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201 - 210 of 268 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 407: The Resurrected Body: Animacy in Medieval Art

This course explores the relationship of spirit and matter in medieval art and architecture, more specifically how the changing appearance of objects and spaces evokes the presence of the metaphysical as glitter, reverberation, and shadow. We will engage objects and monuments across the Mediterranean, studying the way they were staged in order to produce the perception of liveliness. The phenomenology of liveliness will be tied to the development of the theology of resurrection of the body.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ARTHIST 407B: Art and Ritual in Italy 1250-1420 (ARTHIST 207B)

This seminar explores the ritual contexts of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of late medieval Italy. Rituals structured almost every aspect of life in Italian towns. Elaborately choreographed rites of passage marked the great events of the life cycle, from pregnancy and childbirth to marriage to death. Each town¿s ritual calendar established the rhythms of the year. Major feast days were celebrated with all the pageantry of the late medieval Church. Crises ¿ whether famine or plague or the threat of war ¿ spawned their own ritual responses, often penitential processions of flagellants. The course considers the ways in which works of art register, respond to and participate in these rites. The last part of the course will focus on one of the most important and distinctive ritual spaces in late medieval Italy, the baptistery. Works to be studied include some by the greatest painters and sculptors of the era: the painters Duccio, Giotto, Simone Martini, Ambrogio Lorenzetti and Pietro Lorenzetti, and the sculptors Nicola Pisano and Giovanni Pisano.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 407C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 207C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARTHIST 408: Hagia Sophia (ARTHIST 208, CLASSICS 173, CLASSICS 273)

By employing a methodology based in psychoacoustics, semiotics, and phenomenology, this course explores the relationship among sound, water, marble, meaning, and religious experience in the sixth-century church of HagianSophia built by emperor Justinian in Constantinople. We will read medieval sources describing the interior and ritual, make short movies exploring the shimmer of marble in buildings on campus, and study the acoustics of domed buildings through computer auralization done at Stanford's CCRMA (Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics)
Last offered: Winter 2016

ARTHIST 408B: The Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews (ARTHIST 208B)

The seminar explores the hybrid character of the art of Medieval Spain between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. Rather than strictly chronological, our exploration of the artistic production of Muslims, Jews, and Christians is structured around major topics such as imperial power, pilgrimage, word and image. The readings juxtapose historical studies of specifically Spanish sites and objects with theoretical approaches tied to the broader themes.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ARTHIST 409: Iconoclasm (ARTHIST 209C, CLASSICS 158, CLASSICS 258, REES 409)

By the seventh century three large political entities formed in the Mediterranean the Umayyads, the Carolingians, and the Byzantines each competed for legitimacy; all three emerged from the ashes of Late Antique culture, yet each tried to carve out an identity out of this common foundation. In this parting of the ways, the three empires took among others the issue of what constitutes an image and what role it plays in devotion. Eik'n, imago, ura became the basis on which to built differences and accuse the other political players of idolatry. This course explores medieval image theory, especially the phenomena of iconoclasm, iconophobia, and aniconism. The discussions focus on monuments in the Mediterranean as well as objects in the Cantor collection and facsimiles of manuscripts at the Bowes Art Library.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 410B: Giotto (ARTHIST 210)

Often hailed as ¿the father of western painting,¿ Giotto was seen as a revolutionary figure even in his own day. We will begin with Giotto¿s critical reception, his artistic predecessors and contemporaries, and his work for patrons ranging from the Franciscan order to the king of Naples. We will most closely examine Giotto¿s masterpiece, the frescoes of the Arena Chapel in Padua, and consider topics including Giotto¿s figural realism, the layered readings of the program, its use of visual rhetoric, and issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARTHIST 413: Michelangelo

Michelangelo's long career in light of recent scholarship. Topics include the status of the cult image, the paragon between poetry and the pictorial arts, painting and questions of literary genre, and Counter Reformation reactions to his art.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 415: Baroque: 1900-2000

The seminar, which is largely methodological and historiographic, problematizes issues of periodization. The course examines different approaches to the question of "what is baroque," from Alois Riegl and Erwin Panofsky to Michel Foucault, Svetlana Alpers and Giovanni Careri.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARTHIST 416: Bernini and Baroque Rome

This seminar examines the career of Gianlorenzo Bernini (1598-1680), sculptor, architect, painter, stage designer and playwright, the premier artist of the popes. It will examine his cultural, political and religious milieu and lay particular emphasis on the theoretical relations between the arts that his oeuvre is seen to embody. In the process it will also review the genre of artistic biography, the historiography of the baroque and the myths of dynamism, theatricality, eroticism (and others) always associated with the period, and Bernini's work in particular. Limited to PhD students in Art History and Film Studies, and advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2015
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