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1 - 10 of 38 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 27N: Ethnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives

Ethnicity is one of the most compelling and most modern ways in which people - in the midst of considerable global and local uncertainty - all across the world imagine and narrate themselves. This seminar will take an anthropological look at both the modernity and the compulsions of ethnic allegiance, and, why struggles over ethnic identity are so frequently violent. Our questions will be both historical; how, why and when did people come to think of themselves as possessing different ethnic identities - and contemporary; how are these identities lived, understood, narrated, and transformed and what is the consequence of such ethnicisation. We follow this through anthropological perspectives which ask persistently how people themselves locally narrate and act upon their experiences and histories. Through this we will approach some of the really big and yet everyday questions that many of us around the world face: how do we relate to ourselves and to those we define as others; and how d more »
Ethnicity is one of the most compelling and most modern ways in which people - in the midst of considerable global and local uncertainty - all across the world imagine and narrate themselves. This seminar will take an anthropological look at both the modernity and the compulsions of ethnic allegiance, and, why struggles over ethnic identity are so frequently violent. Our questions will be both historical; how, why and when did people come to think of themselves as possessing different ethnic identities - and contemporary; how are these identities lived, understood, narrated, and transformed and what is the consequence of such ethnicisation. We follow this through anthropological perspectives which ask persistently how people themselves locally narrate and act upon their experiences and histories. Through this we will approach some of the really big and yet everyday questions that many of us around the world face: how do we relate to ourselves and to those we define as others; and how do we live through and after profound violence? The seminar will take these larger questions through a global perspective focusing on cases from Rwanda and Burundi, India, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Guatemala, and the countries of Former Yugoslavia among others. These cases cover a broad canvas of issues from questions of historicity, racial purity, cultural holism, and relations to the state, to contests over religious community, indigeneity, minority identities, globalization, gender, and generation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 91: Method and Evidence in Anthropology

This course provides a broad introduction to various ways of designing anthropological questions and associated methods for collecting evidence and supporting arguments. We review the inherent links between how a question is framed, the types of evidence that can address the question, and way that data are collected. Research activities such as interviewing, participant observation, quantitative observation, archival investigation, ecological survey, linguistic methodology, tracking extended cases, and demographic methods are reviewed. Various faculty and specialists will be brought in to discuss how they use different types of evidence and methods for supporting arguments in anthropology. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kendra, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 92A: Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop

Practicum. Students develop independent research projects and write research proposals. How to formulate a research question; how to integrate theory and field site; and step-by-step proposal writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Kendra, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 94: Postfield Research Seminar

Goal is to produce an ethnographic report based on original field research gathered during summer fieldwork, emphasizing writing and revising as steps in analysis and composition. Students critique classmates' work and revise their own writing in light of others' comments. Ethical issues in fieldwork and ethnographic writing, setting research write-up concerns within broader contexts. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 10 units total)

ANTHRO 95B: Independent Study for Honors or Senior Paper Writing

Required of Anthropology honors or senior paper candidates. Taken in the final quarter before handing in the final draft of the Honors or Senior Paper and graduating. This independent study supports work on the honors and senior papers for students with an approved honors or senior paper application in Anthropology. Prerequisite: consent of Anthropology faculty advisor. Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum Units: 1-5(not repeatable for credit)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 104A: Archaeological approaches to Landscapes: How people and things make Places and Spaces (ARCHLGY 162)

This class introduces students to the archaeological concept of landscape as a heuristic that can be used in critical analysis. Students will learn to articulate the ways that landscapes are constituted in the process of `living.¿ They will be equipped to understand how they participate in the production of landscapes, and articulate a critical understanding of these processes, including the potentials for and modalities of `resistance¿ and `dominance¿ that are inherent in them (think the wearing out of a pathway through a lawn, despite lawns ostensibly not being intended to be walked through on campus). To develop this appreciation of their role and the larger politics of the production of landscapes, this class will draw on archaeological analyses and methods that examine landscapes of varying types and scales ¿ ranging from classic landscapes like the Stone Henge, Pyramids of Egypt, and Maya urbanism, and contemporary landscapes like Ground Zero, New York, and the City of Los Angeles, to more quotidian landscapes like homesteads in colonial Australia, plantations in colonial India, United States and the Caribbean and the `ranges¿ of native American tribes (as processual archaeologists rendered them). It will also explore prescriptive paradigms that have informed spatial practice e.g., the cosmologies of the Maya world and South India, and the grids of modern cities. Students will learn to see spatial production as a complex and political process in which agency is enacted at multiple scales and by agents with varying kinds of agencies, ranging from the spectacular to the quotidian and human to the posthuman. They will also be introduced to a range of analytical methods that draw on cultural ecology, practice theory, political economy, phenomenology and materiality studies amongst others to examine landscapes. Students will then use these analytical methods in projects of their own for their term papers to examine landscapes of their choosing. More advanced students will be introduced to the disciplinary discussions within archaeology that contextualized each of the methods and approaches discussed in class, enabling them to articulate the contexts in which they emerged within the discipline of archaeology as a social science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: Fanthome, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 116: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 216)

An introduction to numeric methods in Anthropology and related fields employing the Data Desk statistics package to test hypotheses and to explore data. Examples chosen from the instructor's research and other relevant projects. No statistical background is necessary, but a working knowledge of algebra is important. Topics covered include: Frequency Distributions; Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion, and Variability; Probability and Probability Distributions; Statistical Inference, Comparisons of Sample Means and Standard Deviations; Analysis of Variance; Contingency Tables, Comparisons of Frequencies; Correlation and Regression; Principal Components Analysis; Discriminant Analysis; and Cluster Analysis. Grading based on take-home problem sets.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)
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