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1 - 10 of 13 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 96: The Secret Lives of Statues (ARTHIST 104A, CLASSICS 96)

Statues-human-shaped sculptures-populate the uncanny valley that separates inert matter from living entities. For humans, this 'other population' can engender profound emotional responses, embody potent ideas, and entangle the politics of the past and present. However, the same materiality that endows statues with these exceptional capacities also makes them vulnerable to humans intent on acquiring otherwise-expensive materials cheaply, committing sectarian violence by proxy, or obliterating the material manifestations of memories. In this course, we will study sixteen (groups of) statues thematically. To do this, we will draw on a wide variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history, history, law, media studies, museum studies, and religious studies, to articulate why humans have revered and reviled statues, how the statues in our own lives are significant, and what the future might hold for statues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gisch, D. (PI)

ARCHLGY 97: Archaeology Internship

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 20 units total)

ARCHLGY 134A: Petroleum Geochemistry in Environmental and Archaeological Studies (ARCHLGY 234A, GEOLSCI 134, GEOLSCI 234)

This course focuses on petroleum, including gases, liquids, refined products, and `tar¿ from seeps used as a binder in archaeological artifacts, such as projectile points or pottery. The course is designed for students of geology, environmental science, and archaeology. It shows how molecular fossils (biomarkers) and other petroleum compounds can be used to identify the origins of contaminants, assist strategies for remediation, deconvolute mixtures, and validate the spatial significance of mapped hydrocarbon distributions. Lectures explain the processes that control petroleum composition in the subsurface, marine or subaerial spills, and archaeological artifacts, e.g., biodegradation, photooxidation, and water washing. Case studies (e.g., Deepwater Horizon, Exxon Valdez, bitumen in Egyptian mummies, seeps and ancient Olmec artifacts) and exercises show how geochemistry and multivariate statistics (chemometrics) can be used in successful forensic or archaeological studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Peters, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (CLASSICS 151)

Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 162: Archaeological approaches to Landscapes: How people and things make Places and Spaces (ANTHRO 104A)

This class introduces students to the archaeological concept of landscape as a heuristic that can be used in critical analysis. Students will learn to articulate the ways that landscapes are constituted in the process of `living.¿ They will be equipped to understand how they participate in the production of landscapes, and articulate a critical understanding of these processes, including the potentials for and modalities of `resistance¿ and `dominance¿ that are inherent in them (think the wearing out of a pathway through a lawn, despite lawns ostensibly not being intended to be walked through on campus). To develop this appreciation of their role and the larger politics of the production of landscapes, this class will draw on archaeological analyses and methods that examine landscapes of varying types and scales ¿ ranging from classic landscapes like the Stone Henge, Pyramids of Egypt, and Maya urbanism, and contemporary landscapes like Ground Zero, New York, and the City of Los Angele more »
This class introduces students to the archaeological concept of landscape as a heuristic that can be used in critical analysis. Students will learn to articulate the ways that landscapes are constituted in the process of `living.¿ They will be equipped to understand how they participate in the production of landscapes, and articulate a critical understanding of these processes, including the potentials for and modalities of `resistance¿ and `dominance¿ that are inherent in them (think the wearing out of a pathway through a lawn, despite lawns ostensibly not being intended to be walked through on campus). To develop this appreciation of their role and the larger politics of the production of landscapes, this class will draw on archaeological analyses and methods that examine landscapes of varying types and scales ¿ ranging from classic landscapes like the Stone Henge, Pyramids of Egypt, and Maya urbanism, and contemporary landscapes like Ground Zero, New York, and the City of Los Angeles, to more quotidian landscapes like homesteads in colonial Australia, plantations in colonial India, United States and the Caribbean and the `ranges¿ of native American tribes (as processual archaeologists rendered them). It will also explore prescriptive paradigms that have informed spatial practice e.g., the cosmologies of the Maya world and South India, and the grids of modern cities. Students will learn to see spatial production as a complex and political process in which agency is enacted at multiple scales and by agents with varying kinds of agencies, ranging from the spectacular to the quotidian and human to the posthuman. They will also be introduced to a range of analytical methods that draw on cultural ecology, practice theory, political economy, phenomenology and materiality studies amongst others to examine landscapes. Students will then use these analytical methods in projects of their own for their term papers to examine landscapes of their choosing. More advanced students will be introduced to the disciplinary discussions within archaeology that contextualized each of the methods and approaches discussed in class, enabling them to articulate the contexts in which they emerged within the discipline of archaeology as a social science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: Fanthome, E. (PI)

ARCHLGY 163: Movements and Migrations: Understanding the Movements of People (ANTHRO 134C, ASNAMST 163)

Mass movements of people across the world is not a new phenomenon. And yet, in the contemporary moment, the pace of migration from global business networks to displacements from violence and climate change as well as the interconnectivity of social networks is unprecedented. In this discussion seminar class, we will focus on the movements and migrations of people in North America. Though we will focus on the contemporary era, we start with examining the multiple ways that anthropologists understand, document, and make sense of the ways in which people have moved throughout history from bioanthropological, linguistic, archaeological, and ethnographic methodologies. We will further unpack some of the key theoretical discourses around the movement of people, and the frames of analysis that are commonly applied. By considering this topic through multiple lenses we will begin to appreciate the complexities of studying the movement of people and the relevance that these questions have to the present day. In addition to understanding the myriad of debates and case studies around movement and migration, students will develop their own research projects, learning essential skills in executing ethnographic approaches and applying the knowledge we survey throughout the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 166: African Archive Beyond Colonization (AFRICAAM 187, AFRICAST 117, CLASSICS 186, CLASSICS 286, CSRE 166)

From street names to monuments, the material sediments of colonial time can be seen, heard, and felt in the diverse cultural archives of ancient and contemporary Africa. This seminar aims to examine the role of ethnographic practice in the political agendas of past and present African nations. In the quest to reconstruct an imaginary of Africa in space and time, students will explore these social constructs in light of the rise of archaeology during the height of European empire and colonization. Particularly in the last 50 years, revived interest in African cultural heritage and preservation raises complex questions about the problematic tensions between European, American, and African theories of archaeological and ethnographic practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Derbew, S. (PI)

ARCHLGY 180: Investigating Ancient Materials (ANTHRO 180B, ANTHRO 280B, ARCHLGY 280, MATSCI 127, MATSCI 227)

This course examines how concepts and methods from materials science are applied to the analysis of archaeological artifacts, with a focus on artifacts made from inorganic materials (ceramics and metals). Coverage includes chemical analysis, microscopy, and testing of physical properties, as well as various research applications within anthropological archaeology. Students will learn how to navigate the wide range of available analytical techniques in order to choose methods that are appropriate to the types of artifacts being examined and that are capable of answering the archaeological questions being asked.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Chastain, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 190: Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ARCHLGY 195: Independent Study/Research

Students conducting independent study and or research with archaeology faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
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