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1 - 10 of 13 results for: CHPR

CHPR 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

CHPR 201: Introduction to Science of Healthy Living

This introduction to the science of healthy living (primarily U.S.) highlights preventable causes of mortality, i.e. modifiable risk factors, national lifestyle recommendations and behavioral change principles for reducing chronic disease risk. A life course perspective is presented as a trajectory from fetal/neonatal to childhood and adolescence to young, middle-ages and older adults, with recognition of the importance of social determinants of health. Sex & gender differences are also presented. Unless otherwise noted, all lectures are presented by Course Director, Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR masters students, who must take the course for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHPR 211: Introduction to Clinical Trials: Design, Conduct, and Analysis

This course covers basic concepts in the design, conduct and analysis of clinical trials. Various phases and designs of clinical trials will be discussed. Components of a trial protocol and the statistical analysis plan will be discussed. Data collection, management, and study monitoring for the conduct of clinical trials will be addressed. The roles of the Institutional Review Board (IRB), Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) and federal regulatory agencies in the approval and review of ongoing clinical trials will be discussed. Students are assumed familiar with topics taught in introductory statistics (summary statistics, hypothesis testing, p-values, confidence intervals, and regression). Prereqs: An introductory course in statistics/biostatistics or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Chen, Y. (PI)

CHPR 220: Responsible Conduct of Research in the Community

This course will engage CHPR students pursuing community-based participatory research. Discussions will center around ethical and practical issues to prepare them for the CHPR program, including course planning, internship, thesis writing, and career development. Discussions will address specifics of conducting research at Stanford as well as issues that may arise in the community at large and in their careers to follow. Course limited to current CHPR master's students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Robinson, J. (PI)

CHPR 228: Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials

Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other pra more »
Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other practical considerations necessary to produce, deliver, monitor, and disseminate an intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. Examples drawn from across the behavioral spectrum and include tobacco control, physical activity, healthy diet, stress and distress, as well as consideration of the complexities of extending interventions to target multiple risk behaviors. Students develop a foundational understanding of behavior change theory, rigorous research methods, and creative design strategies to advance the health of individuals and communities. Students taking 2 units only will complete all 4 homework assignments, attend 8 of 10 class sessions, and complete an abbreviated final abstract plus figures/tables instead of a final paper. The grading, in this instance, will be the medical school option of credit/no credit. CHPR master's students must enroll for 3 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHPR 234: Applying Contemplative Practices

Knowledge and skills for applying contemplative practices to promote individual and community health and well-being in a variety of settings (e.g., clinics, hospitals, non-profit and for-profit organizations, schools, government agencies, secular and spiritual communities, etc.) is the focus of this course. In-depth exploration is provided through: 1) scholarly articles on contemplative neuroscience, biopsychosocial research, theoretical models, and interventions, and 2) experiential learning in which students are guided in doing diverse contemplative practices, including silence, centering, meditation, labyrinth walking, yoga, qigong, self-compassion, deep listening, storytelling, journaling, lectio divina, prayer, ritual, and compassionate action. Multi-modal learning activities include videos, field experiences, guest speakers, ancient and modern texts, class discussions, and personal reflections. In-depth understanding of contemplative practices is developed through consideration o more »
Knowledge and skills for applying contemplative practices to promote individual and community health and well-being in a variety of settings (e.g., clinics, hospitals, non-profit and for-profit organizations, schools, government agencies, secular and spiritual communities, etc.) is the focus of this course. In-depth exploration is provided through: 1) scholarly articles on contemplative neuroscience, biopsychosocial research, theoretical models, and interventions, and 2) experiential learning in which students are guided in doing diverse contemplative practices, including silence, centering, meditation, labyrinth walking, yoga, qigong, self-compassion, deep listening, storytelling, journaling, lectio divina, prayer, ritual, and compassionate action. Multi-modal learning activities include videos, field experiences, guest speakers, ancient and modern texts, class discussions, and personal reflections. In-depth understanding of contemplative practices is developed through consideration of contemplative practices with respect to behavioral science, ethics, social justice, inclusion and diversity, qualitative and quantitative research, motivational interviewing, compassionate communication, design thinking and relationship-based care, including deep listening, open-minded observation, empathic need-finding, pattern recognition, and creative confidence. The course culminates with students' presentations of their original design for a research-based health and well-being program or policy incorporating contemplative practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Rich, T. (PI)

CHPR 237: Hunger & Food Insecurity: Challenges and Solution

This course will examine local, national, and global hunger issues and solutions. The focus of each class will acknowledge and examine the associations between health disparities, structural racism, systemic poverty, and the built environment that create barriers to sustainable availability and access to nutritious foods. The course will focus on advancing knowledge and skills in communication and critical thinking. Assignments will include readings, submitting written reflections, participating in class discussions, and a final project. Priority for enrollment given to current CHPR masters students, who must enroll for a letter grade
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

CHPR 240: Prevention Research: the Science of Healthy Living

Features the research of faculty in the Stanford Prevention Research Center and focuses on key health issues over the life course (prenatal through childhood, young to middle-aged, older and elderly adults). Topics include chronic disease (global and U.S.) epidemiology; application of behavioral science to risk reduction; nutrition; weight management; physical activity; stopping smoking; public health; community health and community-based prevention; national prevention strategy; applying communication technology to health promotion. Prerequisite: HumBio 126 or concurrent enrollment in CHPR 201.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHPR 244: Contemplation by Design Summit: Translating contemplative science into timely community programming

Engage with contemplative science scholars, leaders, and teachers who apply contemplative practices to cultivate the democratic promise for equality, liberty, health, and well-being. This workshop immerses students in community-based engaged learning in which the community is the people of Stanford (students, staff, faculty, alumni, retirees, patients,and members of the local community). The course includes participation in two, Saturday, in-person, half-day sessions and in several online key sessions in the Contemplation By Design Summit. See the course notes section for the names of the Summit speakers and times of the Summit sessions included in this course. Through a three-part process, students will develop skills for: translating theory into practice, engaging in dialogue with the Summit speakers, and designing a contemplative science-based community program. Pre-workshop readings and an intention paper, and a post-workshop reflection paper and group discussion provide opportunit more »
Engage with contemplative science scholars, leaders, and teachers who apply contemplative practices to cultivate the democratic promise for equality, liberty, health, and well-being. This workshop immerses students in community-based engaged learning in which the community is the people of Stanford (students, staff, faculty, alumni, retirees, patients,and members of the local community). The course includes participation in two, Saturday, in-person, half-day sessions and in several online key sessions in the Contemplation By Design Summit. See the course notes section for the names of the Summit speakers and times of the Summit sessions included in this course. Through a three-part process, students will develop skills for: translating theory into practice, engaging in dialogue with the Summit speakers, and designing a contemplative science-based community program. Pre-workshop readings and an intention paper, and a post-workshop reflection paper and group discussion provide opportunities for exploring theoretical and methodological questions encountered in the translation of contemplative science to community programming.This course provides direct experience of a community-based contemplative science program on a university campus.Scholars have pointed to the role of American colleges and universities as embodied places of societal values and aspirations, reflecting both academic traditions and heritages alongside social and scientific change and innovation.Campus communities can engender positive outcomes including skills for inter- and intra-personal personal values,emotional intelligence, and civic engagement. Collectively, these outcomes can contribute to individual and community health and well-being, and a thriving functional democracy. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Rich, T. (PI)

CHPR 290: Curricular Practical Training and Internship

CHPR masters students enroll for a letter grade in your mentor's section. Before the end of the second week of the quarter, enrolled students must submit a description of the expected learning outcomes and deliverables for each unit to the CHPR office. One unit= three hours of work per week (30 hours for the quarter). CHPR 290 is also the CPT Course required for international students completing degree requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 72 units total)
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