

Addressing the energy challenges of today and the environmental challenges of the future will require efficient energy conversion techniques. This course will discuss the circuits used to efficiently convert ac power to dc power, dc power from one voltage level to another, and dc power to ac power. The components used in these circuits (e.g., diodes, transistors, capacitors, inductors) will also be covered in detail to highlight their behavior in a practical implementation. A lab will be held with the class where students will obtain hands on experience with power electronic circuits. For WIM credit, students must enroll in EE 153 for 4 units. No exceptions. Formerly EE 292J. Prerequisite: EE 101B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EE 156: Board Level Design (EE 256)

The ability to rapidly create board level electronics at prototype and short run volumes is enabling; Board Level Design teaches how to do this. This course focuses on applying circuit design concepts to rapidly create electronics to augment existing research instruments, explore and reduce technical risk, and provide engineering samples for evaluation. Students will send several PCBs for fabrication during the Quarter. The PCBs will be "brought-up" and tested to confirm functionality and performance to specification. Undergraduate EE majors will gain deeper exposure to circuits and planar electromagnetics. Prerequisites: EE 42, EE 101A, and EE 108 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Clark, S. (PI)

EE 160A: Principles of Robot Autonomy I (AA 174A, AA 274A, CS 237A, EE 260A)

Basic principles for endowing mobile autonomous robots with perception, planning, and decision-making capabilities. Algorithmic approaches for robot perception, localization, and simultaneous localization and mapping; control of non-linear systems, learning-based control, and robot motion planning; introduction to methodologies for reasoning under uncertainty, e.g., (partially observable) Markov decision processes. Extensive use of the Robot Operating System (ROS) for demonstrations and hands-on activities. Prerequisites: CS 106A or equivalent, CME 100 or equivalent (for linear algebra), and CME 106 or equivalent (for probability theory).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

EE 169: Introduction to Bioimaging

Bioimaging is important for both clinical medicine, and medical research. This course will provide a introduction to several of the major imaging modalities, using a signal processing perspective. The course will start with an introduction to multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, and image quality metrics. It will then study projection imaging systems (projection X-Ray), backprojection based systems (CT, PET, and SPECT), systems that use beam forming (ultrasound), and systems that use Fourier encoding (MRI). Prerequisites: EE102A, EE102B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Pauly, J. (PI)
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