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201 - 210 of 290 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HRP 249: Topics in Health Economics I (ECON 249, MED 249)

Course will cover various topics in health economics, from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics will include public financing and public policy in health care and health insurance; demand and supply of health insurance and healthcare; physicians' incentives; patient decision-making; competition policy in healthcare markets, intellectual property in the context of pharmaceutical drugs and medical technology; other aspects of interaction between public and private sectors in healthcare and health insurance markets. Key emphasis on recent work and empirical methods and modelling. Prerequisites: Micro and Econometrics first year sequences (or equivalent). Curricular prerequisites (if applicable): First year graduate Microeconomics and Econometrics sequences (or equivalent)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

HRP 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (MED 285)

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This 7 session lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors in health and the environment such as: healthcare/medical innovation, environmental sustainability, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition, public policy/systems change. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers/departments/schools, the course invites the discussion of global problems, interdisciplinary perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. nSpecial themes for AY 2020-2021 include: 1) US and Global Responses in Combatting the Coronavirus Pandemic; 2) Climate Crisis, Wildfires, Extreme Weat more »
Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This 7 session lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors in health and the environment such as: healthcare/medical innovation, environmental sustainability, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition, public policy/systems change. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers/departments/schools, the course invites the discussion of global problems, interdisciplinary perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. nSpecial themes for AY 2020-2021 include: 1) US and Global Responses in Combatting the Coronavirus Pandemic; 2) Climate Crisis, Wildfires, Extreme Weather and Environmental Sustainability; 3) Systemic Racism, Gender Inequality, Health Inequity and Community Well Being; 4) Democracy Under Siege, Political Landscape of Electoral, Judicial, Legislative Turmoil; 5) Partnership/Collaboration, Models of Leadership, Innovation, Sustainable Social Change; and Other Topics TBD by students/fellows. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll - registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)

INDE 212: Medical Humanities and the Arts

The interdisciplinary field of medical humanities: the use of the arts and humanities to examine medicine in personal, social, and cultural contexts. Topics include the doctor/patient relationship, the patient perspective, the meaning of doctoring, and the meaning of illness. Sources include visual and performing arts, film, and literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and scholarly writing. Designed for medical students in the Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration, but all students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 215: Queer Health & Medicine

Explores specific, pertinent, and timely issues impacting the health of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community; examines the role of the primary care physician in addressing the health care needs of this community. Guest lecturers provide a gender-sensitive approach to the medical care of the LGBT patient, breaking down homophobic barriers and reaffirming patient diversity. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

INDE 273: Medical Improvisation

Medicine, like theater, is both a skill set and an art form. The practice of medicine demands exceptional communicative, cognitive, and interpersonal skills in order to respond to unpredictable situations while interacting with a wide variety of individuals. Improvisational theater skills have a surprising and substantial overlap with those required of clinicians. Improv is a genre of performance art grounded in principles of spontaneity, adaptability, collaboration, and skilled listening. In this course, the principles and training techniques of improvisational theater are used to highlight and improve awareness, communication, and teamwork in the field of medicine. Limited enrollment. Class meets on five consecutive Mondays 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 from 5:30-7:30 pm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Nevins, A. (PI)

INDE 290A: Walk With Me: A Patient and Family Centered Exploration of Health & The Health Care System

This innovative course for pre-clinical students places patients, families, and caregivers front and center in the journey to explore health from a person-centered perspective and better understand the challenges of managing optimal health in a complex health care system. The curriculum is organized around a monthly workshop series, which explores a different health systems science topic each month through lectures from experts from Stanford and the community and from the perspectives of an individual patient or caregiver, or panel, with time to engage in discussion and explore patient-centered solutions to real-world problems. Students are also paired with a patient partner for the year with whom they meet monthly, outside of class, to explore the patient and caregiver journey by developing an individual relationship. Participation in this course can fulfill the ECE requirement. Enrollment by Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by September 11th at 11:59PM: nnStuden more »
This innovative course for pre-clinical students places patients, families, and caregivers front and center in the journey to explore health from a person-centered perspective and better understand the challenges of managing optimal health in a complex health care system. The curriculum is organized around a monthly workshop series, which explores a different health systems science topic each month through lectures from experts from Stanford and the community and from the perspectives of an individual patient or caregiver, or panel, with time to engage in discussion and explore patient-centered solutions to real-world problems. Students are also paired with a patient partner for the year with whom they meet monthly, outside of class, to explore the patient and caregiver journey by developing an individual relationship. Participation in this course can fulfill the ECE requirement. Enrollment by Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by September 11th at 11:59PM: nnStudent Application link: https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2smVd9WRkAulaDQnnThose selected will be informed by September 11th at 11:59PM so that they may enroll in the course. For questions, please email Alexander Doan (TA): aedoan96@stanford.edu or Cicily Chirayath (Prog. Coordinator): cicilyc@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

LATINAM 207: Spanish in Science/Science in Spanish (BIO 208, EARTHSYS 207)

For graduate and undergraduate students interested in the natural sciences and the Spanish language. Students will acquire the ability to communicate in Spanish using scientific language and will enhance their ability to read scientific literature written in Spanish. Emphasis on the development of science in Spanish-speaking countries or regions. Course is conducted in Spanish and intended for students pursuing degrees in the sciences, particularly disciplines such as ecology, environmental science, sustainability, resource management, anthropology, and archeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: Dirzo, R. (PI)

LAWGEN 112N: Law and Inequality

Most Americans know that discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and religion is unlawful. Seems simple enough. But advertisements in the back of newspapers still announce: "Single White Female Seeks Single White Male?" Isn't that discrimination on the basis of race and sex? Most businesses don't consider men for women's locker room or bathroom attendant. And why aren't those men and women's bathrooms and locker rooms illegal segregation? After all we know what would happened if some business set up separate bathrooms for blacks and whites. Isn't it discrimination for an employer to insist that men wear a jacket and tie and women wear nylons and a skirt? Why are some forms of discrimination unlawful and others not? Why is discrimination against short people, overweight people, or people with annoying personalities not against the law? We will answer these and many other questions by looking at court cases, legal theory, and philosophy. We may also have conversations with guest lectur more »
Most Americans know that discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and religion is unlawful. Seems simple enough. But advertisements in the back of newspapers still announce: "Single White Female Seeks Single White Male?" Isn't that discrimination on the basis of race and sex? Most businesses don't consider men for women's locker room or bathroom attendant. And why aren't those men and women's bathrooms and locker rooms illegal segregation? After all we know what would happened if some business set up separate bathrooms for blacks and whites. Isn't it discrimination for an employer to insist that men wear a jacket and tie and women wear nylons and a skirt? Why are some forms of discrimination unlawful and others not? Why is discrimination against short people, overweight people, or people with annoying personalities not against the law? We will answer these and many other questions by looking at court cases, legal theory, and philosophy. We may also have conversations with guest lecturers who work in civil rights enforcement, and the seminar may include a field trip to visit the offices of civil rights lawyers (lawyers tend to be busy people so these opportunities will depend on their schedules). Class participation and a short final paper are required, but here are no prerequisites other than an open mind and a willingness to delve into unfamiliar material.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Ford, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
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