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231 - 240 of 290 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MS&E 276: Entrepreneurial Management and Finance

For graduate students only, with a preference for engineering and science majors. Emphasis on managing high-growth, early-stage enterprises, especially those with innovation-based products and services. Students work in teams to develop skills and approaches necessary to becoming effective entrepreneurial leaders and managers. Topics include assessing risk, understanding business models, analyzing key operational metrics, modeling cash flow and capital requirements, evaluating sources of financing, structuring and negotiating investments, managing organizational culture and incentives, managing the interplay between ownership and growth, and handling adversity and failure. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Prerequisite: basic accounting.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MS&E 284: Designing Modern Work Organizations

This practice-based experiential lab course is geared toward MS&E masters students. Students will master the concepts of organizational design, with an emphasis on applying them to modern challenges (technology, growth, globalization, and the modern workforce). Students will also gain mastery of skills necessary for success in today's workplace (working in teams, communicating verbally, presenting project work). Guest speakers from industry will present real-world challenges related to class concepts. Students will complete a quarter-long project designing and managing an actual online organization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they've learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply lean startup principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February, see hacking4defense.stanford.edu. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

MS&E 472: Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders' Seminar

Learn about entrepreneurship, innovation, culture, startups and strategy from a diverse lineup of accomplished leaders and entrepreneurs in venture capital, technology, education, philanthropy and more. Open to all Stanford students. Required weekly assignment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MS&E 489: d.Leadership: Leading Disruptive Innovation (ME 368)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 280: TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

NBIO 227: Understanding Techniques in Neuroscience

Students will learn to select and evaluate multidisciplinary techniques for approaching modern neuroscience questions. A combination of lectures and small group paper discussions will introduce techniques from molecular, genetic, behavioral, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational neuroscience. Students will be expected to complete homework assignments analyzing primary literature and attend optional laboratory demonstrations. Intended for graduate students, postdocs, and staff from any discipline; and for advanced undergraduates in the biosciences, engineering, or medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bendor, J. (PI)

OB 670: Designing Social Research

This is a course in the design of social research, with a particular emphasis on research field (i.e., non-laboratory) settings. As such, the course is a forum for discussing and developing an understanding of the different strategies social theorists employ to explain social processes, develop theories, and make these theories as believable as possible. In general, these issues will be discussed in the context of sociological research on organizations, but this will not be the exclusive focus of the course. A range of topics will be covered, for example: formulating and motivating research questions; varieties of explanation; experimental and quasi-experimental methods, including natural experiments; counterfactual models; conceptualization and measurement; sampling and case selection; qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is particularly oriented toward developing an appreciation of the tradeoffs of different approaches. It is well suited to Ph.D. students working on qualifying papers and dissertation proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

ORALCOMM 215: Voice Workshop (ORALCOMM 115)

Focus is on breath, voice production, expansion of vocal range and stamina, and clarity of articulation. Geared toward public speaking including presentations, lectures, and job talks. May be taken in conjunction with ORALCOMM 117. ORALCOMM 115/215 was previously listed as CTL 115/215.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Freeland, T. (PI)
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