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171 - 180 of 251 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 113: The Human-Plant Connection

The intertwined biologies of humans and plants, particularly the ways in which people and plants have imposed selection pressures and ecological change on one another. Topics include evolution and basic plant structure; plant domestication; effects of agriculture on human health and physiology; plants in traditional and contemporary diets; and human influences on plant biology through genetic manipulation and environmental change. Class meetings center on journal articles. Final project includes written and multimedia presentations. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Preston, K. (PI)

HUMBIO 117H: Human Behavioral Ecology (ANTHRO 161, ANTHRO 261)

Theory, method, and application in anthropology. How theory in behavioral ecology developed to understand animal behavior is applied to questions about human economic decision making in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Topics include decisions about foraging and subsistence, competition and cooperation, mating, and reproduction and parenting.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 130: Human Nutrition (CHPR 130)

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 145L: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171, ANTHRO 271)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 153: Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges

Parasitic and other pestilence of public health importance. Pathogenesis, clinical syndromes, complex life cycles, and the interplay among environment, vectors, hosts, and reservoirs in historical context. Public health policy initiatives aimed at halting disease transmission. World Health Organization tropical disease targets including river blindness, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, mycobacterial disease (tuberculosis and leprosy), malaria, toxoplasmosis, dracunculiais, and intestinal helminthes. Guest lecturers with expertise in disease control. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 157: The Biology of Stem Cells

The role of stem cells in human development and potential for treating disease. Guest lectures by biologists, ethicists, and legal scholars. Prerequisites: HumBio 2A and 3A, or the equivalent in the BioCore in Biological Sciences.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 158: The Human Genome and Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 159: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (HRP 238)

The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite: basic course in genetics; for undergraduates, Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Popat, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 160: Human Behavioral Biology (BIO 150)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 180: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)
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