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1 - 10 of 30 results for: EARTHSYS

EARTHSYS 2: Chemistry of the Earth and Planets (GEOLSCI 2)

Chemistry of the Earth and PlanetsCouse Description: Introduction to chemical principles with an emphasis on applications in the Earth Sciences. Topics include: origin and distribution of the elements in the solar system and on Earth, origin and structure of the Earth, its oceans and atmosphere, crystal chemistry, structure, and transformations, predicting and balancing reactions; thermodynamics, phase diagrams, high temperature and aqueous geochemistry, weathering, isotope geochemistry, and organic geochemistry. Students will also be exposed to analytical methods used in the Earth sciences.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

EARTHSYS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (GEOLSCI 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? In this course, we explore these questions by developing an understanding of life's multi-billion year history using tools from biology, geology, paleontology, and chemistry. We discuss major groups of organisms, when they appear in the rock record, and how they have interacted with the Earth to create the habitats and ecosystems that we are familiar with today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 91EJ: Environmental Justice Storytelling: Writing for Impact (PWR 91EPA)

In this class students will explore groundbreaking environmental justice (EJ) stories created in multiple mediums including podcasts, documentaries, op-eds, and social media. Over the quarter you will research and develop your own EJ story and select a genre to communicate it as you work through key questions to take outside of the class and into your career: What is the role of the writer in addressing our greatest environmental and social challenges? What impact can stories have in shifting power and changing policies? How do we transform mainstream narratives? How do we engage the most impacted voices in the making of our stories? How do we figure out the audience to reach and how best to reach them? Finally, where are the places we find hope in this work? This course does not fulfill the WR1 or WR2 requirement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Polk, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 103: Understand Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The 4 unit course includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, homework assignments, one on-campus field trip during lecture time and two off-campus field trips with brief report assignments. Off-campus field trips to wind farms, solar farms, nuclear power plants, natural gas power plants, hydroelectric dams, etc. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (Mondays, 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM). Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understand-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understand Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

"Everything is somewhere, and that somewhere matters." The rapid growth and maturity of spatial data technologies over the past decade represent a paradigm shift in the applied use of location data from high-level overviews of administrative interests, to highly personalized location-based services that place the individual at the center of the map, at all times. The use of spatial data and related technology continues to grow in fields ranging from environmental sciences to epidemiology to market prediction. This course will present an overview of current approaches to the use of spatial data and its creation, capture, management, analysis and presentation, in a research context. Topics will include modeling of geographic objects and associated data, modeling of geographic space and the conceptual foundations of "spatial thinking," field data collection, basic spatial statistical analysis, remote sensing & the use of satellite-based imagery, "Big Data" and machine learning approaches more »
"Everything is somewhere, and that somewhere matters." The rapid growth and maturity of spatial data technologies over the past decade represent a paradigm shift in the applied use of location data from high-level overviews of administrative interests, to highly personalized location-based services that place the individual at the center of the map, at all times. The use of spatial data and related technology continues to grow in fields ranging from environmental sciences to epidemiology to market prediction. This course will present an overview of current approaches to the use of spatial data and its creation, capture, management, analysis and presentation, in a research context. Topics will include modeling of geographic objects and associated data, modeling of geographic space and the conceptual foundations of "spatial thinking," field data collection, basic spatial statistical analysis, remote sensing & the use of satellite-based imagery, "Big Data" and machine learning approaches to spatial data, and cartographic design and presentation including the use of web-based "Storymap" platforms. The course will consist of weekly lectures, guest speakers, computer lab assignments, midterm and final exam, as well as an individual final project requirement.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR

EARTHSYS 179: Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (BIO 179, BIO 279, EARTHSYS 279)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, through two interwoven pathways. One is biophysical, focused on human dependence and impacts on Earths life-support systems. If well managed, lands, waters, and biodiversity yield a flow of vital benefits that sustain and fulfill human life. A wild bee buzzes through a farm, pollinating vegetables as it goes. Nearby, wetlands remove chemicals from the farms runoff, protecting a source of drinking water. In parklands at a cities edge, kids play and adults walk and talk, their exposure to nature promoting physical activity and improved mental health. The trees help maintain a favorable climate, locally and globally. We will develop a framework and practical tools for quantifying this stream of benefits from nature to people.nThe second pathway is social, economic, and philosophical, weaving through concepts of well-being, human development, and conservation and the ethics and effects of their pursuit. We will look back, ahead into the f more »
This course explores the science of valuing nature, through two interwoven pathways. One is biophysical, focused on human dependence and impacts on Earths life-support systems. If well managed, lands, waters, and biodiversity yield a flow of vital benefits that sustain and fulfill human life. A wild bee buzzes through a farm, pollinating vegetables as it goes. Nearby, wetlands remove chemicals from the farms runoff, protecting a source of drinking water. In parklands at a cities edge, kids play and adults walk and talk, their exposure to nature promoting physical activity and improved mental health. The trees help maintain a favorable climate, locally and globally. We will develop a framework and practical tools for quantifying this stream of benefits from nature to people.nThe second pathway is social, economic, and philosophical, weaving through concepts of well-being, human development, and conservation and the ethics and effects of their pursuit. We will look back, ahead into the future, and inward, taking a global view and considering diverse cultural perspectives. Our discussions will be situated in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, movements for racial justice and socioeconomic equity, and efforts to enable people and nature to thrive in cities and countries worldwide.nAll of the science we will explore is in service of decisions. We will dive into real-world examples to see how science can inform why, where, how, and how much people need nature. We will learn the basics of the InVEST tools (for Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) to quantify benefits of nature, the equitability in access to these benefits, and the transformation of policy, finance, management, and practice to sustain and enhance them. nThe course is intended for diverse, advanced students, with interests in research and in moving from science to action for a more just and sustainable world. The instructors aim to provide an enjoyable and productive opportunity to connect remotely and yet with a lot of heart as well as intellectual drive and commitment, bringing empathy, flexibility and hopefully some humor to the day-to-day challenges we are all facing in different difficult ways. Prerequisite: Basic to intermediate GIS (Geographic Information Systems) skills are necessary. We will help with these, but not teach GIS specifically in class. Basic skills include, for example: working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; changing the symbology of rasters and shapefiles in your chosen GIS; editing raster and shapefile attribute tables; understanding coordinate systems and how to re-project layers; looking at individual raster cell values; and performing basic raster math.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

EARTHSYS 189: Agroecology (EARTHSYS 289C)

Agroecology is a scientific discipline rooted in indigenous land stewardship and food production practices. It uses traditional ecological knowledge and insights from multiple academic disciplines to design, manage, and evaluate agricultural systems that are productive and also resource conserving, community building, and resilient in the face of climate change. This course is an Earth Systems practicum that provides students with a broad overview of the field of agroecology while grounding them in hands-on agroecosystem stewardship practices at the Stanford Educational Farm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

EARTHSYS 191: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 291)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in Earth or environmental science and/or policy studies, or in communication or journalism studies with a specific interest in environmental and science communication. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core ( EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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