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251 - 260 of 290 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PUBLPOL 234: Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals (PUBLPOL 134)

( PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234 - 3 credits, Ways - ER) (Same as LAW 7020) The objective of this course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding and the law can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government, non-profit, and academia. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. There is significant space for personal reflection and forming your own views on a wide range of issues. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. The relationships among ethics and technology, culture, leadership, law, and global risks (inequality, privacy, financial system meltdown, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) will inform discussion. A broad range of international topics might include: designer genetics; civ more »
( PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234 - 3 credits, Ways - ER) (Same as LAW 7020) The objective of this course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding and the law can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government, non-profit, and academia. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. There is significant space for personal reflection and forming your own views on a wide range of issues. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. The relationships among ethics and technology, culture, leadership, law, and global risks (inequality, privacy, financial system meltdown, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) will inform discussion. A broad range of international topics might include: designer genetics; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); social media (e.g. Facebook Cambridge Analytica, on-line sex trafficking, monopolies); new devices (e.g. Amazon Alexa in hotel rooms); free speech on University campuses; opioid addiction; AI (from racism to the work challenge and beyond); corporate and financial sector scandals (Theranos, Wells Fargo fraudulent account creation, Volkswagen emissions testing manipulation); new corporate challenges (e.g. Google selling drones to the military and Facebook¿s new Libra crypto currency); and non-profit sector ethics challenges (e.g. NGOs engagement with ISIS and sexual misconduct in humanitarian aid (Oxfam case)). Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities to earn participation credit beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on rigorous analysis, critical thinking and testing ideas in real-world contexts. Please note that this course will require one make-up evening session on a Wednesday or Thursday in lieu of the final class session the first week of June, and two one-hour extensions to Monday class sessions as a make-up for May 11, so the course will end before Memorial Day. Permission numbers are required for enrollment. Please email the Public Policy Program at saharh@stanford.edu to obtain a permission number. The course offers credit toward Public Policy core requirements (if taken in combination with PUBLPOL 103E or PUBLPOL 103F), and Science, Technology and Society majors and satisfies the undergraduate Ways of Thinking - Ethical Reasoning requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Students taking the course for Ways credit and Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC. Students seeking credit for other majors should consult their departments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Liautaud, S. (PI)

PUBLPOL 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, SOC 168, SOC 268)

In this class we study the design of effective human organizations, within and across institutional settings. We learn how to apply analytical tools, from the social sciences, to organizations, to understand the process of executing strategies, the challenges in changing them, and accountability. The theme for 2022 year's class will be the change of the police force. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

PUBLPOL 306: Writing and Rhetoric for Policy Audiences

This course offers hands-on learning of effective writing and presentation techniques for audiences that include policy makers, decision stakeholders, interest groups, the media, and the public. Class time will be spent learning lessons in rhetoric, analyzing multiple written genres (memo, op-ed, report, media communications), participating in peer review, and practicing presentation strategies (elevator pitch, press conference, media interview, board meeting, formal presentation). Course texts include sample memos, op-eds, and white papers, as well as rhetoric handouts and videos. Students will draft, revise, and submit writing for policy audiences in the compilation of a final portfolio. Students will also produce oral and multimedia arguments, individually and in teams. Students will be responsible for timely peer review and short presentations on course materials. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

RELIGST 391: Teaching Religious Studies

This seminar will help prepare you for your role as a university teacher both at a practical and a theoretical level. We will focus on how to best obtain (and keep) a new academic position. We will thus often work together on ¿nuts and bolts¿ issues such as syllabus design, engaging lectures, lively seminar discussions, positive classroom dynamics, and producing a strong teaching portfolio. We will also explore recent developments in pedagogical theory, cognitive science, and educational psychology that have bearing on effective university level teaching. These will be situated within the specific demands of the religious studies classroom and supplemented by guest speakers who will help us explore how institutional context affects the ways one teaches.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Penn, M. (PI)

SOC 258C: Using Data to Describe the World: Descriptive Social Science Research Techniques (EDUC 430C)

This course focuses on the skills needed to conduct theoretically-informed and policy-relevant descriptive social science. Students read recent examples of rigorous descriptive quantitative research that exemplifies the use of data to describe important phenomena related to educational and social inequality. The course will help develop skills necessary to conceptualize, operationalize, and communicate descriptive research, including techniques related to measurement and measurement error, data harmonization, data reduction, and visualization. Students develop a descriptive project during the course. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of a course in multivariate regression.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: reardon, s. (PI)

SOC 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168)

In this class we study the design of effective human organizations, within and across institutional settings. We learn how to apply analytical tools, from the social sciences, to organizations, to understand the process of executing strategies, the challenges in changing them, and accountability. The theme for 2022 year's class will be the change of the police force. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

SOC 280B: Introduction to Data Analysis (CSRE 180B, SOC 180B)

Preference to Sociology majors and minors. Enrollment for non-sociologists will open two weeks after winter enrollment begins. Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Jackson, M. (PI)

SOMGEN 203: Literature and Writing for Military Affiliated Students

Who gets to tell a war story? Everyone who is affected by war. So everyone. This class will explore short readings of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction written by veterans or influenced by conflict. We will discuss the importance of war writing as a medium of expression for veterans, a means of understanding and reconciliation for civilians, and the ways it has impacted culture as a whole. The work will include short reading assignments, in-class writing prompts and guest speaker(s), such as General Jim Mattis, veteran writer Hugh Martin and others. There will be a final 1,500-word project.No writing experience required or expected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women's health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women's cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women's unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape. nnFor second unit, students do a midterm project and final project on a topic of their choosing which has been approved by the instructor, as well as meet with the instructor in small groups 2-3 additional times (days/times TBD depending on schedules) throughout the quarter to discuss progress.nnStudents registering for two units must take for Letter grade and students registering for one unit must select S/NC or +/-.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health (INTLPOL 291, PUBLPOL 291)

Organizations dedicated to improving global health deploy various approaches ranging from efforts to improve economic conditions, health systems, and technology to policy change and advocacy. This course critically evaluates 15 common theories of change that underlay global health interventions. Students will review and discuss examples of both success and failure of each theory of change drawn from journal articles from various disciplines. This seminar is appropriate for graduate students of any discipline who are interested in considering the range of approaches and their likely utility when considering a specific global health problem in a particular location. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed rigorous related coursework and who are willing to commit the preparatory time are welcome. Our discussions benefit greatly from diverse perspectives. Sign up for 3 unit credits to participate in the seminar or 4 units to participate in the seminar and complete a project that provides an opportunity to apply these ideas to a global health problem of your interest.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)
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