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1 - 10 of 14 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 27Q: The Detective and the City

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1890s, San Francisco and Los Angeles in the 1920s and 30s, and Shanghai in the 1990s) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring four great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade, Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe, and Qiu Xiaolong's Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives, another literary detective of your own choosing, or on one of today's related manifestations of the same impulse in popular visual culture featuring superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. A majority of the world's population now live in urban areas and most of the rapid urbanization has taken place in mega-cities outside the Western world. This course explores urban cultures, identities, spatial practices and forms of urban power and imagination in Asia, Africa and Latin America.nParticipants will be introduced to a global history of urban development that demonstrates how the legacies of colonialism, modernization theory and global race thinking have shaped urban designs and urban life in most of the world. Students will also be introduced to interpretative and qualitative approaches to urban life that affords an understanding of important, if unquantifiable, vectors of urban life: stereotypes, fear, identity formations, utopia, social segregation and aspirations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ED, GER:DB-SocSci

URBANST 123: Designing Research for Social Justice: Writing a Community-Based Research Proposal (CSRE 146A)

This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges invol more »
This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges involved. By the end of the course, students should have a complete research proposal that can be used to apply for a number of summer funding opportunities including the Chappell Lougee Scholarship, the Community-Based Research Fellowship, Cardinal Quarter fellowships, and Major Grants. Please note that completion of the course does not guarantee funding-- rather, the course supports you in learning how to write a strong community-engaged research proposal that you can use to apply to any number of fellowships). This course is also useful for students in any academic year who are interested in pursuing community-engaged theses or capstone projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Tien, J. (PI)

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Engage with founders of leading social enterprises, "Innovator for the 21st Century" (TIME magazine), an "Impact 30" entrepreneur (Forbes), an "Edison Achievement" awardee for innovation and a United Nations "Champion of the Earth", including Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Mohammad Yunus of Grameen Bank, Chris Anderson of TED Talks and Linda Rottenberg of Endeavor. The weekly lineup of accomplished founders also includes Ramya Swaminathan of Malta, Inc. and Ethan Brown of Beyond Meat. Students will be exposed to the perspectives and endeavors of global high-impact entrepreneurs who address social and environmental needs in the U.S. and internationally through for-profit, nonprofit and hybrid models. Each week after a live in-depth interview with a social entrepreneur, students will have the opportunity to converse directly with each guest entrepreneur during Q&A. This class will expose students to pioneering thought leaders, diverse impact career paths, networking and potential internship and job opportunities.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Edwards, M. (PI)

URBANST 155A: Environmental Justice Colloquium (EARTHSYS 194A, HUMRTS 194A)

This colloquium brings the voices and vision of leading Environmental Justice (EJ) advocates to the Stanford community, in order to educate, inspire, and transform our understanding of environmental science. Environmental Justice advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism. EJ approaches involve centering the voices and leadership of marginalized communities in 1) ensuring equitable access to environmental benefits, and 2) preventing or mitigating the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities, regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity, or other social positions. This colloquium highlights the work of leading EJ thinkers and practitioners, speaking from frontline organizations on a wide range of topics. These topics include acting on toxic exposures and health disparities for community resilience, climate justice and youth action, Indigenous land and water rights, green cities and Afrofuturism, food justice and interse more »
This colloquium brings the voices and vision of leading Environmental Justice (EJ) advocates to the Stanford community, in order to educate, inspire, and transform our understanding of environmental science. Environmental Justice advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism. EJ approaches involve centering the voices and leadership of marginalized communities in 1) ensuring equitable access to environmental benefits, and 2) preventing or mitigating the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities, regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity, or other social positions. This colloquium highlights the work of leading EJ thinkers and practitioners, speaking from frontline organizations on a wide range of topics. These topics include acting on toxic exposures and health disparities for community resilience, climate justice and youth action, Indigenous land and water rights, green cities and Afrofuturism, food justice and intersecting social movements, queer ecologies, and more. The colloquium will host a weekly speaker, and final symposium at the end of the quarter. nnStudents registering for the colloquium will join us virtually by ZOOM.nnCourse meetings will be held every Wednesday, beginning on October 6 and ending on November 17, 11:00-12:50pm. The final November 17 meeting is the Annual Environmental Justice Symposium, 11:00am-2:00pm (for those who can stay the extended hour).
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

URBANST 169: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, CSRE 260)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

URBANST 173: The Urban Economy (PUBLPOL 174)

Applies the principles of economic analysis to historical and contemporary urban and regional development issues and policies. Explores themes of urban economic geography, location decision-making by firms and individuals, urban land and housing markets, and local government finance. Critically evaluates historical and contemporary government policies regulating urban land use, housing, employment development, and transportation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

URBANST 194: Internship in Urban Studies

For Urban Studies majors only. Students organize an internship in an office of a government agency, a community organization, or a private firm directly relevant to the major. Reading supplements internship. Paper summarizes internship experience and related readings.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 195: Special Projects in Urban Studies

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

URBANST 196: Senior Research in Public Service (EDUC 196)

Limited to seniors approved by their departments for honors thesis and admitted to the year-round Public Service Scholars Program sponsored by the Haas Center for Public Service. What standards in addition to those expected by the academy apply to research conducted as a form of public service? How can communities benefit from research? Theory and practice of research as a form of public service readings, thesis workshops, and public presentation of completed research. May be repeated for credit. Corequisite: 199.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
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