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1 - 10 of 26 results for: CHEM

CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using a wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Students will build a problem solving tool-kit and apply chemical and mathematical concepts to solve problems related to energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition. Note: course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter, and only Leland Scholar Program participants will register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CHEM 31A: Chemical Principles I

31A is the first course in a two-quarter sequence designed to provide a robust foundation in key chemical principles for students with limited or no background in chemistry. The course engages students in group problem-solving activities throughout the class periods to deepen their ability to analyze and solve chemical problems. Students will also participate in one weekly laboratory activity that will immediately apply and expand upon classroom content. Labs and write-ups provide practice developing conceptual models that can explain qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of chemical phenomena. The course will introduce a common language of dimensional analysis, stoichiometry, and molecular naming that enables students to write chemical reactions, quantify reaction yield, and calculate empirical and molecular formulas. Stoichiometry will be immediately reinforced through a specific study of gases and their properties. Students will also build a fundamental understanding of atom more »
31A is the first course in a two-quarter sequence designed to provide a robust foundation in key chemical principles for students with limited or no background in chemistry. The course engages students in group problem-solving activities throughout the class periods to deepen their ability to analyze and solve chemical problems. Students will also participate in one weekly laboratory activity that will immediately apply and expand upon classroom content. Labs and write-ups provide practice developing conceptual models that can explain qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of chemical phenomena. The course will introduce a common language of dimensional analysis, stoichiometry, and molecular naming that enables students to write chemical reactions, quantify reaction yield, and calculate empirical and molecular formulas. Stoichiometry will be immediately reinforced through a specific study of gases and their properties. Students will also build a fundamental understanding of atomic and molecular structure by identifying interactions among nuclei, electrons, atoms and molecules. Through both lab and in-class exploration, students will learn to explain how these interactions determine the structures and properties of pure substances and mixtures using various bonding models including Lewis Dot, VSEPR, and Molecular Orbital Theory. Students will identify and quantitate the types and amounts of energy changes that accompany these interactions, phase changes, and chemical reactions, as they prepare to explore chemical dynamics in greater depth in 31B. Special emphasis will be placed on applying content and skills to real world applications such as estimating the carbon efficiency of fossil fuels, understanding hydrogen bonding and other interactions critical to DNA, and calculating the pressure exerted on a deep-sea diver. No prerequisites. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the General Chemistry Placement Test before the Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 31M: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (MATSCI 31)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and more »
A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions will include the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials with the same composition (for example: diamond, graphite, graphene). There will be three lectures and one two-hour laboratory session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, gas laws, and thermochemistry. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2021 General Chemistry Placement Test before the Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Same as: MATSCI 31
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 90: Directed Instruction/Reading

Undergraduates pursue a reading program under supervision of a faculty member in Chemistry; may also involve participation in lab. Prerequisites: superior work in CHEM 31A, 31B, 31M, or 33; and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)

CHEM 121: Understanding the Natural and Unnatural World through Chemistry

Students enrolled in this course will appreciate the transformative power of molecular science on the modern world and how foundational knowledge of chemistry enables profound discoveries in biological, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, engineering, energy, and materials science research. This course integrates the lessons of CHEM 31 and CHEM 33 through an examination of the structure-function properties of carbon-based molecules. Specific emphasis is given to the chemistry of carbonyl- and amine-derived compounds, polyfunctionalized molecules, reaction kinetics and thermodynamics, mechanistic arrow-pushing, and retrosynthetic analysis. Students will be empowered with a conceptual understanding of chemical reactivity, physical organic chemistry, and the logic of chemical synthesis. The singular nature of molecular design and synthesis to make available functional molecules and materials will be revealed. A three-hour lab section provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM 33 or co-requisite CHEM 100.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

CHEM 123: Organic Polyfunctional Compounds

Analysis of molecular symmetry and spectroscopy, aromaticity, aromatic reactivity, heterocyclic chemistry, chemistry of peptides and DNA. Prerequisite: CHEM 121
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Kanan, M. (PI)

CHEM 124: Organic Chemistry Laboratory

This is a laboratory course that serves as a stepping stone toward independent research in organic chemistry. Through several 1-2 step syntheses, this course trains students on basic organic laboratory techniques on purification of products, including extraction, distillation, recrystallization, thin layer chromatography, and column chromatography, as well as characterization of product structures using IR, GC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy. This course reviews MS, IR, and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy knowledge from Chem 33 and 121 with an emphasis on the practical interpretation of spectra, so that students can become independent in using these techniques to identify the purity and structures of organic compounds.nPrerequisite: Chem 121. Corequisite: Chem 123.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Freas, D. (PI)

CHEM 173: Physical Chemistry II

Introduction to quantum chemistry: the basic principles and applications of quantum theory, time independent and time dependent perturbation theory, absorption and emission spectroscopy, the variational method, atomic energy calculations, and introduction to basic computational chemistry methods. 4 units, for Autumn 2022 only. Prerequisites: CHEM 171; PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Fayer, M. (PI)

CHEM 174: Physical chemistry laboratory I (CHEM 274)

Introduction to materials chemistry concepts including synthesis and characterization by X ray diffraction and X ray photo electron spectroscopy. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements and electrocatalysis concepts will also be introduced. Students will perform nanoparticle and electrocatalyst synthesis, and characterize these materials by modern spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 171 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

CHEM 181: Biochemistry I (CHEMENG 181, CHEMENG 281)

Structure and function of major classes of biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Mechanistic analysis of properties of proteins including catalysis, signal transduction and membrane transport. Students will also learn to critically analyze data from the primary biochemical literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisites: Chem 121.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
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