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111 - 120 of 232 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 189X: Preparation for Senior Thesis (AFRICAAM 199X, CSRE 199, FEMGEN 199X)

This course is designed for juniors (majors, minors, and those seeking Interdisciplinary Honors in CSRE or FGSS) who intend to write a senior thesis in one of the CSRE Family of Programs or FGSS Interdisciplinary Honors. The course offers resources and strategies for putting together a significant and original senior thesis. Topics to be covered include: getting funding; finding an advisor; navigating the institutional review board; formulating an appropriate question; and finding the right data/medium/texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

ANTHRO 193: Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology

Do you know what an anthropological perspective is? Can you describe some of the key assumptions and questions within the discipline? nA major in Anthropology is composed of many specialized courses in different tracks, different emphases and seemingly a never-ending multiplication of perspectives and ethnographies. However, Anthropology is also an ongoing intellectual conversation with foundational questions, some of longstanding and some new. These foundational questions have stimulated different responses and answers and thus have also led to constant renewal of the discipline in the midst of profound disagreement. In this Anthropology Capstone course students across tracks and emphases will address some of the critical debates that have been central to the discipline as it has developed. We will feature three debate questions in the class. Preparation for each debate will be through class discussion of critical readings as well as extra-mural reading and preparation with one¿s debating partners.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 197C: The Structure of Colonial Power: South Asia since the Eighteenth Century (HISTORY 197C)

How did the colonial encounter shape the making of modern South Asia? Was colonial rule a radical rupture from the pre-modern past or did it embody historical continuities? Did colonial rule cause the economic underdevelopment of the region or were regional factors responsible for it? Did colonial forms of knowledge shape how we think of social structures in the Indian subcontinent? Did the colonial census merely register pre-existing Indian communities or did it reshape them? Did colonialism break with patriarchal power or further consolidate it? How did imperial power regulate sexuality in colonial India? What was the relationship between caste power and colonial power? How did capital and labor interact under colonial rule? How did colonialism mediate the very nature of modernity in the region?nnThis lecture-based survey course will explore the nature of the most significant historical process that shaped modern South Asia from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries -- colonialism. It primarily deals with the regions that constituted the directly administered territories of British India, specifically regions that subsequently became the nation-states of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Can, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 201: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 206A: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ANTHRO 209A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 109A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ANTHRO 210: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 110, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 210B: Examining Ethnographies (ANTHRO 110B)

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 212B: Biology, Culture and Social Justice in Latin America: Perspectives from Forensic Anthropology (CHILATST 212, CSRE 212)

This course will only take place in the first 5 weeks of the quarter.nnAs forensic anthropologists, we are routinely asked to make identifications of unknown human remains and provide courtroom testimony. Latin America has become a nexus for social justice work, as we respond to the humanitarian crisis along the U.S.-México Border. To improve identification methods of the undocumented dead, we must understand the diversity in Latinx people and adopt best scientific practices. This course provides a cross-disciplinary, bio-cultural approach to Latin American variation and training in applied methods of forensic anthropology. Explore how tools of biological and cultural anthropology are used jointly in human rights investigation and social justice advancement. Discover the breadth of Latinx diversity and how historical, geographic, and socio-cultural factors shape this variation. Gain hands-on experience in case analysis, using skeletal, genetic, and recovery context information to estimate key parameters of identity. Use case studies to contextualize this work through an intersectional lens that attends to the living families and the applicable historical, geo-political and socio-cultural conditions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
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